Good Day. It’s Friday, December 3, 2021





Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com









It’s Friday, which means the entire staff of TheSeniorLog gets a few days off to recharge. It’s also an opportunity for us to step back and review the week past. And, from what I see, it has been a productive one.
 
Wars comprise small battles, won by individuals by gradually chipping away at the “enemies” defenses. Such a battle was won on behalf of of many of our less independent and less mobile residents this past week. And, while it is a minor victory, it is none the less sweet.



It began Thanksgiving morning when a table-mate was denied entrance to the dining room because they arrived a few minutes past the “latecomers” deadline. After this resident was seated, a supervisor came to our table had told this resident (who has extreme mobility issues) they had to leave and go to our alternative dining area to be fed. I took exception to this and said so in no uncertain terms. This prompted a visit from our administrator, who sided with the supervisor, further increasing my ire. I lost that skirmish, but vowed to do something about it.
 
This past Monday at our monthly residents’ meeting, I put forth a proposal that would make the lateness rule more flexible, asking that each incident be handled on a case-by-case basis. I am proud to say, apparently we have won that battle.
 
I say “apparently” because there was no formal announcement attesting to a rule modification. And I expect there will never be one. But casual observation over the last few days has confirmed that “special needs” latecomers are no longer being banished from eating at their regular tables with their friends. Sometimes the good-guys win……………
 



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DECEMBER 3, 2021


This year’s flu strain particularly
dangerous for older adults


The flu season is beginning to gain traction with a predominant strain that concerns one infectious disease expert, and he’s urging everyone 6 months and older to get a flu shot.



“We’re starting to see the first cases,” said Dr. Bill Petri, professor of infectious diseases at the University of Virginia. “And it’s the more dangerous of the three strains that’s here. It’s what’s called influenza A (H3N2), which is associated with worse diseases, especially in the elderly.”


In the past, influenza A (H3N2) virus-predominant seasons were associated with more hospitalizations and deaths in people 65 and older compared with other age groups and other influenza viruses, according to a recent advisory from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that warned about increased A (H3N2) activity.




What's the Best Bedtime For Better Heart Health?
By Peter Urban

Falling asleep between 10 and 11 p.m. just might do your heart good, according to a new study that found adults whose bedtime begins during that hour are at lower risk of developing heart disease compared with adults who fall asleep either earlier or later at night.​


Compared with adults who fall asleep during the 10 o’clock hour, the study appearing in the European Heart Journal — Digital Health found, adults who fall asleep after midnight had a 25 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Falling asleep before 10 o’clock put adults at 24 percent greater risk. And falling asleep during the 11 o’clock hour put adults at 12 percent greater risk.​

“Our study indicates that the optimum time to go to sleep is at a specific point in the body’s 24-hour cycle and deviations may be detrimental to health. The riskiest time was after midnight, potentially because it may reduce the likelihood of seeing morning light, which resets the body clock,” study coauthor David Plans, a senior lecturer in organizational neuroscience at the University of Exeter, said in a statement.​



Could the Pandemic Transform Nursing Homes?

If COVID-19 taught us anything, it's that it's time to rethink (and redesign) America's long-term care facilities


In October, 150 people stood in the rain to celebrate the groundbreaking of an innovative elder housing project on rural Key Peninsula in western Washington State. For the first time, older people who are no longer able to live at home there can still remain in their community. The nonprofit Mustard Seed Project is building three Green House homes, two for assisted living and one for memory care. Almost one-third of the studio apartments will be for low-income people who are on Medicaid.


Founded in 2006, the Mustard Seed Project helps people age in place, with transportation, home repairs, friendly visits, yard cleanup and information and referrals. "The missing piece was supportive housing," says Executive Director Eric Blegen.  



Checking in and Reconnecting with Family this Holiday Season.

To say that last year’s 2020 holiday season was strange and exhausting would be a massive understatement. With the pandemic raging out of control and the COVID vaccine unavailable to most, many families had to settle for Zoom parties in place of visiting with loved ones.


Even worse, grandparents and other family members more at risk of severe COVID outcomes were forced to shelter away from loved ones, creating even more mental stress, and loneliness.


While we are not completely out of the woods, COVID concerns are easing and with the holiday season nearly upon us once again, this year’s celebrations are about reconnecting with loved ones and checking in on their physical and mental well-being. While we all want to use these get-togethers to spend precious time and catch up with relatives, these gatherings also present the opportunity to keep an eye out for noticeable changes in behavior and living conditions of aging family members. It is important to be alert to any changes that may reveal health needs and care challenges that require intervention.



People with dementia may not benefit from
a clutter-free environment
Reviewed by Emily Henderson

A clutter-free environment may not help people with dementia carry out daily tasks - according to a new study from the University of East Anglia.



Researchers studied whether people with dementia were better able to carry out tasks, such as making a cup of tea, at home - surrounded by their usual clutter - or in a clutter-free environment.


They were surprised to find that participants with moderate dementia performed better when surrounded by their usual clutter.







Mental health of older adults significantly
impacted by COVID-19 pandemic

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
=========================================================
How to Best Handle Social Security in 2022
by Stephen Silver
Read more  >>  https://nationalinterest.org/blog/politics/how-best-handle-social-security-2022-197160
=========================================================
What Older Adults Should Know About
Medicare Preventive Services

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/older-adults-medicare-preventive-services/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=daf40d730b-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_23_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-daf40d730b-165407981&mc_cid=daf40d730b&mc_eid=94767a79b9
=========================================================
Tips for picking Medicare plan this open-enrollment season
by Emily Scott
Read more  >>  https://kiowacountypress.net/content/tips-picking-medicare-plan-open-enrollment-season
=========================================================
No One Cares!
By Arthur C. Brooks
Read more  >>  https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2021/11/how-stop-caring-what-other-people-think-you/620670/?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter
=========================================================
How To Avoid Mistakes When Enrolling in Medicare
By Dena Bunis
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/medicare-insurance/info-2019/common-medicare-mistakes.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-MEDICARE--CTRL-112621-P1-5960612&ET_CID=5960612&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
===================================================
High-end assisted living facilities popping up around the country
Read more  >>  https://therealdeal.com/2021/11/28/high-end-assisted-living-facilities-popping-up-around-the-country/
===================================================
New Mexico least affordable for assisted living,
New Jersey most expensive, analysis finds

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/new-mexico-least-affordable-for-assisted-living-new-jersey-most-expensive-analysis-finds/
====================================================
Demand for Liver Transplant Rises Sharply
Among Older Americans
By Dennis Thompson
Read more  >>  https://consumer.healthday.com/11-15-need-for-liver-transplant-is-soaring-among-older-americans-2655526156.html
====================================================
Smartphone memory apps can help older adults
with mild dementia to complete daily tasks

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211117/Smartphone-memory-apps-can-help-older-adults-with-mild-dementia-to-complete-daily-tasks.aspx
====================================================
What to Get Grandma or Grandpa for the Holidays …
and Why Comfy Slippers Aren't on the List

By Linda Mac Dougall
Read more  >>  https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/what-to-get-grandma-or-grandpa-for-the-holidays--and-why-comfy-slippers-arent-on-the-list-301431957.html
====================================================
GrandPad tablet can be the best thing that
the senior citizens will want to use

By Sovan Mandal
Read more  >> https://goodereader.com/blog/tablet-slates/grandpad-tablet-can-be-the-best-thing-that-the-senior-citizens-will-want-to-use
====================================================
What's the Future for the
Retirement Security of Women?
Read more  >> https://www.nextavenue.org/future-for-retirement-security-women/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=daf40d730b-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_23_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-daf40d730b-165407981&mc_cid=daf40d730b&mc_eid=94767a79b9
====================================================
Understanding costs of assisted living
Read more  >>  https://www.rockymounttelegram.com/understanding-costs-of-assisted-living/article_e0718135-ca58-542b-98fc-b17ece17124b.html
====================================================
New York closely monitoring nursing homes, Hochul says
By Nick Reisman
Read more  >>  https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/central-ny/ny-state-of-politics/2021/11/29/new-york-closely-monitoring-nursing-homes--hochul-says
====================================================
Overcoming Unconscious Age Bias:
An Expert's Advice

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/unconscious-age-bias-experts-advice/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=cf29a22e52-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_16_21___COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-cf29a22e52-165407981&mc_cid=cf29a22e52&mc_eid=94767a79b9
====================================================
6 ways to combat ageism and reframe
how we think about getting older

By Helen Dennis
Read more  >>  https://www.dailynews.com/2021/11/28/6-ways-to-combat-ageism-and-reframe-how-we-think-about-getting-older/
====================================================
How families can take the next steps when it comes to
moving loved ones into senior living environments

By Jacob Holley
Read more  >>  https://www.grandforksherald.com/business/7267222-How-families-can-take-the-next-steps-when-it-comes-to-moving-loved-ones-into-senior-living-environments





Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) Information | SSA

Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for approximately 70 million Americans will increase 5.9 percent in 2022.

The 5.9 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits payable to more than 64 million Social Security beneficiaries in January 2022. Increased payments to approximately 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin on December 30, 2021. (Note: some people receive both Social Security and SSI benefits)



The maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax (taxable maximum) will increase to $147,000.

The earnings limit for workers who are younger than "full" retirement age (see Full Retirement Age Chart) will increase to $19,560. (We deduct $1 from benefits for each $2 earned over $19,560.)

The earnings limit for people reaching their “full” retirement age in 2022 will increase to $51,960. (We deduct $1 from benefits for each $3 earned over $51,960 until the month the worker turns “full” retirement age.)

There is no limit on earnings for workers who are "full" retirement age or older for the entire year.

Read more about the COLA, tax, benefit and earning amounts for 2022. > https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/factsheets/colafacts2022.pdf








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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, DECEMBER 6. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Thursday, December 2, 2021



Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com









The truth be told, If I wasn’t a resident here at the A.L.F., the chances of me seeing a doctor regularly would be slim to none. It’s not because I dislike doctors. On the contrary. In my lifetime, I have literally come in contact with hundreds of doctors. Doctors saved my life many times over, and I am eternally grateful for that. But there is something about visiting the doctor’s office that makes me uncomfortable, if not downright nervous.

Visits to the doctors when you are young are just an annoyance. Usually there’s a shot involved, as well as a lot of poking and prodding. But when you leave, you leave with the knowledge you are done for another year and that’s that. But not so when you get to be my age. Now, every time the doctor says “I need you to come in”, you know he’s not doing so just to tell you his golf score. Nope. A visit to the doc’s after age 65 always has the possibility of not ending well.

Such were my thoughts this past Tuesday when a memo left at my door summoned me to the medical suite here at the Asylum, to see my primary care physician. I had taken a blood test a week before as part of our routine medical care here, so I knew the reason for the appointment. What new ailment, malignancy, malformation or irregularity was I to be informed of?


 Arriving for my appointment early, I sat with three or four other residents, there for the same reason as I. The apprehension on their faces told the story. All believed they would receive bad news.
 
There were two people ahead of me and it was my turn.
 
“How are you feeling, Mr. Cooper?” said the doctor. “What did he mean by that?” thought I.
 
“Okay. Really great, doc,” I announced, hoping to make whatever bad news he had to tell me go away.
 
He took my blood pressure and listen to my chest noises. No comment on either. He turned a sheet of paper on his desk.

“Your #$%%^& [1] levels are slightly elevated from last time. Not much, but we have to watch it. Try drinking more water.”
 
That’s it? Drink water? Why was I worried?
 
It’s natural. At our age, things can go south quick and with dire consequences. Fortunately, because I have these regular office visits, anything that goes wrong can be acted upon quickly and usually cured or mitigated before it gets worse. I know this, of course. But that still does not make these impromptu office visits any less nerve-racking. But maybe “nervous” is good. It makes you come face to face with the reality of your mortality. And, while this visit turned out to be of little consequence, no one knows if the next one won’t mean it’s THE END……..
 

[1] It’s none of your business what my levels are elevated for.




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DECEMBER 2, 2021



New York closely monitoring nursing homes, Hochul says
By Nick Reisman


New York state officials are closely monitoring nursing homes and long-term care facilities in the state amid concerns over the spread of a new variant of the virus around the globe, Gov. Kathy Hochul on Monday said.


But for now, state officials will not alter the unrestricted visitation guidelines for nursing homes, Hochul said, pointing to a lack in the rise of hospitalizations among residents.

"It's a very different dynamic than we were experiencing last year and a year and a half ago, which was a huge vulnerability," she said at a news conference on Monday in New York City. "We're not seeing high numbers of nursing home people entering hospitals right now. If that changes, we can turn on a dime."




Overcoming Unconscious Age Bias:
An Expert's Advice

Why people make snap judgments of others based on age, and what could change that

In her thought-provoking new book, "The End of Bias: A Beginning," science and culture journalist Jessica Nordell probes the science and practice of overcoming unconscious bias. That's what happens quickly when we encounter a person or a situation and our reaction conflicts with our professed values. We see it a lot with race and gender. But what about unconscious age bias?


That's what I wanted to find out after reading "The End of Bias," which barely mentioned the bias of ageism. When I Zoomed with Nordell to interview her, she said there's a paucity of research on age bias compared to racial bias and gender bias.








6 ways to combat ageism and reframe
how we think about getting older

By Helen Dennis

Ageism is a hot topic. It is defined as prejudice against an individual or group solely on the basis of their age. I recently had the opportunity to have a conversation with Ashton Applewhite, a leading advocate and spokesperson to fight ageism and author of “This Chairs Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism.”


The format was a webinar presented by the Palos Verdes Peninsula Village’s fifth annual Upside of Aging event. This Village is part of a national movement to support older adults to age and live-in place and stay connected to their communities. We are fortunate to have several other villages in our area including: South Bay Village, Pasadena Village, Westside Pacific Villages and ChaiVillageLA.

Applewhite had no intention of becoming the expert advocate on ageism. She was motivated by apprehension about her own aging and realized that what she knew about the subject was a bit off base. She never thought she would eat, drink and sleep ageism 24/7; that’s what she does.



How families can take the next steps when it comes to
moving loved ones into senior living environments

By Jacob Holley

Families have tough decisions to make in the days leading up to a loved one entering a senior living facility.


Julie Vatnsdal, the housing coordinator at Valley Senior Living, and Cheryl Ekren, its housing manager, spoke to the Herald about the first steps people take when considering or moving forward with the process of moving a loved one into a senior living facility.


However, there are different levels of care that can be provided to those in assisted living facilities. So, what are the first steps for families to decide what kind of care their loved ones need?






More Than 70% of Older Americans
Feel Younger Than They Actually Are
– And Are Embracing Aging



Age is nothing but a number for most older Americans, as 84% said they have embraced aging—and they’re living their best lives.


A survey of 2,000 people 65 and older found nearly three-quarters (72%) of people feel younger than they are, with half saying they feel younger than 50-years-old.


The average person stops caring what others think of their age at 43, and over one-third of those polled said that being able to say what you want is one of the best things about getting older.














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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, December 1, 2021








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DECEMBER 1, 2021




What to Get Grandma or Grandpa for the Holidays …
and Why Comfy Slippers Aren't on the List

By Linda Mac Dougall

Selecting presents for elderly friends and relatives isn't easy and so it may be tempting to go with objects of comfort such as fuzzy slippers, big boxes of candy and the like. But as holistic health practitioner Linda Mac Dougall will tell you, it pays to be safe when it comes to satisfying the needs of this special population.


For example, Mac Dougall will say that you should pass on gifting a new pair of slippers — even though many grandmas and grandpas love to wear this comfortable footwear — unless you purchase an orthotic pair that will provide them with support and prevent falls.

Mac Dougall has worked with hundreds of patients who have opened her eyes to the unmet needs of older Americans. And at 73, she knows a thing or two about aging bodies from personal experience.




GrandPad tablet can be the best thing that
the senior citizens will want to use

By Sovan Mandal


The rapid advancement in technology is no doubt a boon but only for those who can make the most out of it. Unfortunately, senior citizens who are well past their prime rarely fall in the above category. Ironically, it is technology itself that has come to the rescue of the seniors in the form of the GrandPad tablet.


Now, there is nothing too revolutionary with the GrandPad. Rather, it’s just that the tablet has been optimized for operation by seniors who may already be suffering from cognitive and motor skill disabilities. The tablet works around those shortcomings by the use of extra large icons along with voice texting and captioning features. That is not all but video calling has also been made a lot simpler as well.

The GrandPad also makes it easy for the seniors to listen to music or play some games. They can also get along with some reading as well or share pictures with their near and dear ones. The tablet also comes pre-loaded with the apps that the user needs along with the user’s preferences and contacts. All of this makes the tablet useable right out of the box itself. Buyers will have to sign-up for the GrandPad subscription to avail of the device.



What's the Future for the Retirement Security of Women?

If you want to know what prospects for the retirement security of women in America look like, you couldn't do better than hearing what a bevy of brilliant experts said at the recent day-long virtual summit of the Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER).


I was fortunate to be a participant, where WISER (a Washington-based advocacy group) celebrated its 25th anniversary by looking at how far women have come in their ability to retire well and, sorry to say, how far they still have to go. After the summit, I followed up with some speakers for more of their insights.

Cindy Hounsell, WISER's energetic founder and a 2015 Next Avenue Influencer in Aging, reflected on what things were like when her organization began in the late 1990s and how she sees the future for the retirement security of women.




Understanding costs of assisted living

Skilled nursing facilities are nursing homes for people whose health has deteriorated to the point where they require care from a nurse.


The other type is assisted living facilities, which offer care to people who are unable to perform some of the activities of daily living like eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, ambulating and continence, but this assistance could be rendered by people who have not been trained as nurses.

Some people choose to live in an assisted living facility for comfort, convenience or companionship, while other people need to go to an assisted living facility because adequate care is not available at home.






OK boomer: 'thirtysomething' sequel to reunite original cast

ABC has given the go-ahead to a pilot for “thirtysomething(else),” a sequel to the series that followed a group of baby boomers and their struggles.



The show will feature a group of new actors playing the grown-up, 30-something children of the original cast. Ken Olin, Mel Harris, Timothy Busfield and Patricia Wettig have signed on to reprise their roles. The Philadelphia-set series that ran from 1987-91 earned 13 Emmy Awards, including best drama, and two Golden Globes.


“I’m very excited. We’re all very excited,” Busfield said Wednesday when he appeared at a TV critics meeting to promote his other new ABC show “For Life.”









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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, November 30, 2021








MONDAY’S RANT


On Monday afternoon, I presented the proposed modification to our dining room rule (see Monday’s post for details) to our residents at our monthly meeting. After reading the statement, I asked for feedback. After one or two residents voiced their opinions, a vote was taken. With an almost 100% approval to modify the rule, my proposal was entered into to official minutes. A copy of those minutes are presented to management for review. The ultimate decision whether to amend the rule lies with our administrator…………….




NOVEMBER 30, 2021

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How To Avoid Mistakes When Enrolling in Medicare
By Dena Bunis

Missing deadlines, delaying enrollment or choosing the wrong plan can cost you a bundle when it comes to Medicare. Here’s a list of 10 common mistakes new Medicare enrollees make and how to avoid them, according to the Medicare Rights Center, a nonpartisan, not-for-profit consumer service organization.

1. Not signing up for Medicare at the right time


Timing, as they say, is everything. It’s especially important when it comes to enrolling in Medicare. As you approach 65, you’ll want to enroll during what the government calls your initial enrollment period (IEP). This seven-month period goes from three months before the month in which you turn 65 until three months after.

If you don’t sign up during your IEP, you will get another chance to enroll during Medicare’s annual general enrollment period, from Jan. 1 through March 31 of each year. However, if you enroll at that time, your coverage won’t begin until July. And, because you enrolled late, your monthly premiums for Medicare Part B — which covers your doctor visits and other outpatient services—will likely cost you more.




High-end assisted living facilities
popping up around the country

Most people like to vacation in places that feature indoor pools, spa facilities and restaurants that provide a choice of gourmet meals every night.

And others like to retire there.


To cater to those seniors, a new batch of assisted living facilities have opened around the county that turn the concept of a nursing home on its head, the New York Times reports.

In Brooklyn Heights, the former Leverich Towers Hotel — a 16-story Romanesque Revival structure with Venitian-influenced towers designed by the same architecture firm that drew up plans for Lord & Taylor and Saks Fifth Avenue stores in Manhattan — is now home to the Watermark, where residents can eat, swim and relax while a team of caretakers makes sure every day is better than the last.




New Mexico least affordable for assisted living,
New Jersey most expensive, analysis finds



New Mexico is the least affordable state for assisted living, and Utah is the most affordable, according to a new analysis by Seniorly that compares median income with cost in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.


It takes 13.6 years for someone to save enough to be able to afford one year of living in an assisted living community in New Mexico, whereas in Utah, it takes 7.2 years, according to the senior living search site.

The results are based on an analysis of the median wage in each state using the most recent U.S. Census Bureau data, the national average savings rate of 7.5% from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the average cost of assisted living communities in every state.  




Demand for Liver Transplant Rises Sharply
Among Older Americans
By Dennis Thompson

More older folks are winding up on liver transplant waiting lists than ever before, as obesity and alcoholism supersede hepatitis C as the main cause of liver failure in the United States.


The percentage of liver transplant candidates aged 65 or older rose from 9% in the early 2000s to 23% by 2020, researchers found. Most seniors' liver failure is due to fatty liver disease, in which excess fat stored in the liver causes inflammation and eventually scarring.

About 39% of older liver transplant candidates had fatty liver disease in 2020, compared with 13% in the early 2000s.




Smartphone memory apps can help older adults
with mild dementia to complete daily tasks

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Results from a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society show that older adults with mild dementia can learn to use smartphone memory aids to help them remember to complete everyday tasks that are important to their quality of life.


In the study, 52 older adults with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia were coached on how to use a digital voice recorder app or a reminder app.


After a four-week intervention, participants reported improvements in performing daily intentions. They also performed relatively well when the investigators assigned them with tasks, with performance levels favoring the reminder app in week 1, but reversing to favor the digital voice recorder app in week 4. Greater usage of the digital recorder or reminder apps was associated with better memory and greater improvements in activities of daily living.








Here's What We Wish We Could Forget About Life In The '60s
By Liz Marple


What part of your life (if any) was spent in the 1960s? I was born in 1961, so the '60s were pretty much my childhood. I must say, overall, I had a great childhood. I was fortunate to have a dad with a good job, and a mom who stayed home with me and my siblings. By today's standards, we didn't have a lot. We didn't take vacations other than to visit family. We didn't go to Disneyland every year. We didn't ski every winter or go to Hawaii every summer. But it was a pretty carefree existence, filled with family and friends. We had enough.



If you were a young child in the '60s, maybe your life was like mine. But if you were older, you were probably more aware of all the changes that were happening during that decade. You might have even participated in civil rights demonstrations or protests against the Vietnam War. Maybe you were even a "hippie" back then.


But there were also some things about the '60s that we look back on with a different perspective — things we wish we could forget about that time. Here are some of the quirky '60s things we wish we could forget. Did you already forget them?










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NEXT NEW BLOG WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Monday, November 29, 2021









I haven’t written a RANT editorial for some time. Therefore, for me to do so means that something has got me so riled up, so incensed, so angry that I felt the need to do so at this time. As always, forgive me if this is appears to be personal rather than general and too localized to be of interest to a diverse audience. But this is my blog and my forum and what I have to say concerns the well-being of the people I have the honor of living with here at the A.L.F.

 This facility runs on rules and regulations. Most of which are dictated by the Department of Health that licenses and oversees the operations of this and all long-term care facilities in our state. Those regulations go directly to the health and safety of our residents and include such things as dispensing of medication, cleanliness and food preparation, and most recently Infection control protocols. Strict adherence to these regulations has made this facility one of the safest in the state. And we should all be thankful for that. However, there are other rules, not set by the state or any outside body, and are put in place for the sole purpose of maintaining a smooth and efficient operating environment for staff and residents alike. It is to one of those rules that I would like to speak about. It is a rule that has gone far beyond its original intention.

It’s the rule that governs arriving late to meals. The rule states, “If you arrive at our dining room more that 15 minutes after the time it opens you will be considered late and will not be permitted to eat at your regular table with the people you know and with all the amenities that go with the usual dining room service. Instead, late comers will be banished to the Country Kitchen to eat their meals alone”

This rule was enacted to ensure the dining room staff has enough time to finish serving, clear the tables, clean and set up for the next seating. And if that were the only reason for the rule, I would have no problem with it. However, the way the rule has been enforced in recent months has gone far beyond its original intention. Instead of being a way to ensure the efficiency of the dining room it is used, not only as a way for managers and supervisors to assert their authority, but also as a way of punishing many of our residents who have legitimate reasons for being late to a meal. Those reasons center mostly around mobility issues, which may cause some residents to take a little longer traveling to the dining room. Simply put, people are punished for being disabled.
 
I will not go into the specific incident which occurred on Thursday (Thanksgiving) morning and prompted me to bring this up today. To do so would unfairly single out individuals, which is not my intention. Instead, I would like to propose that this rule be amended to accommodate those individuals whose circumstances, at times, may cause them to come to the dining room a little past the deadline. And by “A little past” I mean this. “As long as there is at least one server actively serving seated diners, then any resident with obvious mobility problems should be seated at their usual table and served accordingly.”

This does not mean that residents who are consistently late, or are late because they overslept or were delayed in a manner not related to their disability be accommodated as proposed.

Amending the rule in this manner will have no effect on the time it takes the dining room staff to prepare for the next meal. And would show the often spoken of but rarely practiced compassion and respect by the staff and management of this facility still exists………… …..


 
NOVEMBER 29, 2021

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Mental health of older adults significantly
impacted by COVID-19 pandemic

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the mental health of older people living in the community, with those who are lonely faring far worse, according to new research from McMaster University.


Using data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a national team of researchers found that 43% of adults aged 50 or older experienced moderate or high levels of depressive symptoms at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and that increased over time.

Loneliness was the most significant predictor of worsening depressive symptoms, with other pandemic-related stressors, such as family conflict, also increasing the odds.



How to Best Handle Social Security in 2022
By Stephen Silver

Next year will see many changes to Social Security. On the bright side, for recipients, is the cost-of-living adjustment of 5.9 percent, the highest in nearly forty years. This came as a result of inflation, to which the COLA formula is pegged.


In addition, the full retirement age has risen, the maximum taxable earnings cap is rising as well, while monthly payouts for wealthier individuals will go up as well. This is on top of the report earlier this fall that stated the main trust fund for Social Security will become dissipated in 2034, a year earlier than previously believed, as a result of the pandemic.

Looking ahead to next year, there has been some concern that even with the COLA increase, inflation and increasing Medicare Part B premiums will cause Social Security checks to not go as far in 2022.   




What Older Adults Should Know About
Medicare Preventive Services


There are steps that all of us can take to promote healthy aging, including eating nutritious foods, getting regular exercise and keeping up with our medical visits. Prevention is the key to finding medical problems early. You should be sure to take advantage of the important preventive services that Medicare covers.


Preventive services weren't always covered by Medicare, which used to mainly focus on diagnosis and treatment, with few services aimed at prevention. That changed in 2010, when the Affordable Care Act added preventive services for all Medicare beneficiaries. 


It can be confusing, however, to know exactly which services and screenings Medicare covers, when they're covered and what to expect. That's why the Alliance for Aging Research, a nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health, created the fact sheet, "Wellness Wisdom: A Guide to Preventive and Screening Services Covered by Medicare" to help older adults and their families learn more about prevention through Medicare.  



Tips for picking Medicare plan
this open-enrollment season
by Emily Scott

Choosing the right Medicare plan can be confusing, and during the open-enrollment period, it is recommended that senior citizens take the time they need to find the plan best for them.


Now through December 7, people over 65 and people with some disabilities can sign up or make any changes to their Medicare plan at Medicare.gov.

Bill Johnston-Walsh, state director of AARP Pennsylvania, said when deciding between different Medicare plans, it is important to consider how much coverage you are looking for, the costs, and how convenient it is for your personal life.



No One Cares!
By Arthur C. Brooks

Our fears about what other people think of us are overblown and rarely worth fretting over.



A friend of mine once shared what I considered a bit of unadulterated wisdom: “If I wouldn’t invite someone into my house, I shouldn’t let them into my head.” But that’s easier said than done. Social media has opened up our heads so that just about any trespasser can wander in. If you tweet whatever crosses your mind about a celebrity, it could quite possibly reach the phone in her hand as she sits on her couch in her house.

The real problem isn’t technology—it’s human nature. We are wired to care about what others think of us. As the Roman Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius observed almost 2,000 years ago, “We all love ourselves more than other people, but care more about their opinion than our own,” whether they are friends, strangers, or enemies.







Most tattooed senior citizens


Charlotte Guttenberg is the most tattooed senior citizen (female) and her partner Chuck Helmke is the most tattooed male senior citizen (male).

Charlotte has 98.75% of her body tattooed and is in fact the most tattooed woman ever. Chuck has 97.5% tattoo coverage and also holds the record for the most skulls tattooed on the body.
Charlotte and Chuck have spent nearly 2,000 hours combined in tattoo chairs!
Despite being adorned from head to toe in beautiful art, the couple don’t notice the tattoos when they look at each other.










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Good Day. It’s Sunday, November 28, 2021






NOVEMBER 28, 2021
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5 Things to Know About Leftovers
BY AMY ROBERTS

Whether you’re cooking the big family meal or attending it, there’s one thing that everyone looks forward to the day after Thanksgiving (hint: it’s not Black Friday): the delicious leftovers!

The last thing you want, however, is a queasy stomach (or worse), thanks to improper food handling. To keep your tummy happy the second — or third — time around, follow this advice from Deirdre Schlunegger, CEO of Stop Foodborne Illness.

1. Keep an eye on the clock.

Once food is cooked thoroughly and served, it has about two hours at room temperature before bacteria can start to grow and make it less safe to eat. Ideally, that means keeping food on properly calibrated hot plates while it’s out (so it doesn’t cool below 165°F) or getting it into containers and into the fridge as soon as dinner is over. But because these things are not always possible, what you do next is especially important.



What to do with that turkey: Here’s What You Should Do with Your Turkey Immediately After Dinner Today

2. Store it safer.

Not only should leftovers be stashed in the fridge as soon as dinner is over, but you also want to get them down to a safe temperature — 40°F or lower — as quickly as possible. “The smaller the portion size, the faster it will cool,” says Schlunegger. To speed up that process, foods should be stored in a layer no more than two inches deep. Slice up thick pieces of meat and use shallow bowls for soups or sauces. Use airtight containers, and be sure there’s space around containers in the fridge itself so the cool air can circulate freely.







Do all Medicare plans have a deductible?
By Maite Knorr-Evans

Medicare is divided into four parts, all of which have a deductible and premium, However, Part A and B are mandatory, Part C and D can be purchased to provide increased coverage.
What are the various 'Parts' of Medicare

There are three major 'Parts' of Medicare:

    Part A: which covers hospital stays, skilled nursing, and hospice services;



    Part B: which covers outpatient services, most doctors visits, and most drugs that need to be administered by medical professionals; and

    Part D: which covers most “self-administered” prescriptions.

Some seniors elect to add additional coverage for things like vision and dental through a Part C or Medicare Advantage plan.





Poor sleep linked to feeling older and worse
outlook on ageing, which can impact health


Poor sleep in the over 50s is linked to more negative perceptions of aging, which in turn can impact physical, mental and cognitive health, new research has revealed.



A study led by the University of Exeter and found that people who rated their sleep the worst also felt older, and perceived their own physical and mental aging more negatively.


Lead author Serena Sabatini, of the University of Exeter, said: "As we age, we all experience both positive and negative changes in many areas of our lives. However, some people perceive more negative changes than others. As we know that having a negative perception of aging can be detrimental to future physical health, mental health, and cognitive health, an open question in aging research is to understand what makes people more negative about aging. Our research suggests that poor sleepers feel older, and have a more negative perception of their aging. We need to study this further—one explanation could be that a more negative outlook influences both. However, it could be a sign that addressing sleep difficulties could promote a better perception of aging, which could have other health benefits."



How the COVID-19 pandemic made seniors
more food insecure than ever before

By Tania Collazo


Sign up for our PoliticsNY newsletter for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across NYC

Thanksgiving’s often a time for generations of family to come together, eat their favorite family meals, and spend some quality time together. But for many, this time of year is a painful reminder of the isolation they face and the food insecurity they struggle with. In fact, one in eight older New Yorkers are unsure where their next meal will come from.



The pandemic shined a light on the reality of senior isolation, many of whom also face a lack of regular access to food. We can and must do more as a society to fight this pervasive issue, especially around the holidays.

Food insecurity is a growing issue in New York and the United States that particularly afflicts low income individuals and seniors. Across the US, 7.3 million older adults are struggling with reliable access to nutritious food. Older adults of color, as well as older adults with disabilities, are three times as likely to be food insecure.



Continued pandemic pressures pushing
senior living communities into ‘jeopardy’



While senior living providers await Phase 4 Provider Relief Fund distributions, senior living advocates are calling for targeted funding to help an industry still battling pandemic operational and occupancy challenges.



Argentum President and CEO James Balda noted that it has been a year since the last round of relief, and since then, expenses and losses incurred by senior living providers have only compounded, pushing more communities into “jeopardy.”


“They simply cannot afford to wait any longer, and that’s why we urge the administration to use its discretion to direct relief to these frontline caregivers who have been left behind time and again,” Balda told McKnight’s Senior Living.



COVID 2.0: The Holidays Don’t
Have to Be a Repeat of Last Year



Regarding holiday gatherings, therapists suggest researching the risk of COVID-19 vs. the risk of exacerbating loneliness and depression


When most people think of the holiday season 2020, one word comes to mind: Disappointment. No matter if family and friends lived near or far away, many people adhered to the isolation measures recommended last year, which was to have close contact only with those in your immediate household.


The holidays are once again approaching and while many have plans for gatherings this year, some are still on the fence.










How Coffee and Tea Can Help Lower
the Risk of Stroke, Dementia
By Tony Hicks
Read more  >>  https://www.healthline.com/health-news/how-coffee-and-tea-can-help-lower-the-risk-of-stroke-dementia
===========================================================
Therapy stigma rampant among older adults:
 Just 8% of baby boomers willing to see therapist

Read more  >>  https://www.studyfinds.org/therapy-stigman-baby-boomers-millennials-mental-health/
===========================================================
Nearly half of all Americans expect to retire in debt,
survey finds
By Jessica Dickler
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/16/46-percent-of-americans-expect-to-retire-in-debt.html
===========================================================
How much is taken out of your Social Security
check for Medicare?
By Maite Knorr-Evans
Read more  >>  https://en.as.com/en/2021/11/16/latest_news/1637097889_315641.html
===========================================================
Health Benefits Of Tai Chi For Seniors
By Kimberly Dawn Neumann
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/health/healthy-aging/tai-chi-for-seniors/
===========================================================
The Corporate Plan to Murder Medicare
Runs Through Medicare Advantage

Read more  >>  https://www.commondreams.org/views/2021/11/19/corporate-plan-murder-medicare-runs-through-medicare-advantage
===========================================================
The House Build Back Better Bill Makes
Historic Changes For Older Adults
But Care Gaps Remain

By Howard Gleckman
Read more >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2021/11/19/the-house-build-back-better-bill-makes-historic-changes-for-older-adults-but-care-gaps-remain/?sh=695d92d267c6
===========================================================
Caregivers relieved as nursing home restrictions
lifted in New York

Read more  >>  https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/central-ny/news/2021/11/17/state-nursing-homes-lift-visitation-restrictions
===========================================================
The New Social Security Statements:
Reasons to Check Yours Out

Read more  >> https://www.nextavenue.org/new-social-security-statements/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=12f83a87b0-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-12f83a87b0-165407981&mc_cid=12f83a87b0&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===========================================================
How to explain cryptocurrency to senior citizens
By Vivek Kaul
Read more  >>  https://www.livemint.com/market/cryptocurrency/how-to-explain-crypto-to-senior-citizens-11637247560056.html
===========================================================
Insurance industry should listen to seniors
and abolish use of credit scores

Read more  >>  https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/insurance-industry-should-listen-to-seniors-and-abolish-use-of-credit-scores/
===========================================================
Many older adults plan to travel soon,
but with COVID-19 precautions

Read more  >>  https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/11/17/covid19-older-adults-travel-soon-poll/7681637169923/
===========================================================
The Most Common Pain Relief Drug in
The World Induces Risky Behavior

By Peter Dockrill
Read more  >>  https://www.sciencealert.com/the-most-common-pain-relief-drug-in-the-world-induces-risky-behavior-study-finds
===========================================================
Inflation and Retirement:
How to Protect Your Savings

By John F. Wasik
Read more >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/19/business/inflation-retirement-savings.html
===========================================================
Bullying is surprisingly common among seniors,
including at assisted living facilities

Read more  >>  https://www.floridatoday.com/story/life/wellness/2021/10/26/bullying-common-among-seniors-including-assisted-living-facilities/6123165001/
===========================================================
US opens COVID boosters to all adults,
urges them for 50+

By LAURAN NEERGAARD, MATTHEW PERRONE and MIKE STOBBE
Read more  >>  https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-boosters-adults-cdc-fda-pfizer-moderna-34aabde2c1c5a88c7763fa1dac77df5f
===========================================================
High-protein diet and exercise may 'cut risk of
heart disease and diabetes' in older adults

Read more  >>  https://inews.co.uk/news/health/high-protein-diet-and-exercise-could-reduce-risk-of-heart-disease-and-diabetes-in-older-adults-1310468
===========================================================
Smartphone memory apps can help older adults
with mild dementia to complete daily tasks

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211117/Smartphone-memory-apps-can-help-older-adults-with-mild-dementia-to-complete-daily-tasks.aspx
===========================================================
Housework linked to sharper memory and
better falls protection in older adults

Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-11-housework-linked-sharper-memory-falls.html







10 Best Entertainment Apps for Older People

Applications, or Apps for short, can be a great way for older people to interact with others and keep entertained. This is more true now than ever as traditional social options are limited due to Coronavirus restrictions. Phones and tablets have become a life line for many; from games and activities for the kids, to online tours for frustrated travellers, to free video calling for families. There are literally millions of Apps out there, so where to start?



Age Space has compiled our top 10 entertainment App recommendations for older people. Below you will find all manner of mobile apps to stay entertained, including games, puzzles, and things to listen to.






1. Words with Friends
2. Elevate - Brain Training
3. Spotify
4. Fun Bridge
5. Duolingo
6. Solitaire
7. Audible
8. Word Brain
9. Houseparty






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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29. 2021





-30-
















Good Day. It’s Monday, November 29, 2021



Calendar here



Quote here





RANT NOTICE




I haven’t written a RANT editorial for some time. Therefore, for me to do so means that something has got me so riled up, so incensed, so angry that I felt the need to do so at this time. As always, forgive me if this is appears to be personal rather than general and too localized to be of interest to a diverse audience. But this is my blog and my forum and what I have to say concerns the well-being of the people I have the honor of living with here at the A.L.F.

 This facility runs on rules and regulations. Most of which are dictated by the Department of Health that licenses and oversees the operations of this and all long-term care facilities in our state. Those regulations go directly to the health and safety of our residents and include such things as dispensing of medication, cleanliness and food preparation, and most recently Infection control protocols. Strict adherence to these regulations has made this facility one of the safest in the state. And we should all be thankful for that. However, there are other rules, not set by the state or any outside body, and are put in place for the sole purpose of maintaining a smooth and efficient operating environment for staff and residents alike. It is to one of those rules that I would like to speak about. It is a rule that has gone far beyond its original intention.

It’s the rule that governs arriving late to meals. The rule states, “If you arrive at our dining room more that 15 minutes after the time it opens you will be considered late and will not be permitted to eat at your regular table with the people you know and with all the amenities that go with the usual dining room service. Instead, late comers will be banished to the Country Kitchen to eat their meals alone”

This rule was enacted to ensure the dining room staff has enough time to finish serving, clear the tables, clean and set up for the next seating. And if that were the only reason for the rule, I would have no problem with it. However, the way the rule has been enforced in recent months has gone far beyond its original intention. Instead of being a way to ensure the efficiency of the dining room it is used, not only as a way for managers and supervisors to assert their authority, but also as a way of punishing many of our residents who have legitimate reasons for being late to a meal. Those reasons center mostly around mobility issues, which may cause some residents to take a little longer traveling to the dining room. Simply put, people are punished for being disabled.
 
I will not go into the specific incident which occurred on Thursday (Thanksgiving) morning and prompted me to bring this up today. To do so would unfairly single out individuals, which is not my intention. Instead, I would like to propose that this rule be amended to accommodate those individuals whose circumstances, at times, may cause them to come to the dining room a little past the deadline. And by “A little past” I mean this. “As long as there is at least one server actively serving seated diners, then any resident with obvious mobility problems should be seated at their usual table and severed accordingly.”

This does not mean that residents who are consistently late, or are late because they overslept or were delayed in a manner not related to their disability be accommodated as proposed.

Amending the rule in this manner will have no effect on the time it takes the dining room staff to prepare for the next meal. And would show the often spoken of but rarely practiced compassion and respect by the staff and management of this facility still exists………… …..bwc


 


NOVEMBER 29, 2021


Senior news
Please note: by clicking on links you will be redirected to another website.
Click “back arrow” (←) to return to TheSeniorLog.com







Mental health of older adults significantly
impacted by COVID-19 pandemic
Reviewed by Emily Henderson

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the mental health of older people living in the community, with those who are lonely faring far worse, according to new research from McMaster University.

pic A


Using data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a national team of researchers found that 43% of adults aged 50 or older experienced moderate or high levels of depressive symptoms at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and that increased over time.

Loneliness was the most significant predictor of worsening depressive symptoms, with other pandemic-related stressors, such as family conflict, also increasing the odds.

Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211125/Mental-health-of-older-adults-significantly-impacted-by-COVID-19-pandemic.aspx


How to Best Handle Social Security in 2022
by Stephen Silver


Next year will see many changes to Social Security. On the bright side, for recipients, is the cost-of-living adjustment of 5.9 percent, the highest in nearly forty years. This came as a result of inflation, to which the COLA formula is pegged.

pic B>

 

In addition, the full retirement age has risen, the maximum taxable earnings cap is rising as well, while monthly payouts for wealthier individuals will go up as well. This is on top of the report earlier this fall that stated the main trust fund for Social Security will become dissipated in 2034, a year earlier than previously believed, as a result of the pandemic.

Looking ahead to next year, there has been some concern that even with the COLA increase, inflation and increasing Medicare Part B premiums will cause Social Security checks to not go as far in 2022.   

Read more  >>  https://nationalinterest.org/blog/politics/how-best-handle-social-security-2022-197160


What Older Adults Should Know About
Medicare Preventive Services


There are steps that all of us can take to promote healthy aging, including eating nutritious foods, getting regular exercise and keeping up with our medical visits. Prevention is the key to finding medical problems early. You should be sure to take advantage of the important preventive services that Medicare covers.

pic C


Preventive services weren't always covered by Medicare, which used to mainly focus on diagnosis and treatment, with few services aimed at prevention. That changed in 2010, when the Affordable Care Act added preventive services for all Medicare beneficiaries.  

It can be confusing, however, to know exactly which services and screenings Medicare covers, when they're covered and what to expect. That's why the Alliance for Aging Research, a nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health, created the fact sheet, "Wellness Wisdom: A Guide to Preventive and Screening Services Covered by Medicare" to help older adults and their families learn more about prevention through Medicare.  

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/older-adults-medicare-preventive-services/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=daf40d730b-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_23_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-daf40d730b-165407981&mc_cid=daf40d730b&mc_eid=94767a79b9


Tips for picking Medicare plan this open-enrollment season
by Emily Scott


Choosing the right Medicare plan can be confusing, and during the open-enrollment period, it is recommended that senior citizens take the time they need to find the plan best for them.

pic D>




Now through December 7, people over 65 and people with some disabilities can sign up or make any changes to their Medicare plan at Medicare.gov.

Bill Johnston-Walsh, state director of AARP Pennsylvania, said when deciding between different Medicare plans, it is important to consider how much coverage you are looking for, the costs, and how convenient it is for your personal life.

Read more  >>  https://kiowacountypress.net/content/tips-picking-medicare-plan-open-enrollment-season



No One Cares!
By Arthur C. Brooks


Our fears about what other people think of us are overblown and rarely worth fretting over.

pic E



A friend of mine once shared what I considered a bit of unadulterated wisdom: “If I wouldn’t invite someone into my house, I shouldn’t let them into my head.” But that’s easier said than done. Social media has opened up our heads so that just about any trespasser can wander in. If you tweet whatever crosses your mind about a celebrity, it could quite possibly reach the phone in her hand as she sits on her couch in her house.

The real problem isn’t technology—it’s human nature. We are wired to care about what others think of us. As the Roman Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius observed almost 2,000 years ago, “We all love ourselves more than other people, but care more about their opinion than our own,” whether they are friends, strangers, or enemies.

Read more  >>  https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2021/11/how-stop-caring-what-other-people-think-you/620670/?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter




Monday extra



Most tattooed senior citizens
Charlotte Guttenberg is the most tattooed senior citizen (female) and her partner Chuck Helmke is the most tattooed male senior citizen (male).
Charlotte has 98.75% of her body tattooed and is in fact the most tattooed woman ever. Chuck has 97.5% tattoo coverage and also holds the record for the most skulls tattooed on the body.
Charlotte and Chuck have spent nearly 2,000 hours combined in tattoo chairs!
Despite being adorned from head to toe in beautiful art, the couple don’t notice the tattoos when they look at each other.


https://youtu.be/eirYz9ykKUA



FYI






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Good Day. It’s Thursday, November 25, 2021












Remember this word, “super-spreader?” It’s usually associated with large groups of unvaccinated, unmasked people who have gathered together indoors or out for an event like a concert, sporting event or right-wing political rallies. Super-spreader events are the primary breeding grounds for COVID-19 to spread quickly around a specific community or group. Typically, we see the number of cases spike a week or two after these events. And this year will be no different. Only the venues will have changed. This year, along with the packed football stadiums and arenas, are the kitchens and dining rooms of thousands of Americans across the country. This year, Thanksgiving will be our next super-spreader event.

 
For some reason, Americans have decided the Pandemic is over (or under control) and it suddenly is okay to pack a room full of people, sit them as close as they can to one another, and pass food around so that everybody can get a good dose of virus with their candied yams.


Sure, people will say they will be cautious. They may even tell you everybody invited has been vaccinated. But let’s be practical. Are you really going to ask 97-year-old aunt Bertha to produce proof of vaccination? And what about the mom who is vaccinated, but she’s afraid to let little Jimmy get the shot even though his pediatrician says it’s okay. Are you going to throw them out of your festive get-together? And what about those hands? Where have they been? Maybe they were touching the stair rails of the subway they traveled on to get to your dinner. Or perhaps one of your guests bought that bottle of Gallo Burgundy from an unvaccinated clerk at the shop around the corner who just sneezed on that very bottle of wine that now adorns your table. The whole thing is just one giant Petrie dish.
 

There are now available, home, rapid-result COVID tests. You can buy them at many drugstores. However, they are expensive ($25 each) and are you going to be the one who will poke a giant Q-Tip up the snout of your Trump-loving uncle Billy Ray Bob and make him wait in the corner for the results? Good luck with that.

Hey, don’t let me spoil your Turkey Day meal. Eat, drink, laugh. But remember that uninvited guest waiting to make an appearance with every exhaled breath or unwashed hand. And maybe pass around the hand sanitizer along with the string bean casserole………………….




Turning to turkey's tryptophan to boost mood?
 Not so fast

By Andrew Neff

Every Thanksgiving, myths of the quasi-magical powers of tryptophan rise again.



There’s the turkey/drowsiness myth: Eating lots of juicy turkey meat supposedly makes people feel tired because it contains an amino acid called tryptophan. This molecule travels into the brain, where it’s converted into a neurotransmitter called serotonin, which in turn is converted into a hormone called melatonin. Voilà! Sleepiness.

But science and the internet agree: It’s not the turkey’s tryptophan to blame for your post-feast nap. All protein sources, and even vegetables, contain some tryptophan; turkey isn’t at all special in this regard.




7 Thanksgiving Activities for Aging Adults


With the holidays approaching, family caregivers should be thinking about fun and engaging activities their elderly loved ones can enjoy. Doing these activities can keep their brains active and provide social connections. Here are some activities seniors can do on Thanksgiving.

1. Plan a Scavenger Hunt


For this hunt, print off turkey pictures and post them in rooms throughout the home. The guests can team up to find the turkey pictures, or everyone can play solo. If you want to make this more challenging for your loved one, place a clue on the pictures asking players to locate a hidden item. A scavenger hunt is a stimulating game that exercises the brain. Your loved one can use his or her critical thinking skills tracking down the pictures and other objects.

Staying socially active and engaging in fun activities are vital for a senior’s wellbeing. In Altamonte Springs, FL, home care agencies can be a great boon to seniors. With the help of the caregivers at Home Care Assistance, your aging loved one can lead a happier and healthier life. We offer a revolutionary program called the Balanced Care Method, which encourages seniors to eat nutritious foods, exercise and socialize regularly, and focus on other lifestyle factors that increase life expectancy.



Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes Ideas

Chances are you’ll still be swimming in leftovers from the delicious Thanksgiving feast you have a week after. I love a Thanksgiving sandwich as much as the next person, but sometimes (especially if you hosted the dinner) you have way more leftovers than you know what to do with. Here are some fun day-after-Thanksgiving leftover recipes to free up space in your fridge and to make your taste buds happy.

Turkey Soup


Every year, after I host Thanksgiving, I make soup out of the turkey carcass. There’s nothing like homemade turkey soup. You can even use leftover mashed potatoes or stuffing to thicken up the broth if you’d like. Here’s the turkey soup recipe I used this year – it’s classic and simple, but you can make it your own very easily.
Cranberry-Carrot Muffins

I always seem to make too much cranberry sauce; I really love it as a dipping sauce, but they always just seem to be too much of it. This ingenious muffin recipe uses up the tart sauce as well as leftover cooked carrots!




The Fast Formula for Getting Your
Kitchen Back in Shape After Thanksgiving

By Shifrah Combiths


Preparing for Thanksgiving is by no means a one-day affair. If you’re hosting, you’ve been getting your house and kitchen ready, and spent days making lists, shopping, and cooking. Once the feasting is over, the last thing you want to do is spend hours cleaning up—and you shouldn’t have to! Here’s our fail-proof, get-it-done method for getting your kitchen back in shape so you can relax.


First, Your New Motto:

Four Words: Clean as You Go

This should be a standard working-in-the-kitchen habit, but when you’re making large portions of multiple dishes, the principle will save you from epic messes and keep your kitchen running smoothly even as you’re still cooking.



Clean up small messes as you go. Put a paper towel under the teaspoon you’re using to measure vanilla, and wipe spills from counters right away with the rag you have at arms length. Also clean cooking utensils as you’re done with them. I like to fill one side of my sink with hot soapy water and toss used tools in there until I’m done cooking.




Thanksgiving Dinner for One

Thanksgiving Dinner For OnePhoto by Chelsea Kyle, Prop Styling by Anna Surbatovich, Food Styling by Olivia Mack Anderson

    Total Time

    1 hour 30 minutes



All the elements of a classic Thanksgiving feast, conveniently portioned just for one, including your own mini sweet potato casserole. Because dining alone shouldn't mean you miss out on all the holiday favorites.
Ingredients

1 serving

1 sweet potato

1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

1 teaspoon finely chopped thyme, plus 1 sprig

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper.....







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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, November 24, 2021








I’m 76-years-old, and the one thing that I always found amazing about our democracy was the way we are able to transfer power from an outgoing president to a new one. No threatening of military takeover, no rioting because our candidate did not win, and certainly no refusal to believe the election was stolen.

I would laugh when I read how the “Presidente” of some banana republic would call out the military to assure he would stay in power despite a loss at the polls. Some of those guys would go so far as assassinating their opponents before, during or after an election. And then proceeding to declare themselves “President for life.” Surely, I thought, that could never happen here. But now, I’m not so sure. The January 6th insurrection by deranged supporters of the former president and the subsequent refusal of many Republicans to acknowledge there even was a riot has me very worried about our future.


By that one single act of not conceding his loss and subsequent non-support for the new administration, Mr. Trump has caused a rift in the very fiber of American democracy, once the envy of the world. Not only has the opposition decided not to support any new bills Mr. Biden has proposed, but to absolutely refuse to compromise or to even offer a similar bill. They act as if Mr. Biden is president of only part of America. The part that didn’t vote for Trump. The last time we saw anything like this was when Lincoln was president. And we all know what happened to that.

I was debating whether to use the cliché “Crossroad” when referring to where we are as a nation today. Actually, I think we are approaching an off ramp rather than a crossroad, and we can’t decide if we should stay on the freeway or get off at the next exit. Some Americans have already made that choice, preferring “This Way to Whackyland” to an American democracy that has sustained us for nearly 250 years. We need to slow down, check the rearview mirror and realize that what we can’t go back 75 years to an America that was mostly white, Christian and very naïve……………………..
 



NOVEMBER 24, 2021


US opens COVID boosters to all adults,
urges them for 50+

By LAURAN NEERGAARD, MATTHEW PERRONE and MIKE STOBBE

The U.S. on Friday opened COVID-19 booster shots to all adults and took the extra step of urging people 50 and older to seek one, aiming to ward off a winter surge as coronavirus cases rise even before millions of Americans travel for the holidays.



Until now, Americans faced a confusing list of who was eligible for a booster that varied by age, their health and which kind of vaccine they got first. The Food and Drug Administration authorized changes to Pfizer and Moderna boosters to make it easier.

Under the new rules, anyone 18 or older can choose either a Pfizer or Moderna booster six months after their last dose. For anyone who got the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine, the wait already was just two months. And people can mix-and-match boosters from any company.




High-protein diet and exercise may 'cut risk of
heart disease and diabetes' in older adults

A higher-protein diet alongside exercise may contribute to reducing the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults, according to research.


Higher-protein diets, containing lean meat, chicken, fish and dairy products, have soared in popularity across the globe in the past decade and the researchers said their findings are particularly important for the world’s ageing population.

Researchers from Liverpool Hope University and the University of Melbourne focused on a group of 100 older men and women from the UK with an average age of 68 years.



Smartphone memory apps can help older adults
with mild dementia to complete daily tasks

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Results from a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society show that older adults with mild dementia can learn to use smartphone memory aids to help them remember to complete everyday tasks that are important to their quality of life.



In the study, 52 older adults with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia were coached on how to use a digital voice recorder app or a reminder app.

After a four-week intervention, participants reported improvements in performing daily intentions. They also performed relatively well when the investigators assigned them with tasks, with performance levels favoring the reminder app in week 1, but reversing to favor the digital voice recorder app in week 4. Greater usage of the digital recorder or reminder apps was associated with better memory and greater improvements in activities of daily living.




Housework linked to sharper memory and
better falls protection in older adults

Housework is linked to sharper memory, attention span, and better leg strength, and by extension, greater protection against falls, in older adults, finds research published in the open access journal BMJ Open.


The findings were independent of other regular recreational and workplace physical activities, and active commuting.

Regular physical activity is good for maintaining optimal physical and mental health. And among older adults, it curbs the risks of long term conditions, falls, immobility, dependency and death.







The perfect hug lasts between
five and ten seconds, scientists say


If you want to give the perfect hug, embrace your partner for somewhere between  five and 10 seconds and don’t worry about arm position, a new study suggests.  




Psychologists in London looked at how much pleasure volunteers got from engaging in hugs of different durations and orientations.
 

Longer hugs, between five and 10 seconds, were more pleasant than very short hugs (one second), the experts found, but arm position doesn’t really seem to matter.













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NEXT NEW BLOG, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Thursday, November 25, 2021



Calendar here



Quote here





FROM THE EDITOR…

Turkey, With a Side of Caution





SPECIAL SENIOR T-DAY NEWS





Turning to turkey's tryptophan to boost mood?
 Not so fast
By Andrew Neff

Every Thanksgiving, myths of the quasi-magical powers of tryptophan rise again.

pic A


There’s the turkey/drowsiness myth: Eating lots of juicy turkey meat supposedly makes people feel tired because it contains an amino acid called tryptophan. This molecule travels into the brain, where it’s converted into a neurotransmitter called serotonin, which in turn is converted into a hormone called melatonin. Voila! Sleepiness.

But science and the internet agree: It’s not the turkey’s tryptophan to blame for your post-feast nap. All protein sources, and even vegetables, contain some tryptophan; turkey isn’t at all special in this regard.

Read more >>  https://theconversation.com/turning-to-turkeys-tryptophan-to-boost-mood-not-so-fast-125633?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter



7 Thanksgiving Activities for Aging Adults


With the holidays approaching, family caregivers should be thinking about fun and engaging activities their elderly loved ones can enjoy. Doing these activities can keep their brains active and provide social connections. Here are some activities seniors can do on Thanksgiving.

1. Plan a Scavenger Hunt

pic B>


For this hunt, print off turkey pictures and post them in rooms throughout the home. The guests can team up to find the turkey pictures, or everyone can play solo. If you want to make this more challenging for your loved one, place a clue on the pictures asking players to locate a hidden item. A scavenger hunt is a stimulating game that exercises the brain. Your loved one can use his or her critical thinking skills tracking down the pictures and other objects.

Staying socially active and engaging in fun activities are vital for a senior’s wellbeing. In Altamonte Springs, FL, home care agencies can be a great boon to seniors. With the help of the caregivers at Home Care Assistance, your aging loved one can lead a happier and healthier life. We offer a revolutionary program called the Balanced Care Method, which encourages seniors to eat nutritious foods, exercise and socialize regularly, and focus on other lifestyle factors that increase life expectancy.

Read more  >>  https://www.homecareassistanceorlando.com/thanksgiving-activities-for-seniors/



Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes Ideas

Chances are you’ll still be swimming in leftovers from the delicious Thanksgiving feast you have a week after. I love a Thanksgiving sandwich as much as the next person, but sometimes (especially if you hosted the dinner) you have way more leftovers than you know what to do with. Here are some fun day-after-Thanksgiving leftover recipes to free up space in your fridge and to make your taste buds happy.

Turkey Soup
pic C
Every year after I host Thanksgiving, I make soup out of the turkey carcass. There’s nothing like homemade turkey soup. You can even use leftover mashed potatoes or stuffing to thicken up the broth if you’d like. Here’s the turkey soup recipe I used this year – it’s classic and simple but you can make it your own very easily.
Cranberry-Carrot Muffins

I always seem to make too much cranberry sauce; I really love it as a dipping sauce, but they always just seem to be too much of it. This ingenious muffin recipe uses up the tart sauce as well as leftover cooked carrots!

Read more  >>  https://www.gourmetgiftbaskets.com/Blog/post/thanksgiving-leftover-recipes-ideas.aspx



The Fast Formula for Getting Your
Kitchen Back in Shape After Thanksgiving
By Shifrah Combiths


Preparing for Thanksgiving is by no means a one-day affair. If you’re hosting, you’ve been getting your house and kitchen ready, and spent days making lists, shopping, and cooking. Once the feasting is over, the last thing you want to do is spend hours cleaning up—and you shouldn’t have to! Here’s our fail-proof, get-it-done method for getting your kitchen back in shape so you can relax.


First, Your New Motto:

Four Words: Clean as You Go

This should be a standard working-in-the-kitchen habit, but when you’re making large portions of multiple dishes, the principle will save you from epic messes and keep your kitchen running smoothly even as you’re still cooking.

pic D>

Clean up small messes as you go. Put a paper towel under the teaspoon you’re using to measure vanilla, and wipe spills from counters right away with the rag you have at arms length. Also clean cooking utensils as you’re done with them. I like to fill one side of my sink with hot soapy water and toss used tools in there until I’m done cooking.



Read more  >>  https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/the-fast-formula-for-getting-your-kitchen-back-in-shape-after-thanksgiving-252680



Thanksgiving Dinner for One

Thanksgiving Dinner For OnePhoto by Chelsea Kyle, Prop Styling by Anna Surbatovich, Food Styling by Olivia Mack Anderson

    Total Time

    1 hour 30 minutes

pic E


All the elements of a classic Thanksgiving feast, conveniently portioned just for one, including your own mini sweet potato casserole. Because dining alone shouldn't mean you miss out on all the holiday favorites.
Ingredients

1 serving

1 sweet potato

1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

1 teaspoon finely chopped thyme, plus 1 sprig

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper.....

Read more  >>  https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/thanksgiving-dinner-for-one#main-content







Senior news



NOVEMBER 25, 2021






FYI




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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, November 23, 2021







NOVEMBER 22, 2021


Insurance industry should listen to seniors
and abolish use of credit scores



Many senior citizens on fixed incomes have spent their lives paying up front for goods. They’ve paid off their debts and rely less on credit. Some may now have lower credit scores because of the unscrupulous way credit bureaus rank people who routinely rely on credit and loans, compared to those who have paid their debts. Is it fair that they pay more for auto or homeowners insurance?


Lost in the recent talk about an emergency rule that bans insurance companies from using your credit score is a simple truth: The industry is already poised to abandon this outdated and unjust method to determine what you pay to protect your auto and home. In fact, they could do so today.

The insurance industry wants you to believe its corporate hands are tied by an emergency rule the Office of the Insurance Commissioner set last March. But their lobbyists, the American Property Casualty Insurance Association and the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies, never mention that insurers could use dozens of other more reliable risk factors to determine your premiums.



Many older adults plan to travel soon,
but with COVID-19 precautions


Nearly 1 in 3 older Americans plan an extended trip next year, and 1 in 4 plan to travel for the holidays, but many will take COVID-19 into account, a new survey shows.


If COVID-19 cases surge at their destination, 20% said they would definitely change their plans, and another 52% said they might do so.

"These poll findings are consistent with previous AARP research which shows that optimism for travel this year is growing, but COVID-19 precautions still take precedence for many older adults," Alison Bryant, senior vice president of research for AARP, which supported the poll, said Wednesday in a news release.




The Most Common Pain Relief Drug in
The World Induces Risky Behavior

By Peter Dockrill


One of the most consumed drugs in the US – and the most commonly taken analgesic worldwide – could be doing a lot more than simply taking the edge off your headache, according to scientists.


Acetaminophen, also known as paracetamol and sold widely under the brand names Tylenol and Panadol, also increases risk-taking, according to a study published in 2020 that measured changes in people's behavior when under the influence of the common over-the-counter medication.

"Acetaminophen seems to make people feel less negative emotion when they consider risky activities – they just don't feel as scared," neuroscientist Baldwin Way from The Ohio State University explained last year.




Inflation and Retirement:
How to Protect Your Savings

By John F. Wasik


How to Beat Retirement’s Nemesis: Inflation

With prices rising at their fastest rate in decades, people in retirement or approaching it should take extra care to protect their savings.


Even if you’re a retirement supersaver, inflation is always lurking like a chronic, incurable disease, eroding retirement benefits that often fail to keep up with the rising cost of living.

To many families, inflation’s effect on their nest egg is a taboo subject — if they think about it at all — because it raises the ugly prospect of outliving their savings. This year, it’s something no American of any age can ignore. U.S. inflation is rising at its fastest pace in roughly three decades, with consumer prices climbing 6.2 percent in the 12 months through October.




Bullying is surprisingly common among seniors,
including at assisted living facilities



Bullying among seniors in assisted living facilities happens more often than people might think.


Q:  My grandmother lives in assisted living and says a woman resident there bullies her. What can I do to help?

A: Bullying is surprisingly common among seniors.



Psychology Today defines bullying as “a distinctive pattern of deliberately harming and humiliating others.”


When we think about bullying, school-aged kids and lunch money extortion may come to mind. But bullying can (and does) happen in many environments and social circles and can occur in any age group.

Elder care consultant Frances Parker uses an example from an assisted living setting: "Older adults saving preferred seats in a dining room for their friends ensures that the 'new people' are stuck with the less desirable, leftover seating and feeling isolated."




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(COMPLETE ARTICLE)

How Senior Citizens Can Save Money
On Their Car Insurance Premiums



    “Senior drivers can easily lower their car insurance premiums if they follow several money-saving methods”, said Russell Rabichev, Marketing Director of Internet Marketing Company.


Compare-autoinsurance.org has launched a new blog post that explains how senior citizens can get better car insurance rates.


According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the frequency of crashes increases for drivers that are 70-year-old or more. As a result, insurers place seniors in the high-risk category.

Senior drivers that are looking for better car insurance premiums can follow the next tips:

Look for a low-mileage discount. Insurance companies offer significant discounts for drivers that drive less. Senior citizens that just got retired are no longer required to commute to work, so they usually drive fewer miles.


    Graduate a defensive driving course. Senior citizens will find out how medications and aging affect driving and how to better accommodate these changes. Also, classes are cheap and will provide significant discounts after graduation.

    Install anti-theft devices. Senior citizens can install noisy alarms, ignition kill switches, steering wheel locks, vehicle tracking systems, or other anti-theft devices to prove their insurer they want to keep their vehicle safe. Depending on what safety device is installed, insurance companies will offer various discounts.

    Look for a cheaper car to insure. Senior citizens are recommended to insure slightly used cars that already have several safety features installed.

    Pay for the whole policy at once. Senior citizens can save between 5% to 10% if they pay for the full policy at once. This way senior citizens won't have to pay for monthly interest charges and administration fees.

    Keep a clean driving record. Senior citizens that maintain a clean driving record can qualify for a good driver discount. This way they can lower their insurance premiums even further.

    Check online insurance quotes. By comparing multiple online insurance quotes, senior citizens can decide if to remain with the same insurance provider or switch to another one that provides better insurance rates.

For additional info, money-saving tips, and free car insurance quotes, visit https://compare-autoinsurance.org/

Compare-autoinsurance.org is an online provider of life, home, health, and auto insurance quotes. This website is unique because it does not simply stick to one kind of insurance provider, but brings the clients the best deals from many different online insurance carriers. In this way, clients have access to offers from multiple carriers all in one place: this website. On this site, customers have access to quotes for insurance plans from various agencies, such as local or nationwide agencies, brand names insurance companies, etc.







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Good Day. It’s Monday, November 22, 2021












It’s that time of year…again. Thanksgiving is just a few days away and Christmas and Chanukah is not far behind. For many, this will be the first time in two years people have been able to gather, together, with family and friends, with the possibility of contracting COVID-19 a little less threatening. Hopefully, all the folks that will congregate for turkey day, Christmas and New Year will have been vaccinated. Including the kids. I sincerely hope you all have a great time. But for some, this time of year has little or none of the meaning it once did. For many residents of long-term care facilities, Thanksgiving is just another day.


Not that the facilities don’t try their best to make things festive and bright. Holiday decorations festoon the dining room walls, lobby, and halls. There may even be a holiday party or two and a special Thanksgiving Day dinner. But it’s just not the same. Being with your “resident” friends and being with your real friends and relatives are quite different. The bond, and often the friction, of dinner with the relatives cannot be duplicated no matter how good the turkey is or how much pumpkin pie there is. You can (and will) say things to your relatives you would never say to your A.L.F. acquaintances. For a good reason.
 
If you say something about someone here at the A.L.F., it sticks. You cannot escape those you have slighted. They live here, with you. With your relatives, it’s different. You say what you want and then go home. With any luck, you won’t have to see or speak to those people for another year.

Personally, I miss those confrontations and the comradery available only when you are with people who know you better than you know yourself. And, as much as the conversation may rub you the wrong way or is hurtful or off-color or just plain stupid, you know there is a special connection which cannot be duplicated anywhere but at home. And I would be amiss if I said that many of my friends here at the facility don’t feel the same way. Me among them.

Don’t worry. I’m not looking for an invitation to your Thanksgiving dinner. But I would give anything to sit around a table and gorge myself on tender turkey breast or gnarl on a drumstick not to mention a cold brewski or two and not have to listen to conversation about your surgery or how Social Security is trying to screw you or how your doctor doesn’t understand you. The last thing I need is negativity. Especially on a day we are supposed to give thanks for what we have.

We will have a Thanksgiving dinner here this year. We missed last year’s function because the State kept us locked away rather than subject themselves to more bad press, litigation or worse. And dinner (whatever it is) will be appreciated by those of us who have nowhere else to go. And that’s okay. For me, right now, the hassle associated with travel and mobility is more than I will subject myself to. The only thing I will miss is not being able to look, once again, at the faces I’ve known forever and feel the love that no words or pictures on a Facebook page can convey. Happy Thanksgiving…………………..
 
 


NOVEMBER 22, 2021



The Corporate Plan to Murder Medicare
Runs Through Medicare Advantage



In 2003, George W Bush set up the destruction and privatization of Medicare. The end of "real Medicare" is getting closer every day, and Congress and Medicare's administrators are doing nothing.


Last Friday the Centers for Medicare Services (CMS) announced a 14.5% increase in Medicare Part B premiums, raising the monthly payments by the lowest-income Medicare recipients from $148.50 a month to $170.10 a month next year.

Congress must stop these for-profit parasites who are steadily draining "real" Medicare of funds and resources while producing billions in profits and often outright stolen funds for the insurance industry.



The House Build Back Better Bill Makes
Historic Changes For Older Adults,
But Care Gaps Remain

By Howard Gleckman

The Build Back Better social spending bill the House passed this morning includes a long list of important changes aimed at improving the quality of life of older adults. There is much left to be done, and even this bill may be pared back in the Senate. But following the pandemic catastrophe for older adults, it would be significant progress.


The House’s $1.75 trillion version of Build Back Better bill would expand the federal contribution to Medicaid’s home and community-based care (HCBS) program by 6 percent annually, or about $150 billion over 10 years.


It would require many companies to provide four weeks of paid family leave for those caring for parents, children, spouses, and siblings.




Caregivers relieved
as nursing home restrictions lifted in New York


Nursing homes in the state are lifting COVID-19 visitation restrictions within their facilities effective immediately now that the New York State Department of Health adopted federal guidance requiring the change, according to a nursing home advocacy group and a facility in Washington County.


The new guidance updates rules released in September 2020, which allowed for limited visitations and required mask-wearing.


Under the updated state guidance sent in a letter to nursing homes on Nov. 16, nursing home residents will now be allowed unabridged access to visitors, regardless of their vaccination status. Pre-existing limits on how many people and how long visitations can last have also been lifted.




The New Social Security Statements:
Reasons to Check Yours Out



How Social Security made it easier to see what you could get, depending on when you start claiming

For years, the Social Security Administration has done a pretty crummy job telling Americans how much they'll likely receive in Social Security benefits. But I'm glad to say that the agency just replaced its text-heavy, four-page Social Security Statement with a redesigned, more useful, more visual, two-page version.


As a result, I strongly urge you to visit the Social Security website to see the vital, clear information for your retirement security. To do so, you'll want to either visit your "my Social Security Account" on the site or set one up. Otherwise, you can only see your Statement when it comes in the mail once you turn 60. (Only 63 million Americans have my Social Security Accounts, though 176 million workers pay taxes into the Social Security program.)




How to explain cryptocurrency to senior citizens
By Vivek Kaul

A few days ago, my 66-year-old maternal aunt asked me a very simple question: “Beta (son), what is crypto?" Much before her, my mother had asked the same. This is a question I often get asked these days, especially from the middle-aged and the senior citizens.



Other forms of the same question are: Is crypto really a currency? Can I use it to buy stuff from my neighbourhood kiranawalla? If it’s a currency, why are people buying and selling it?


Honestly, it’s extremely difficult to explain the technical aspects of crypto to a layperson. One is because technical aspects are, well, technical. And two, because the middle-aged and the senior citizens already have a certain visualization of money in their minds, which is very physical.




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How to talk about vaccines with anti-vaxxers,
deniers and belligerent uncles at Thanksgiving

By: Al Tompkins


So many journalists have told me they are dreading family gatherings this Thanksgiving because they know they will hear about the “lying media” and endless false claims about vaccines, anti-virals and conspiracies.


A recent Harris Poll showed that one in 10 Americans is not openly admitting that they are vaccinated and a heck of a lot of vaccinated people are not telling anybody. And the poll found half of the more than 1,400 vaccinated respondents were either “extremely” or “considerably” hesitant to spend the holidays with unvaccinated family members or friends.


The New York Times published a piece called “How to host Thanksgiving with unvaccinated friends, family,” which includes this idea:....






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Good Day. It’s Sunday, November 21, 2021








On Thursday, I completed my 30th and last physical therapy session.
 
After an evaluation by my therapist (comparing my abilities when I began against how I performed today), it was judged that, at least for now, I had gone as far as I could go.
 
What does that mean?
 
I voluntarily entered the program hoping I could recover some of the stamina I lost during those 16 months of inactivity brought about by a forced COVID-19 related lockdown. Taking all of my meals in my room and not taking part in any activities quickly brought about a noticeable change in my ability to walk for more than a few minutes.


The other reason I subjected myself to an often rigorous and exhausting twice-a-week, 45-minute session was to possibly improve my balance. Which is the main reason I still use a cane when I walk. I have to report that I accomplished half of my goal.

While my stamina has improved dramatically, my balance issues remain the same. Most likely they will never improve very much because of an inner-ear problem I have. But despite that, I am encouraged by what improvement I accomplished and will continue to improve. The last thing I want is the need to go back to using a walker or Rolator or worse, a wheelchair.

Having been in a period of intense rehabilitation during a two-year stint in a nursing home a few years ago, I knew the benefits of physical therapy.

P.T. is a slow and methodical process whose results are not immediately apparent. Only after considerable time and work does improvement show.

I was handed a list of exercises I can continue with on my own. They are low-impact, but if I do them three or four times a week, I will continue to improve. My therapist did all she could. Now, it’s up to me………………….
 

NOVEMBER 21, 2021



How Coffee and Tea Can Help Lower
the Risk of Stroke, Dementia
By Tony Hicks


Researchers say people who drink a moderate amount of coffee and tea per day have a lower risk of stroke and dementia.

Experts say this is one of a number of benefits of daily consumption of coffee or tea. They say these beverages contain flavonoids and other ingredients that can boost health. They do caution, however, that too much coffee or tea can disrupt sleep patterns due to caffeine levels as well as produce other health concerns.


Researchers say consuming either or both of those beverages may lower your risk of stroke and dementia.

A study released today by researchers at Tianjin Medical University says healthy individuals between the ages of 50 and 74 who drank two to three cups of coffee or three to five cups of tea per day — or a combination of four to six cups of both per day — had the lowest incidence of stroke and dementia among 365,682 study participants.




Therapy stigma rampant among older adults:
Just 8% of baby boomers willing to see therapist

Three-quarters of Americans believe the COVID pandemic has helped them realize they need to prioritize their health more than they have in the past, according to new research. The survey of 2,000 Americans reveals the global crisis has given them a chance to become healthier and focus on what matters most.


Seventy-four percent of respondents feel their physical health is just as important as their mental and emotional health: becoming healthier is not just tackling one area for most respondents. In all, 82 percent believe a healthy diet is integral to their overall wellness. However, diet isn’t America’s only area of focus. The vast majority (88%) have developed a variety of healthy habits during the past 18 months.

Holistic healing

health mattersConducted by OnePoll on behalf of MegaFood, the survey looked at what matters when it comes to our health and wellness and how our approach to physical, emotional, and mental health may have shifted in the last year and a half.




Nearly half of all Americans expect
to retire in debt, survey finds
By Jessica Dickler

Roughly 46% of all Americans expect to retire in debt, according to a report.  However, debt repayment is even harder on a fixed income and can threaten your retirement security.

What is the best retirement savings account for you?



Most people are used to living with debt. Retiring in the red is another story.

Maintaining enough cash on hand to cover recurring bills with interest is harder on a fixed income and adds another obstacle to the challenge of living comfortably.

And yet, 46% of all Americans expect to retire in debt, according to a survey by personal finance site MagnifyMoney.



How much is taken out of your
Social Security check for Medicare?
By Maite Knorr-Evans

On 12 November, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMM) released the 2022 premium prices and deductibles for Medicare Parts A and B.

Across the board, those on Medicare will pay more for their care. The price of the premium for Medicare Part B, which most members are required to pay, will increase fifteen percent from $148.50 to $171. This increase is almost triple the Social Security Cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) those on social security will see reflected in their benefits next year.



The premium for Medicare Part B is typically deducted from a person's social security check. However, since 2007, the premium paid for Part B is based on a person's total income. With most beneficiaries having an income under $91,000, most pay the standard price.



Health Benefits Of Tai Chi For Seniors
By Kimberly Dawn Neumann

Looking to get fitter without stressing out about it? Learn to go with the flow.

Tai chi, a mind-body exercise rooted in multiple Asian traditions including martial arts, traditional Chinese medicine and philosophy, has become widely recognized as a gentle form of fitness that packs a serious health-promoting punch. With benefits that include better balance, enhanced immunity and improved cognition, it’s also popular with the senior set, thanks to its accessibility and effectiveness.


“We often talk about tai chi as mindfulness on wheels,” says Peter M. Wayne, Ph.D., director of the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, which is jointly based at the Harvard Medical School and Brigham Women’s Hospital, and author of The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi. “It integrates slow, intentional movements with breathing and cognitive skills like imagery,” he says. The result: Enhanced fitness without breaking a sweat.





Here’s how Medicare beneficiaries can appeal
income-related charges that result in higher premiums

By Sarah O'Brien
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/10/heres-how-to-appeal-income-related-charges-for-medicare-premiums.html
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Now is the time for for older adults,
their caregivers: aging services leaders

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/now-is-the-time-for-for-older-adults-their-caregivers-aging-services-leaders/
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Nursing Homes Lose 221,000 Employees During COVID,
 Who's Taking Care of Our Seniors?

Read more  >>  https://www.lifenews.com/2021/11/10/nursing-homes-lose-221000-employees-during-covid-whos-taking-care-of-our-seniors/
============================================================
Assisted Living Facilities Temporarily in a “Doughnut Hole”
regarding Federal Vaccine Mandates

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/assisted-living-facilities-temporarily-6089021/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
=============================================================
Type of fat, not how much, linked to stroke risk
By Kaitlin Sullivan
Read more  >>  https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/type-fat-not-much-linked-stroke-risk-study-finds-rcna4688
=============================================================
US announces big hike in Medicare premiums
By Maggie Fox and Tami Luhby
Read more >>  https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/12/health/medicare-premium-hike/index.html
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Social Security: Rising Cost of Eggs, Milk and Bacon
Render COLA Boost Worthless

By Georgina Tzanetos
Read more  >>  https://www.gobankingrates.com/retirement/social-security/rising-cost-of-eggs-milk-and-bacon-render-cola-social-security-boost-worthless/
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Why the Cost of Long-Term Care
Is Out of Reach for the Middle Class

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/the-cost-of-long-term-care-is-out-of-reach-for-middle-income-earners/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=8337022f46-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_JAHF-NL&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-8337022f46-165407981&mc_cid=8337022f46&mc_eid=94767a79b9
=============================================================
Shingles Doesn’t Care: Re-Engaging
Older Patients to Get Vaccinated

By Alexandra Hanretty, PharmD, Meghan Mitchell, PharmD, BCIDP
Read more  >>  https://www.pharmacytimes.com/view/shingles-doesn-t-care-re-engaging-older-patients-to-get-vaccinated
=============================================================
A Call to Congress:
Strengthen Service Coordination for Older Adults

Read more  >>  https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-11-15/section-202-service-coordinators-can-benefit-older-adults
=============================================================
An Anti-Inflammatory Diet High in Veggies
May Decrease Your Dementia Risk

By Julia Ries
Read more  >>  https://www.healthline.com/health-news/an-anti-inflammatory-diet-high-in-veggies-may-decrease-your-dementia-risk
==============================================================
Nursing homes can now lift most COVID restrictions on visits
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Read more  >>  https://kpic.com/news/coronavirus/nursing-homes-can-now-lift-most-covid-restrictions-on-visits
==============================================================
Support of friends, relatives can help
 older adults avoid nursing homes

By Brian P. Dunleavy
Read more  >>  https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/11/15/seniors-support-nursing-home-study/9151636992181/
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Older U.S. workers are ‘unretiring’
By Elisabeth Buchwald
Read more  >>  https://www.marketwatch.com/story/older-u-s-workers-are-unretiring-11637008509
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6 Top Tips for Financial Success in Retirement
Read more >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/6-top-tips-for-financial-success-in-retirement/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=29f54513e9-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_16_21__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-29f54513e9-165407981&mc_cid=29f54513e9&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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Hearing aid coverage could be 'transformational'
By Marlene Cimons
Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-11-aid-coverage.html
==============================================================
Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month
shines spotlight other dementias

Read more  >>  https://www.endalznow.org/news/alzheimers-disease-awareness-month-shines-spotlight-other-dementias?j=2515040&e=thebeecee@hotmail.com&l=27527_HTML&u=82492818&mid=518002849&jb=10004
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Why and how seniors should learn to use technology
Read more  >>  https://azbigmedia.com/business/why-and-how-seniors-should-learn-to-use-technology/




Where Did All the Public Bathrooms Go?
By Elizabeth Yuko


For decades, U.S. cities have been closing or neglecting public restrooms, leaving millions with no place to go. Here’s how a lack of toilets became an American affliction.




Surviving a pandemic has a way of forcing people to focus on the basics: health, food, shelter, the need for human connection — and going to the bathroom.


This became evident during the Great Toilet Paper Shortage of 2020, when panic buyers emptied store shelves in the first weeks of U.S. stay-home orders. As Covid closures continued, the pandemic revealed a different toilet-related problem that predated the novel coronavirus: a dire lack of public restrooms. Though facilities in bars and retail establishments are often thought of as “public,” widespread shutdowns served as a stark reminder that they’re really not — and that few genuinely public bathrooms remain in American cities.










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Good Day. It’s Thursday, November 18, 2021




NOVEMBER 18, 2021



Older U.S. workers are ‘unretiring’
By Elisabeth Buchwald

More than 3 million Americans retired earlier than they anticipated during the pandemic — but now some are trickling back into the labor force.

Some older workers are making a U-turn back into the workforce.



Fueled in part by record stock market growth, an uptick in savings rates and fear of getting COVID-19 on the job, some 3 million Americans who were nearing retirement before the pandemic chose to leave the workforce earlier than they anticipated during the pandemic.

But as vaccination rates continue to rise and many employers are raising wages to lure workers amidst one of the tightest labor markets in decades, some retirees are “unretiring,” said Nick Bunker, director of economic research at Indeed Hiring Lab.




6 Top Tips for Financial Success in Retirement

Retirement can be an exciting time. Perhaps you've taken up a hobby, moved to a smaller home closer to your children or finally have time to volunteer for an organization you're passionate about.  


Retirement can also be a scary time, filled with lots of unknowns, especially when it comes to making financial decisions.  

For starters, money is only one piece of the retirement puzzle. Older Americans should also prioritize their physical and mental health, finding purpose and relationships with family and friends, says Elisabeth Larson, a financial adviser at Edward Jones in Amherst, N.H.




Hearing aid coverage could be 'transformational'
By Marlene Cimons

About half of all Americans older than 60 and two-thirds older than 70 have some degree of hearing loss, according to Johns Hopkins University researchers. Many older people cannot afford the prohibitive price of hearing aids, which can cost thousands of dollars, or are reluctant even to admit they have a hearing problem.


Medicare has never covered the cost of hearing aids—an omission that has long presented a barrier to older people who would gain from access to these life-altering devices. But that could soon change. The $1.75 trillion social spending bill currently under consideration by Congress provides a Medicare hearing benefit for the first time in the history of the 56-year-old health insurance program for those 65 and older. This proposed expansion follows the Food and Drug Administration's recent release of new regulations allowing the sale of over-the-counter hearing aids. Together, these two major policy changes would be the biggest advances to hearing care in decades.


To understand the implications for older Americans with hearing loss, the Hub spoke with Nicholas Reed, a clinical audiologist and assistant professor in the department of epidemiology and core faculty at the Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.



Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month
shines spotlight other dementias

In November, we recognize Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, an opportunity to shine a light on a debilitating disease that causes memory and thinking problems often referred to as dementia. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases according to the Alzheimer’s Association.  But what else can cause dementia?



The Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry invited David Weidman, MD, a neurologist and associate medical director for research at the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix to explain some additional types of dementia.


“Dementia is a broad category of disorders with accelerated brain decline,” said Dr. Weidman. “While Alzheimer’s is the biggest piece of the pie, there are other reasons for dementia including vascular changes in the brain, Parkinson’s or Lewy Body Dementias and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD).”



Why and how seniors should learn to use technology

Instead of tuning out when confronted with a smartphone or social media account, senior citizens can learn a few basics to take away the fear and confusion. Whether you need to learn how to turn the computer on and off, or just need to make sense of a few things, there’s a learning path for you.

Why Bother Learning Technology?



There’s no going back to the pre-technology days, and seniors need to get with the program or prepare to be left behind. If you don’t learn some technology, you will have an increasingly hard time doing basic things like making a phone call or paying a bill. And you will miss out on the speed, efficiency, and other attractive capabilities of these new methods.







4 YouTube Channels Seniors Should Check Out


Some seniors take on new professions and interests after retirement. These seniors have taken the unconventional step of creating YouTube channels and uploading their videos, which have turned them into social media stars. Flower Mound elderly care professionals discuss 4 popular YouTube channels run by seniors.

1. The Angry Grandpa

This show is run by Charles Green Jr., a grandpa who is angry at just about everything. You can watch this senior rant about celebrity news, political happenings, sports, and more. Charles has over 100,000,000 views on YouTube, where over


3,000,000 subscribers log on to hear his foul language and one-of-a-kind attitude. Green’s fan base refer to themselves as “Grandpa’s Army.” He feels the show is a great way to bond with his son while staying healthy and busy.

 
2.Grandma Mary


The 85-year-old viral star who runs this YouTube channel wanted to be famous before she died, and she is currently doing just that. Mary Bartnicki became a viral sensation with her two sisters. The trio had their own show, Golden Sisters, on the Oprah Winfrey Network. The show has since been canceled, but Bartnicki continues to create videos mocking song lyrics, giving advice, critiquing the latest fashions, and telling stories that make her audience laugh and tune in.









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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, November 17, 2021









Joe Biden’s approval rating is not good. Especially for so early in his term. Right now it’s hovering around 42%. That’s approximately the same as the biggest POS ever to hold the office of president, Donald Trump. How can that be? Surely people can see the difference between the two. On personality and compassion alone, Biden should be way ahead of the Orange Menace. Unfortunately, where presidential politics are concerned, it doesn’t work that way. It’s all about “You’re at the helm now and it’s your fault if the ship’s sinking.” Voter’s memories are short. They forget much of what the former guy did to get us where we are and put the blame on the man in office. But not me. We are where we are almost entirely because of Donald Trump and his mob of Republican henchmen whose view of the nation’s future does not extend past 1952.


Where’s my proof? Look around you. Do you see all of those people wearing masks? After almost two years into this pandemic, we are as much involved in COVID-19 as we were from the start. And it should not be this way. If the former administration had (1) been straight with us and had acknowledged the fact we were in trouble earlier, we could have been better prepared. And (2), the indifference shown by Trump and the people surrounding him to taking even the most basic precautions against the virus was not as blatant an act of incompetence as I have seen. And finally, even after a proven vaccine (one that Trump himself “fast-tracked”) he still refused to urge Americans to listen to the science and get vaccinated. And because of that, we are still suffering the effects of the virus, both physically and economically.
 


This is what Biden inherited, That, along with a Republican party too chicken-s**t to think for themselves and do the right thing. Instead they hang on to the coattails of a self-centered megalomaniac hoping to get a taste of some of those 170 million votes Trump ammassed in the 2020 election.
 
And let us not forget the dissident segment in the Democratic party. Senator Manchin and Senator Sinema, whose opposition to the President’s “Build Back America” bill is absurd.
 
Biden was elected partially because of his ability to work with both sides of the aisle. And, in “normal” times, we would have seen some of that. But because of that one polarizing factor (Donald Trump) any hope for continued bi-partisan support for anything has been dashed along with the hopes of millions of Americans of ever getting their piece of the pie.
 
Biden is not without fault. And his fault is he has failed to recognize that the Washington (and the nation) he knew is no more. It’s time for him to be a lot less “kinder and gentler” and start kicking some congressional ass……………………….
 
 

NOVEMBER 17, 2021



A Call to Congress:
Strengthen Service Coordination for Older Adults


Eileen spends most of her Monday in a dialysis center chatting with nurses about her life in Indianapolis decades ago. She says in the 90s, this area was an idyllic neighborhood, with kids playing kick-the-can until the streetlights came on. Money was tight in this section of town then as it is now, but Eileen and her husband were young and had their health.



Now, as her blood filters through the dialysis machine, Eileen – a fictional but composite character based on others I have known – looks tired. She would not be in end-stage renal disease if her diabetes had been caught sooner and managed. Unfortunately, it is common for impoverished older adults to discover they have diabetes only after receiving a diagnosis of kidney failure.


Having service coordinators for residents of Section 202 housing – affordable housing for low-income older adults – could help tremendously. During COVID-19, the federal CARES Act provided grants to support these kinds of coordinators. They were essential in assisting residents and reducing the impact of COVID-19 among an older, frail population. Yet stability in funding service coordinator positions will be essential for the burgeoning older adult population. It can help boost housing security and improve health among these seniors, as well as reduce Medicare and Medicaid spending.




An Anti-Inflammatory Diet High in Veggies
May Decrease Your Dementia Risk

By Julia Ries

A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and beans may be linked to a lower risk of developing dementia, according to a new study out of Greece.

People who ate an anti-inflammatory diet were less likely to develop dementia during the study time period.

Less inflammation in the body may aid the brain and help lower dementia risk over time.


A new study from the American Academy of Neurology found that people who follow an anti-inflammatory diet — which is rich in fruits, vegetables, beans along with tea or coffee — have a lower risk of developing dementia later on.

These foods are great sources of beneficial vitamins and minerals, which can protect our cells from damage and prevent inflammation in the body.




Nursing homes can now lift most
COVID restrictions on visits
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

The government on Friday directed nursing homes to open their doors wide to visitors, easing many remaining pandemic restrictions while urging residents, families and facility staff to keep their guard up against outbreaks.


The new guidance from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services instructs nursing homes to allow visits at all times for all residents. Facilities will no longer be able to limit the frequency and length of visits, or require advance scheduling. Although large groups of visitors are discouraged, nursing homes won't be allowed to limit the number of loved ones and friends who can pay a call on residents.

Many states and communities are still grappling with COVID-19 surges driven by the aggressive delta variant, but the most recent government data show that cases among residents and staff have continued to decline after rising earlier in the summer and fall.



Support of friends, relatives can help
older adults avoid nursing homes

By Brian P. Dunleavy

Older adults with relatives or friends, other than their spouses or partners, able to assist them with daily tasks and activities are less likely to spend significant time in a nursing home, a study published Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine found.


People age 65 years and older who lived alone and independently and had access to "identifiable social support" from relatives or friends were nearly 30% less likely to have a prolonged nursing home stay within the next two years than those without such support, the data showed.

Even those who experienced a "health shock," such as a heart attack or stroke, had about a 20% lower risk for a prolonged nursing home stay if they had available support from friends or family, the researchers said.





How Senior Citizens Can Save Money
On Their Car Insurance Premiums


“Senior drivers can easily lower their car insurance premiums if they follow several money-saving methods”, said Russell Rabichev, Marketing Director of Internet Marketing Company.


Compare-autoinsurance.org has launched a new blog post that explains how senior citizens can get better car insurance rates.


According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the frequency of crashes increases for drivers that are 70-year-old or more. As a result, insurers place seniors in the high-risk category.


Senior drivers that are looking for better car insurance premiums can follow the next tips:

    Look for a low-mileage discount. Insurance companies offer significant discounts for drivers that drive less. Senior citizens that just got retired are no longer required to commute to work, so they usually drive fewer miles.

    Graduate a defensive driving course. Senior citizens will find out how medications and aging affect driving and how to better accommodate these changes. Also, classes are cheap and will provide significant discounts after graduation.

    Install anti-theft devices. Senior citizens can install noisy alarms, ignition kill switches, steering wheel locks, vehicle tracking systems, or other anti-theft devices to prove their insurer they want to keep their vehicle safe. Depending on what safety device is installed, insurance companies will offer various discounts.

    Look for a cheaper car to insure. Senior citizens are recommended to insure slightly used cars that already have several safety features installed.

    Pay for the whole policy at once. Senior citizens can save between 5% to 10% if they pay for the full policy at once. This way senior citizens won't have to pay for monthly interest charges and administration fees.

    Keep a clean driving record. Senior citizens that maintain a clean driving record can qualify for a good driver discount. This way they can lower their insurance premiums even further.

Check online insurance quotes. By comparing multiple online insurance quotes, senior citizens can decide if to remain with the same insurance provider or switch to another one that provides better insurance rates.


For additional info, money-saving tips, and free car insurance quotes, visit https://compare-autoinsurance.org/

Compare-autoinsurance.org is an online provider of life, home, health, and auto insurance quotes. This website is unique because it does not simply stick to one kind of insurance provider, but brings the clients the best deals from many different online insurance carriers. In this way, clients have access to offers from multiple carriers all in one place: this website. On this site, customers have access to quotes for insurance plans from various agencies, such as local or nationwide agencies, brand names insurance companies, etc.








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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, November 16, 2021





NOVEMBER 16, 2021
Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com




Medicare's open enrollment is
open season for scammers


Finding the best private Medicare drug or medical insurance plan among dozens of choices is tough enough without throwing misleading sales tactics into the mix.



Yet federal officials say complaints are rising from seniors tricked into buying policies — without their consent or lured by questionable information — that may not cover their drugs or include their doctors. In response, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has threatened to penalize private insurance companies selling Medicare Advantage and drug plans if they or agents working on their behalf mislead consumers.

The agency has also revised rules making it easier for beneficiaries to escape plans they didn't sign up for or enrolled in only to discover promised benefits didn't exist or they couldn't see their providers.




Researchers are searching for inexpensive ways
to preserve memory.
Multivitamins may be an answer.

By Kaitlin Sullivan

Early findings from a clinical trial suggest that taking a daily multivitamin may delay cognitive decline in older adults.



The results, presented Wednesday at the Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s Disease conference in Boston, are currently under review and have not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal. A number of questions remain as to how big of a role supplementation may play, but Laura Baker, a professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, who led the trial, said if further research confirms the findings, multivitamins could fill a gap in preventive care.

“I am always looking for something that is inexpensive and accessible to everyone, especially to communities that don’t have access to expensive interventions,” Baker said. “It’s already such a widely used supplement, and we need to know if it might have any benefits for cognitive function.”



Study finds that sitting more is linked to increased
feelings of depression, anxiety

The study found people who continued to spend a higher amount of time sitting between April and June 2020 were likely to have higher symptoms of depression.


As people adhered to stay-at-home orders or self-isolated during the early months of the COVID-19 outbreak, daily commutes turned into shuffles between the bedroom and the living room. Clicking Zoom links erased time spent walking to meeting rooms, and Netflix spilled into time otherwise dedicated to the gym.

In short, a lot of people suddenly became more sedentary during the onset of the pandemic. Recently published research found people who continued to spend a higher amount of time sitting between April and June 2020 were likely to have higher symptoms of depression. A closer investigation into this association could play a role in helping people improve their mental health.




Guide to Providing In-Home Care
for a Loved One


Nearly 9 in 10 U.S. adults want to stay in their home or that of a loved one as they age, according to a May 2021 study by the Associated Press and the University of Chicago's NORC research center.


Family caregiving is a key component to making that wish a reality. The 2020 Caregiving in the U.S. report from AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving found that 43 percent of family caregivers are looking after people who live in their own home, and 40 percent share a residence with the care recipient.

Helping a loved one age in place may mean anything from stopping by a parent's home to check in every few days to assisting a spouse or partner with tasks such as bathing and meal prep, as well as activities including medication management and administering injections. Whatever level of care you provide, these tips can help you help your loved one remain at home for as long, and as comfortably, as possible.








Your Cat May Know Where You Are
Even When They Can't See You
By Corryn Wetzel


New research suggests your cat is likely using sounds to keep track of where you are, even when you’re out of sight. Domestic cats create “mental maps” that track where their owner is located based on the direction of certain sounds, an ability that was previously unknown in felines, according to new research published this week in the journal PLOS One.



Study author Saho Takagi, a doctoral student at Kyoto University, says she has long been interested in cats' hearing and their ability to move their ears in different directions.


"I saw a cat with only one of its ears tilted back, listening to the sound behind it, and felt that cats must be thinking about many things from the sound," Takagi says in an email to CNN’s Sherry Liang. "This time, I investigated whether they map their owner's position spatially from sounds."









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     As we grow older we are less likely to welcome new tastes. Nutritionists say this phenomenon is due to programming - when we get used to eating certain types of foods when we're young and our brain are programmed to accept these flavors. Sadly, with age, the brain's ability to be trained is less efficient.

     As we continue to age, our desire to eat is reduced. There are several reasons for this, including the shrinkage of the stomach. The brain simply tells older people that they're full faster. There's even a change in a mechanism in the btrain telling us when we need to eat or drink.

     Combine this with reduced saliva flow, dentures and a weaker sense of taste and it's easy to see why eating takes a back seat in old age.

source Google. Food preferences for seniors



Food. More Than Just Nourishment

If you think of food as only a way to re-fuel the body or a way to avoid starving , this may not be the blog post for you. While it’s true, we need food to live, eating is, for most people, a way of adding some pleasure to your life. Or, at least, it should be. And, for many seniors, mealtimes become a way of socializing, gossip and learning as much as a time to do your body some good. And just because we are a little advanced in years should not mean we can no longer appreciate good food. And conversely, know when food is crap too.
 
In my 7 plus years as a resident here at the A.L.F. I have been subjected to some terrible food, some mediocre food and, on rare occasions, some decent food. Unfortunately, not all the meals served here are made with our health in mind. Carbs overshadow proteins and little effort is made to make the food look, or taste, appetizing. At best, it’s subsistent level food made to satisfy a budget as much as the nutritional needs of seniors.
 
Therefore, while this post is not meant for those of us who must take our meals in an institutional setting, there is much information for the rest of you who are fortunate enough to buy, prepare and choose your own meals.
 
As a matter of complete disclosure, I must tell you I have not tested or tasted much of what you will read here. But the articles are written by experts and the information should be viewed with that in mind. Bon appétit……..
 
 

SOME TYPICAL INSTITUTIONAL MEALS FOR SENIORS




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The 7 Most Addictive Foods
And How To Stop Eating Them
By Alexandra Cerone, Samantha Curra

I’m a salad-loving vegetarian, but I have a dirty little secret: I’m also a devoted junk food junkie. As healthy as I try to keep my diet, I still fall prey to bad eating habits. For instance, when I’m binge-watching my favorite shows, you’ll probably find me binge-eating my favorite unhealthy snacks: Ruffles Sour Cream & Onion Potato Chips or chocolate Häagen-Dazs ice cream. No matter how sweet and colorful the assortment of fruit on my counter, it doesn’t stand a chance against chips and ice cream.


If you’re a devoted junk food eater like me, of if you’re … I don’t know… HUMAN, you know how hard it is to fight the urge to overindulge. Have you ever wondered why that is? According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, some ultra-processed foods can be just as addictive as alcohol and cigarettes. The worst offenders are pizza, chocolate, potato chips, cookies, ice cream, french fries, and cheeseburgers.


It’s no accident that these foods taste so good: They’ve been engineered with “industrial formulations” that combine large amounts of sugar, salt, oils, fats, and other additives—ingredients that offer such a rush of pleasure from the very first bite that your body screams for more.


***

5 Foods to Say No to After 50
By Alison Gwinn


We're not going to lie. Eating healthily after 50 means effort on two fronts: boosting your intake of good-for-you foods such as berries, leafy greens, whole grains and lean proteins while cutting out the foods that clog your arteries and oh-so-easily expand your waistline.



When it comes to the latter, focus less on making certain foods verboten (who doesn't suddenly want chocolate when told never to eat it?) and more on how your health is more important than the sugar spike or instant satiety they offer. When possible, just say no — or at least “Whoa!” — to the following.
Skip it: Fried foods that triple the calories


If it helps, pause to imagine the vat of oil that basket of fries or onion rings has been submerged in, and consider how its saturated fat “may have a negative impact on blood cholesterol,” says Amy Gorin, a registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats in Stamford, Connecticut. Not sure how to cut back? Here are three expert tips:


***

Just 200 Fewer Calories Per Day Brings
 Big Health Rewards for Obese Seniors

By Cara Murez


New research shows that cutting just 200 calories a day and exercising moderately could lead to not only weight loss but improved vascular health in older obese adults.

These lifestyle changes may help offset age-related increases in aortic stiffness, which is a measure of vascular health and impacts heart disease.


"This is the first study to assess the effects of aerobic exercise training with and without reducing calories on aortic stiffness, which was measured via cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging [CMR] to obtain detailed images of the aorta," said study author Tina Brinkley, an associate professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at the Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Prevention at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.





***

Your Metabolism Changes As You Age,
 Just Not When You Think

By Dennis Thompson

Everyone knows that your metabolism peaks in your teenage years, when you're fit and active and feeling your oats.


And everyone knows that a person's metabolism slows down in middle age, as bodies start to expand and sag, and become less energetic.


But that's all wrong, it now appears — fake news about how humans age that's gained the currency of truth over the year






***

Healthy dietary intake associated with lower brain iron,
better cognition in older adults



Healthy dietary intake associated with lower brain iron, better cognition in older adults
UK researchers conduct an MRI scan as part of the study, which suggests that a healthy diet is linked to lower brain iron and better cognition in older adults. Credit: University of Kentucky



Research conducted at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine suggests that higher intake of specific nutrients is associated with lower brain iron concentration and better cognitive performance in older adults.


The study was recently published in the Neurobiology of Aging and highlights the important balance of non-heme iron for optimal neuronal function. Excess non-heme brain iron has been associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. High levels of brain iron can also be seen in normal aging, where they have been correlated with poor cognitive performance.



***

5 Superfoods That Reduce
Inflammation from Arthritis
By Barbara Brody


If your hips, knees or hands have gotten stiffer and more painful in recent years, you might be among the more than 32 million Americans who suffer from osteoarthritis (OA). This degenerative joint condition, often described as the “wear and tear” form of arthritis, causes the cartilage that normally cushions joints to break down, allowing bone to rub against bone. The result: pain, redness, stiffness and inflammation.


This kind of arthritis is mainly treated by pain-relieving medications, but lifestyle changes can also help a lot. Exercise and weight loss tend to be top of the list. Regularly moving the impacted joint helps stretch and strengthen the muscles surrounding it, which can ease stiffness and promote mobility. If you're overweight, shedding a few pounds will help take some strain off a weight-bearing joint (like your knee or hip), as well as reduce the amount of inflammatory proteins that are naturally produced by fat cells.


Dietary changes are, of course, the key to losing weight, but tweaking your eating habits can also help control arthritis symptoms. That's because while osteoarthritis is primarily caused by overstressing one or more joints, “there's also a component that has to do with the body's response to injury, which is inflammation,” says Melissa Ann Prest, a registered dietician and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She points to the Mediterranean and DASH diets, which limit added sugar, refined carbohydrates and saturated fat, as anti-inflammatory standouts.


***

Five Surprising Ways Coffee Can Boost Your Health
By Kimberly Goad


Caffeine lovers looking for a healthy way to get their daily fix have long been led to believe that tea offers greater health and wellness benefits. Not anymore. Nutrition experts and medical researchers are finding all kinds of reasons to recommend indulging in that cup of joe, most of them rooted in the fact that coffee is the single greatest contributor to total antioxidant intake.



“Coffee is abundant in bioactive compounds that promote health,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. As she explains, research published in The New England Journal of Medicine shows that these compounds may improve the gut microbiome (made up of healthy bacteria that aid in digestion and boost immunity) and reduce what's called oxidative stress, which occurs when free radicals outnumber antioxidants in a way that leads to disease-causing cellular damage in the body. “The beans also have a deep rich hue, and we know that the deeper the color of a plant, the more benefits we can expect for health.” Those benefits, research shows, translate into everything from lowering your risk of diabetes to potentially boosting your brain health.


Moderation, of course, is key. According to current dietary guidelines, three to five 8-ounce cups of coffee — or up to 400 mg of caffeine — per day can be part of a healthy diet. But that’s true only for plain black coffee, not cappuccinos, lattes and macchiatos, which are typically high in calories, sugar and fat. And keep in mind that “some medications or health conditions may limit your tolerance to caffeine or its safety profile, so discuss this with your health care provider,” says Jill Weisenberger, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition.


***

Is Fruit Bad for You? What the Science Says
By Thomas Wrona

Most people enjoy eating fruit,  it’s a near-universal health recommendation, and even some centenarians attribute their longevity to it–but can fruit be bad for you?

The short answer is, it depends…


Fruit, unlike vegetables, is the only part of the plant that is meant to be eaten by humans and other animals. That’s why it’s sweet, hanging there for us to pick, and a natural laxative. Since plants don’t have feet or wings, they count on creatures like us to eat their fruit, carry the seeds away, and spread them far and wide.


For most people not on a keto diet, moderate consumption of low sugar fruits is probably fine. But not all fruits are equal, and for groups of people with insulin resistance and carbohydrate sensitivity, fruit does have its downsides.


***


Why do elderly people suffer
from loss of appetite?
By Dr B Padmakumar


Lack of appetite is a major problem faced by elderly people and the condition is more prevalent among men than women.

Fewer calories needed


The elderly suffer from appetite loss owing to several reasons. One among them is the change that the body undergoes as one ages. Elderly people may not require as many calories as youngsters as they rarely engage in tasks that need physical exertion like the latter. As a result, the metabolic mechanism of senior citizens gradually slows down.

Taste buds

Another cause for appetite loss is a fall in the number of taste buds on the tongue as a person advances in age. When there are fewer taste buds, the ability to enjoy good taste comes down and could lead to a lack of appetite.


***

7 Superfoods That Help You Get a Better Night's Sleep
By Nicole Pajer


You avoid blue light before bed, have a comfortable mattress and shades to keep your room dark. But did you know that what you eat ­— and when you eat it ­­— can also play a role in how well you sleep?


That’s because while your sleep-wake cycle is controlled by your body’s master clock, located in the hypothalamus of the brain, you also have peripheral clocks in organs like the liver and pancreas. These control physiological processes like managing your blood sugar, cholesterol, hormone secretion and digestion. “If you eat at a time that's contradictory to your circadian system, it throws off the peripheral clocks,” explains Josna Adusumilli, M.D., a neurologist and sleep medicine physician at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. Such misalignment of metabolic processes can impact your would-be slumber.


Ideally, experts say, you should eat a balanced dinner (one that includes protein, carbs and fiber), finishing at least two hours before bedtime, as eating cues your body that it’s time to be awake. “The human body was not meant to digest food lying down,” says Michael Breus, a clinical psychologist and fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.


***

Don’t Qualify for SNAP?
The Commodity Supplemental Food Program
Could Help Seniors

By Georgina Tzanetos


The American Rescue Plan provided an additional $37 million to boost a program for elderly citizens who might need extra help with groceries and food each month.



The Commodity Supplemental Food Program provides low-income elderly individuals with supplemental nutritious food from the U.S. Department of Agriculture each month. The monthly packages of food do not include whole meals and meal packages but rather supply supplemental food products that are “good sources of the nutrients typically lacking in the diets of the beneficiary population.”


The CSFP program supplies a variety of food, like grains, oatmeal, corn grits, beans, peanut butter, canned chicken, beef and tuna and canned low-sodium vegetables like corn and peas.


***

Extra dairy intake lowers risk of falls and
 fractures among older adults in residential care

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Increasing intake of foods rich in calcium and protein such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, reduces falls and fractures in older adults living in residential care, finds a randomized controlled trial published by The BMJ today.


This is one of only a few studies to examine whether getting these nutrients from foods (as opposed to supplements) are effective and safe, and the researchers say this approach has "widespread implications as a public health measure for fracture prevention."


Older adults living in residential care often have low calcium and protein intakes, which can lead to weak bones and an increase in the risk of falls and fractures. It is estimated that older adults in aged care are the source of about 30% of all hip fractures.



***

Polyphenol-rich diet improves the
 intestinal permeability in older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

The increase of intestinal permeability is associated with factors such as aging, food allergies and intolerances and unhealthy diets. This alteration causes a reduction of the gut integrity barrier that triggers the transit of potentially-toxic substances for the blood, and is related to the development of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and even Alzheimer's.



A polyphenol-rich diet improves the intestinal permeability in old people, according to an article published in the journal Clinical Nutrition. The study is led by Cristina Andrés-Lacueva, professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and head of the Research Group of Biomarkers and Nutritional Metabolomics of Food of the University of Barcelona and the Biomedical Research Center of Fragility and Healthy Ageing (CIBERFES), also part of the Catalan Food Innovation Network (XIA).


This European study, conducted within the framework of the Joint Programming Initiative - A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (JPI HDHL), was carried out in people aged over sixty who underwent a polyphenol-rich diet for eight weeks. The results show that including up to three daily portions of apple, cocoa, dark chocolate, green tea, cranberries, oranges or pomegranate juice, improves intestinal permeability when making specific changes in the intestinal microbiota.


***

Are Salt Substitutes Really Good for Your Health?

The human body needs a certain amount of salt — or rather, the sodium in salt — to maintain bodily functions such as adequate fluid levels, muscle function and proper pH in our blood. Yet for some, consuming salt can cause high blood pressure, especially as we age, putting us at risk for hypertension and heart disease.



We know that reducing sodium intake is good for overall health and now a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine proves that.



The study found that by reducing salt (sodium) in the diet and replacing it with salt substitutes containing reduced sodium and increased potassium can lower blood pressure. The rates of stroke and major cardiovascular events in participants were also lower with the salt substitute than with regular salt. The study took place over a five-year period in China — a place known for high salt use —  and focused on people 60 and older with high blood pressure.




Americans Love Sodium

"High blood pressure is a well-known cause of developing heart disease and strokes, says Dr. Nachiket Patel, clinical professor of medicine at University of Arizona Medical School in Phoenix and an interventional cardiologist. "Consuming a lot of salt causes water retention and that causes high blood pressure and it can also decrease the beneficial effects of drugs that lower blood pressure."


***

Older Adults Who Are Vegan
 Need 58 Percent Less Medication

By Nicole Axworthy

A vegan diet is linked to a fewer number of medications prescribed to older adults, according to a new study published in the medical journal American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. The study’s researchers investigated the link between diet and polypharmacy, where a person takes five or more prescribed medications.



Polypharmacy comes with a prevalent health issue among seniors: potential adverse side effects of interactions when taking numerous medications. The researchers point to data showing that individuals who take more than five medications a day carry an 88 percent higher risk of adverse drug events as well as higher mortality rates. They hypothesized that a plant-based diet and healthy lifestyle choices decrease the number of medications needed and therefore reduce the risk of prescription side effects.VegNews.HealthMedication


For the study, data from 328 participants who were 60 years or older was collected through questionnaires and measurements at Loma Linda University Drayson Center in Loma Linda, CA, between 2015 and 2016. Results suggest that a plant-based diet reduces the number of medications seniors were taking by 58 percent compared to meat eaters, even after adjusting for covariates. Vegetarian participants also consumed fewer medications than meat eaters. The study found that an increase in age, body mass index, and presence of disease suggest an increased number of medications taken; however, a plant-based diet showed the lowest amount of medications throughout the sample. Body mass index also had a significant positive association with the number of medications.



FDA recommends restaurants,
 food manufacturers cut back on use of salt
By Kelly McCarthy, Sasha Pezenik


The new guidance hopes to reduce overall sodium intake by 12%.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released sweeping new guidance for the food industry to voluntarily reduce sodium in processed, packaged and prepared foods in an attempt to reduce Americans' consumption.



"The FDA is issuing a final guidance, 'Voluntary Sodium Reduction Goals: Target Mean and Upper Bound Concentrations for Sodium in Commercially Processed, Packaged, and Prepared Foods,' which provides voluntary short-term sodium reduction targets for food manufacturers, chain restaurants and foodservice operators for 163 categories of processed, packaged and prepared foods," the agency announced.


Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock lauded the new sodium reduction guidance in a press conference Wednesday morning. She said it is a "critical step" in improving Americans' nutrition, reducing the burden of diet-related chronic diseases and advancing health equity, predicting the effort would "become one of the most significant public health nutrition interventions in a generation."






RECIPES AND WEBSITES YOU MUST SEE….AND USE



Cook what's in your fridge. One of my favorite food apps. Empty refrigerator? No problem. Just check off what items you do have on hand and the apps will find a sway to make it into a meal.

 GOOD BREAKFAST MADE EASY
https://www.care.com/c/quick-easy-healthy-meals-for-seniors

This website has real breakfast, lunch and dinner suggestions plus tips on how to make cooking easier.

EASY TO FOLLOW RECIPES
https://seniorhomecarecalgary.com/21-quick-easy-meals-for-seniors-2/

From our friends in Canada this website features real food that you can make with easy-to-follow step by step instructions.

EGGS AND OTHER GREAT BREAKFASTS
https://www.australianeggs.org.au/nutrition/meal-plans/weight-gain-for-elderly-meal-plan

Weight Gain For The Elderly 7 Day Meal Plan. A week’s worth of meals for healthy, but underweight seniors. Lots of good egg dishes are featured.


LIKE MEAT?
https://www.hormel.com/Recipes.aspx?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lWNFEgl4zDQHrcmAWndSb1tQxl3OQ9V2Di-3K3NTSUd5v1zHnAyBWBoCBysQAvD_BwE

Life is not all veggies, bland meals and meals fit only for a rabbit. For seniors who like to eat meat the people at Hormel have designed this great site with hundreds of recipes (with pictures) for every meal or occasion.


SIMPLE AND INTERESTING
https://www.pinterest.com/homeinsteadinc/senior-friendly-recipes/

Are you all-thumbs in the kitchen? Do you barely know how to boil water? Pinterest has assembled some really simple non-boring things to make for even the most clueless senior.

-[]-

Seniors are like real people. We have other things to do besides playing Bingo and doctor’s visits.  Therefore, we can’t always be home for all three meals. If that’s you here are a few websites specifically centered on one meal a day.

WHAT'S FOR BREAKFAST?

HEALTHY BREAKFAST ALTERNATIVES

I won’t lie. This is not my kind of food. But it is for many people who want (or must) eat healthier breakfasts.


REAL FOOD WITH AN ENPHASIS ON PROTEIN
https://www.prevention.com/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/g23709836/high-protein-breakfasts/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=arb_ga_pre_d_bm_g23709836&gclid=Cj0KCQiA4b2MBhD2ARIsAIrcB-TCOk_kRQrH6-3m6LYrXodhZ3whsas3TP-1hEVLrxW6uozZWcDfLYwaAmj0EALw_wcB

More my style. Some REAL breakfasts with Real food. Fo those of us who have a craving for more protein, and still stay healthy.


WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?

QUICK LUNCH OPTIONS
https://companionsforseniors.com/2020/10/quick-healthy-lunch-ideas-for-seniors/

Breakfast and dinner may get all the glory, but lunch is an incredibly important meal in its own right. With that being said, it can also be difficult to squeeze in time to eat lunch, which makes it essential to have quick and nutritious options ready to go in your back pocket. Here are five filling and nutritious lunch ideas for the elderly that are also quick, easy, and affordable.


DAIRY FOR LUNCH?
https://www.usdairy.com/recipes/lunch-ideas?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lS17ZRb3NacZWIdk9xtPre54u-z6Iph-KXwByjSpWsSkgyUJrz1vmhoCyHEQAvD_BwE

Featuring some not-so-usual dairy lunches


MUFFINS AND BAGELS
https://thomasbreads.com/recipes/lunch?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lTyTdiw1-cP0kN-9PETtm-q4NvZiDhuCJ71Qb_u41DedT1hpFMj7qBoC86MQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Do you love bagels or English muffins instead of boring old bread? The folks at Thomas’s designed some over-the-top bagel/muffin recipes for a super lunch.



WHAT'S FOR DINNER?

FOODS THAT HEAL
https://www.elderoptionsoftexas.com/nutritional-dinner-ideas-for-the-elderly.htm

This website has some easy and healthy dinner recipes for people over the age of 65 who have one or more degenerative disorders such as heart disease, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, macular degeneration, and osteoporosis. The recipes are slightly more "involved" and require more than just some simple ingredients.


QUICK DINNER IDEAS

Quick, easy dinner ideas


JUST SNACKING?

Seniors, after all, are just human. And like other humans we love our snacks. Unfortunately, our more sedentary lifestyles don’t allow us to burs up those calories like we did when we were 17. But take heart.There is still snacking in our lives.


HEALTHY? YES. BORING? NO
https://seniors.lovetoknow.com/Snacks_for_Elderly

More healthy, but not too boring snacks


SWEET TREATS
https://www.umh.org/assisted-independent-living-blog/sweet-and-healthy-snacks-for-seniors

Popsicles? Yes, and other sweet snacks for seniors




DON'T WANT TO COOK...

If you hate the idea of cooking, or going to the store or your just tired of planning a meal for yourself why not allow someone else do it for you.

MEAL DELIVERY

I can’t say I’ve used any of the sites listed but the idea intrigues me. I’ll let you be the judge. If you try one let me know.


SENIORS EAT OUT.…

Like food? Love to eat out? Me too. But not all restaurants are conducive for those of us who prefer a more relaxed (and quieter) atmosphere. Here are two websites that can help.


QUIET RESTAURANTS?
https://sixtyandme.com/how-to-find-a-quiet-senior-friendly-restaurant/

Not a restaurant guide but there are tips on how to find a restaurant that lets you hear the person seated next to you.


ON THE CHEAP!
https://livingonthecheap.com/restaurants-offering-senior-discounts/

An A to Z list of your favorite restaurants and the senior discounts they offer.



See more cartoons in our cartoon gallery
http://wcenterblog.yolasite.com/cartoon-gallery.php





NEXT NEW BLOG TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Sunday, November 14, 2021






NOVEMBER 14, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


Here’s how Medicare beneficiaries can appeal
income-related charges that result in higher premiums

By Sarah O'Brien

Some older Americans may be all too familiar with sticker shock when it comes to their Medicare premiums.


That is, instead of paying the standard premium for Part B (outpatient care coverage) and Part D (prescription drug coverage), their income is high enough for monthly “income-related adjustment amounts,” or IRMAAs, to kick in. However, the surcharge is typically based on their tax return from two years earlier — which may not accurately reflect their current financial situation.

“For some clients, their income from two years prior is significantly higher than it is today or will be when they retire,” said Elizabeth Gavino, founder of Lewin & Gavino and an independent broker and general agent for Medicare plans.




Now is the time for for older adults,
their caregivers: aging services leaders


As the country waits for movement on the historic $1.75 trillion social spending bill, long-term care advocates are ramping up campaigns angling to refocus attention on the sector.


Argentum said it remains “deeply disappointed” that the Build Back Better Act still does not include senior living and is unlikely to be modified before it is considered by the House. The association signaled “these next few weeks could not b more important to the future of the industry,” pinning hopes on Senate changes to the legislation.

Argentum also urged the administration to “reverse course” and target COVID-19 relief through the latest and final phase of Provider Relief Funds to assisted living and memory care communities.




Nursing Homes Lose 221,000 Employees During COVID,
Who's Taking Care of Our Seniors?


Nursing homes across the country are feeling the effects of the ongoing labor shortages, according to multiple reports.


Nursing home jobs are down 221,000, or 14% since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the worst labor shortage among all health care providers, according to a report released by the American Health Care Association (AHCA) and the National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL), which represents over 14,000 nursing homes in the U.S.

Outpatient care and offices of physicians have seen job gains coming out of the pandemic while home health care services and hospitals are either near or close to full employment, according to the report.



Assisted Living Facilities Temporarily in a “Doughnut Hole”
regarding Federal Vaccine Mandates


Although highly anticipated rulemaking by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) on November 4, 2021 to implement portions of the President’s COVID-19 Action Plan dealing with vaccine mandates for Medicare and Medicaid participating facilities (the “CMS Vaccine Mandate Rule”), and businesses having 100 or more employees (the “Vaccine ETS”), respectively, generally aligned with expectations, one notable surprise was an exemption from the OSHA Vaccine ETS for healthcare settings subject to the OSHA Emergency Temporary Standard for Healthcare issued on June 21, 2021 (the “Healthcare ETS”).


While the aforementioned exemption is logical given that both agencies worked closely together to ensure that the requirements of the CMS Vaccine Mandate Rule and OSHA’s Vaccine ETS were complementary and not overly duplicative, the effect of OSHA’s exemption in the Vaccine ETS for healthcare settings subject to the OSHA Healthcare ETS, places assisted living facilities (ALFs) in a doughnut hole where neither the CMS Vaccine Mandate Rule nor the OSHA Vaccine ETS applies to these facilities, at least temporarily.



Type of fat, not how much, linked to stroke risk
By Kaitlin Sullivan

Fat in the diet has long been linked to stroke risk, but new research presented Monday suggests that it’s the type of fat, not the amount, that may be the more important factor.



The study found that eating more animal fat was linked to a higher risk of stroke, while getting more fat from vegetable sources was linked to a lower risk.


Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the U.S., and nutritionists have long worked to understand how diet plays a role.







The Special Bond of Older Dogs
 and Older Owners



When Barbara Castleman and her husband visited an animal shelter in Albuquerque, N.M., several years ago, they were surprised to find a purebred toy Australian shepherd available for adoption. While it would have cost them thousands of dollars to purchase such a dog from a breeder, 10-year-old Stella's pet adoption fee was only $40 because she was a "senior" — and Castleman received an additional $10 discount because she herself was over 50.



"Best of all, before taking her home, the shelter vet asked if they could give her a free dental exam, saving us hundreds of dollars. Imagine, for what we'd spend on lunch out, we've gotten years of unconditional love and companionship," Castleman said.



Stories like these are popping up around the country as shelters and rescue organizations implement so-called "Seniors for Seniors" programs. The idea is simple: discount or waive adoption fees for older adults who want to adopt pets aged 7 and up. Some organizations even cover medical bills for vaccinations, surgeries and dental care prior to adoption. In addition to the financial incentives, senior dogs can make ideal companions because they are typically housetrained and need less exercise than puppies.






Big Pharma spending $263M
to keep drug prices high

By Kris Van Cleave
Read more  >>  https://www.cbsnews.com/news/big-pharma-lower-prescription-drug-prices/
=======================================================
How To Avoid Reverse Mortgage Lending Traps
By Natalie Campisi
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/advisor/mortgages/avoid-reverse-mortgage-lending-traps/
========================================================  
Many older adults use sleep
medications every night
Read more  >>  https://www.healio.com/news/psychiatry/20211102/many-older-adults-use-sleep-medications-every-night
========================================================
For Older Drivers, Choosing Certain
Car Models Can Make A Difference

By Tanya Mohn
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/tanyamohn/2021/10/28/for-older-drivers-choosing-certain-car-models-can-make-a-difference/?sh=face9db3a924
=======================================================
What does President Biden’s vaccine mandate mean
for nursing homes and assisted living centers?

By Marin Wolf
Read more  >> https://www.dallasnews.com/business/health-care/2021/11/04/what-does-president-bidens-vaccine-mandate-mean-for-nursing-homes-and-assisted-living-centers/
========================================================
House Votes to Protect Job Applicants
From Discrimination

By Kenneth Terrell
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/work/job-search/info-2021/protect-older-job-applicants-act.html
========================================================
Strategies for managing opioid use in elderly patients
By Reema Hammoud
Read more  >>  https://medcitynews.com/2021/11/strategies-for-managing-opioid-use-in-elderly-patients/
=========================================================
One-Quarter of US Seniors Have Less Than
$500 in Medical Savings --
Here are Some Options to Cover Costs

By Vance Cariaga
Read more  >>  https://www.gobankingrates.com/saving-money/health/one-quarter-seniors-less-than-500-dollars-medical-savings-options-cover-costs/
=========================================================
Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees
at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

By Amy Norton
Read more  >>  https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-11-02/almost-1-in-3-us-seniors-now-sees-at-least-5-doctors-per-year
=========================================================
Older adults are using marijuana
more than ever before

HANNAH CRITCHFIELD
Read more  >>  https://www.miamiherald.com/news/article255619561.html
=========================================================
Assisted living providers sound the alarm
over lack of COVID-19 aid

By Karl Evers-Hillstrom
Read more  >>  https://thehill.com/business-a-lobbying/business-a-lobbying/580042-assisted-living-providers-sound-the-alarm-over-lack
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How to Thrive as a Solo Ager
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/series/solo-ager-thrive/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=2e535b2f89-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_04__COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-2e535b2f89-165407981&mc_cid=2e535b2f89&mc_eid=94767a79b9
==========================================================
LifeBio releases cognitive,
memory care app for older adults

By Emily Olsen
Read more  >>  https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/lifebio-releases-cognitive-memory-care-app-older-adults
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Here's how having pets can benefit senior citizens
Read more  >>  https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/healthandwellness/810161/here-s-how-having-pets-can-benefit-senior-citizens/story/
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Older adults previously infected with COVID-19
generate greater immune response, new study shows

by: Dr. Mary Gillis, D.Ed.
Read more  >>  https://www.wishtv.com/news/medical/older-adults-previously-infected-with-covid-19-generate-greater-immune-response-new-study-shows/
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Why older adults have a higher risk of severe COVID-19
Read more  >>  https://www.futurity.org/severe-covid-19-older-adults-2653822/
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Playing Video Games for 30 Minutes a Day
Slashes Your Dementia Risk

By Zachary Mack
Read more  >>  https://bestlifeonline.com/news-video-games-dementia/
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The Truth About Those Medicare Advantage TV Commercials
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/medicare-advantage-truth/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=b93fc00d89-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_09_21_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-b93fc00d89-165407981&mc_cid=b93fc00d89&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===========================================================
It’s Time to Address Loneliness for Older Populations
By Michael Weissel
Read more  >>  https://www.brinknews.com/its-time-to-address-loneliness-for-older-populations/
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10 Things to Avoid for a Healthier Heart
By Jeanette Beebe
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/avoiding-unhealthy-heart-habits.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-110921-P1-5923039&ET_CID=5923039&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
============================================================
Reframing Aging during COVID‐19:
Familial Role‐Based Framing of Older Adults
Linked to Decreased Ageism

By Reuben Ng PhD
Read more  >>  https://agsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.17532








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Good Day. It’s Thursday, November 11, 2021





NOVEMBER 11, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com




Playing Video Games for 30 Minutes a Day
Slashes Your Dementia Risk

By Zachary Mack

Facing the risk of dementia is an unfortunate part of the aging process. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it's estimated that 5.8 million people currently have Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias, including 5.6 million of whom are 65 or older. Thankfully, research devoted to the degenerative condition is beginning to help shed light on how to treat it, lessen its effects, or potentially avoid it entirely. And in one recent study, researchers found that doing one activity in particular for 30 minutes each day could significantly reduce the risk of dementia in older adults. Keep reading to see what could help give you a brain boost.



A study published in the journal Behavioural Brain Research in May 2020 gathered participants between the ages of 60 and 80 to test how video games that use a 3D environment might affect memory and cognitive health. The researchers hypothesized that games such as Super Mario World might have more benefits than two-dimensional games such as solitaire while also including dynamic flat-play games such as Angry Birds in testing. Participants were then asked to play 30 to 45 minutes of a specific game each day for four weeks, with researchers conducting memory tests throughout the experiment and for four weeks after gameplay had stopped.




The Truth About Those Medicare Advantage
TV Commercials

Why the 'Friends Talk Money' podcast hosts say the 'free' policy come-ons can be misleading


Odds are, you've seen those Medicare Advantage TV commercials featuring the likes of William Shatner, George Foreman, Jimmie Walker and Joe Namath touting the "free" health insurance plans offering enticing benefits not available from so-called "Original Medicare" (also called "traditional Medicare"). But are they for real?


Now that it's Medicare Open Enrollment season through Dec. 7, if you're 65 or older and eligible for Medicare, or a loved one is, you'll want to know the answer.




It’s Time to Address Loneliness for Older Populations
By Michael Weissel

Loneliness represents an opportunity to create and nurture human connections that ultimately improve people’s well-being but also their long-term health.



For the last year, virtually everyone has struggled with quarantine-related feelings of social isolation or loneliness. But senior citizens have struggled with loneliness long before COVID-19 forced us all into isolation. For decades, loneliness among seniors has led to resultant chronic conditions that were more profound than obesity, a lack of physical activity and excessive alcohol consumption.

Its impact is the equivalent of smoking 15 cigarettes every day.




10 Things to Avoid for a Healthier Heart
By Jeanette Beebe


There’s good news and bad news when it comes to your risk of developing heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Let’s start with the bad. Several factors raise a person’s risk for getting heart disease — a term used to describe a range of conditions that affect the heart — including some that can’t be controlled, such as family history, and others that are more complex, like having access to good-for-you foods and safe, affordable housing.



That said, there's a lot you can do to prevent heart disease and, in certain cases, reverse it. Some of these actions, however difficult to achieve, are obvious: Get active, eat better, lose weight, and stop smoking. "Lifestyle changes are difficult for everyone," concedes Sabra Lewsey, M.D., a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine, "but they are profoundly important and can make ​lifesaving gains in your health."

Others are more surprising.

Here are 10 habits to avoid if you’re hoping to improve your heart health.



Reframing Aging during COVID‐19:
Familial Role‐Based Framing of Older Adults

Linked to Decreased Ageism
By Reuben Ng PhD

Contributions of older adults amid the COVID-19 pandemic have been eclipsed by discourse positioning them as an at-risk population. We assess whether age-based framing (e.g., senior citizen) is associated with more negative stereotyping in the media compared to familial role-based framing (e.g., grandparent) across 8 months, from a baseline period (October 2019–December 2019) to the onset of the pandemic (January 2020–May 2020).


Methods

Leveraging a 12-billion-word news media database—with over 30 million news articles from over 7000 websites—we identified the most common synonyms for age-based framing (e.g., senior citizen) and familial role-based framing (e.g., grandparent). For each framing category, we compiled the most frequently used descriptors every month, amassing 488,907 descriptors in total. All descriptors were rated from 1 (very negative) to 5 (very positive) to determine a Cumulative Aging Narrative Score (CANS) for age-based and familial role-based framing.








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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, November 10, 2021





Back To It…
But Where Is Everybody?

All it took was one meal, together with our friends in our dining room, to get us back to our “normal” routine as residents here at the ALF. It’s almost as if the 30-day-long quarantine never happened.
 
It was great to see the lobby area here, populated with familiar faces waiting for breakfast on Monday morning. No more eating meals out of plastic containers with plastic utensils and food to match. However, as the time for them to open the dining room doors drew near, one thing was obvious. Where was everybody?

 
Often our lobby is busy even between meal times. It’s a place where residents can sit, in leather chairs or sofas and discuss the matters of the day with their friends. And, it gets particularly crowded when one group of diners is leaving while another waits for the staff to set up for the second seating. So crowded that it’s often difficult to find a place to sit. But on Monday, and again Tuesday, seats were in abundance. The usual rank of residents, noticeably thinner.

The lack of bodies became more apparent as people found their way to their usual tables. Many of the seats were empty, and some tables had no diners at all.
 
At first I thought perhaps some of our residents did not get the message we were re-opening and were waiting for their meal to be brought to them. That, combined with setting our clocks back one hour the day before, may have caused additional confusion, accounting for the sparse turnout. However, as the first meal became the second and then third and fourth and the tables and seats remained empty, it was clear there were fewer residents here than before the lockdown.

Did some of our residents decide to leave rather than have to go through the ordeal of yet another lockdown? Are there more people in the hospital than we were told? Or has natural attrition combined with the inability to attract new residents depleted the population?
 
Obviously, this is not the best time to consider a communal living environment. The strict anti-infection control protocols are not conducive to those that wish to live a normal life. If you decide to move into an assisted living facility now, you will automatically surrender many of your basic freedoms. Including trips to public places like restaurants, malls and supermarkets. Visits with friends and relatives are also curtailed, as are many of the activities prevalent in senior care venues. The only people you may communicate with are staff and other residents. This is not something most people would put up with.

Eventually, I’m sure the number of residents will return to our pre-pandemic census of 85%. Meanwhile, we can enjoy a little more elbow room. The only problem is how will the reduced population affect the bottom line of the corporation that owns and runs this facility. With ALF's and nursing homes experiencing financial hardships, the last thing we need is for this place to close…………………….

 

NOVEMBER 10, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


LifeBio releases cognitive,
memory care app for older adults

By Emily Olsen

Aging tech company LifeBio on Monday released the LifeBio Memory app aimed at improving care and quality of life for seniors, especially ones with dementia or other cognitive issues.


The app allows older adults and caregivers to record stories and have conversations using prompts from the app about the senior’s life. They can also upload photos and access a care-planning document, which collects information about the senior’s experiences and preferences.

"We're excited to officially announce LifeBio Memory, which revolutionizes person-centered care by addressing the health challenges of depression and loneliness, as well as truly engaging those with Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment," said Beth Sanders, CEO and founder of LifeBio, in a statement.




Older adults previously infected with COVID-19
generate greater immune response, new study shows

by: Dr. Mary Gillis, D.Ed.

Studies show COVID-19 antibodies decline as early as six months after getting the full dose of the vaccine. But what role does a prior infection play when it comes to immunity?



The native coronavirus was responsible for infecting hundreds of thousands of people across the U.S. But when the virus began to mutate, scientists turned their attention to developing strains.


However, scientists at the University of Montreal have a message: There are lessons to be learned from the past.




Why older adults have a higher
risk of severe COVID-19

A new study uncovers the cellular mechanism and molecular events that explain why some people, including the elderly, have a higher risk of COVID-19 infection as well as of severe side effects and death.


Those at higher risk also include patients with preexisting medical conditions including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases like COPD and asthma.

“This paper details a major discovery in COVID-19,” says immunologist Jack A. Elias, dean of medicine and biological sciences at Brown University and corresponding author of the paper in JCI Insight. “It shows that levels of a protein called chitinase 3-like-1 increase with age as well as co-morbid diseases and infection. What’s more, chitinase 3-like-1 augments SARS CoV-2 infection.”






Why and how seniors should learn to use technology
By  MICHAEL OWEN

Instead of tuning out when confronted with a smartphone or social media account, senior citizens can learn a few basics to take away the fear and confusion. Whether you need to learn how to turn the computer on and off, or just need to make sense of a few things, there’s a learning path for you.

Why Bother Learning Technology?



There’s no going back to the pre-technology days, and seniors need to get with the program or prepare to be left behind. If you don’t learn some technology, you will have an increasingly hard time doing basic things like making a phone call or paying a bill. And you will miss out on the speed, efficiency, and other attractive capabilities of these new methods.


Once you learn the basics, you’ll be able to find many helpful free tools. Valuable programs, from calorie counters to financial management systems, are available free online. For instance, OneLaunch provides a handy but unobtrusive dashboard for you to access your favorite items.











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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, November 9, 2021






NOVEMBER 9, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com




Older adults are using marijuana
more than ever before

HANNAH CRITCHFIELD

Marvin Yeoman, 74, had tried cannabis as a young adult, but for his wife, it was new.

“I never, never, ever even thought about marijuana when I was growing up — never in college, as a young adult or as a middle-aged adult,” said Rene Yeoman, 71. “It was just not even something that was on my radar.”


The Land O’ Lakes residents had both undergone recent major surgeries, so they gave in to their daughter’s suggestion to use the drug to treat chronic pain.

Rene Yeoman discovered she liked how edibles helped her sleep through the night and avoid the use of other medications.





Assisted living providers sound the alarm
over lack of COVID-19 aid

By Karl Evers-Hillstrom


Senior living providers are mounting a last-ditch effort to secure pandemic aid in Democrats’ $1.75 trillion social spending bill after they were largely excluded from previous relief packages.


Industry trade group Argentum says that assisted living facilities, which care for around 2 million seniors, have lost $30 billion during the pandemic due to increased expenses and low occupancy rates compounded by staff shortages. But these operators have only received $640 million in COVID-19 relief, a sliver of the $178 billion Provider Relief Fund that has favored hospitals and nursing homes.

Argentum is pushing lawmakers to allow senior living facilities to access the reconciliation package’s massive caregiving grants and benefit from its workforce development programs. They are excluded under the current bill that House Democrats aim to pass soon.




How to Thrive as a Solo Ager


What does it mean to be a solo ager? There are currently 12 million of us in the United States who are single by choice, live without a spouse or partner or are widowed or divorced. We may never have had children or are estranged from them.


In this collection of Next Avenue stories, experts offer personal advice and resources for navigating social, emotional and practical topics that solo agers may want to consider.


For instance, how do you develop or strengthen your safety net of key individuals to help you grow older?




OPINION:

Risk increasing for American seniors


Are seniors on the verge of being left behind?

We worked hard all our lives to provide for our families with necessities and comforts of life.


Now, we are seniors who helped make our country great and shored up the values of our wonderful Constitution, are in danger of losing the only source of income most of us depend on in our retirement years. Congress can’t come together to prevent our economy from going over the cliff into the abyss.










We rented our home when we moved into an RV.
Now, eviction moratoriums have cost us our entire savings.

By Jamie Killin


This is the story of a couple who rented their home in California and stopped receiving payments during the pandemic, as told to freelance writer Jamie Killin. Insider reviewed the lease agreement and court documents between the landlords and renters. We've chosen to keep all names private.


When my husband, who's 74, and I, a disabled 65-year-old woman, decided to live out of an RV, we leased our house in California, with an option to buy to a young couple with a toddler. Shortly after they moved into the house in February 2020, the pandemic struck and they quit paying rent.


With eviction moratoriums in the US — which have been off and on since the beginning of the pandemic, and were most recently ended by the Supreme Court in August — they've now cost us our entire savings.










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NEXT NEW BLOG WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Monday, November 8, 2021











By the time you read this, me and my fellow residents will have had our first meal together in over a month. The most recent insult to our freedom, another lengthy quarantine/lockdown, has ended.
 
When we were informed on October 8 that over 3 of our residents had tested positive for COVID-19, and we would once again be subject to the infection control protocols mandated by the NY State DOH, we were not happy but; we were resigned. After all. We had just come off of a 16
month ordeal so another two weeks would be child’s play. Unfortunately, because an additional case was discovered during those initial two weeks, they had to re-start the clock and add another 14 days to our sentence. That time has ended, and hopefully, we will return to normalcy. But many questions remain.
 
Did we all need to be quarantined when only three residents tested positive? And, considering that 99% of us had been fully vaccinated, was any curtailing of our activities necessary at all? We’ll never know because no one is going to spend time and money to investigate the situation. It’s just so much easier to lock us up for two weeks and let the chips fall where they may.

On the upside, if there is one, I have spent my incarceration by adding to the U.S. economy by shopping online. I won’t tell how much I’ve spent. Let’s just say the $1400 stimulus check is a memory. It was not spent flippantly. I bought important stuff like pants, shaving supplies, underwear and food. My only concession to frivolity was the purchase (or, as I like to call it, adoption) of three houseplants.
 
My flourishing display of green living things that once adorned my windowsill all died during that original 16 month lockdown. I tried growing new plants from seeds, but none of them took. Clearly, I had lost my green thumb. So when an ad popped-up for a houseplant sale at Wayfair, I could not resist taking a peek. Admittedly, I was a little leery about buying living plants online. How would they be shipped? What condition would they be in when they arrived? Would they look like they do in the photos? The answers are, “Within 4 days.” “In excellent condition and exactly as they appear in the photos.” I was amazed. Here were three green, leafy, robust houseplants ready to be put on my windowsill. All they needed was a little water. They even came with some nice ceramic planters. My congratulations to Costa Farms (growers) and Wayfair. BTW, the 3 plants, including shipping, cost only $44. I’ll try my best not to kill them. ……………..
 



NOVEMBER 8, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


What does President Biden’s vaccine mandate mean
 for nursing homes and assisted living centers?

By Marin Wolf

Nearly 17 million workers in nursing homes, hospitals and other Medicare and Medicaid-funded facilities must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Jan. 4 under a stricter mandate included in a workplace safety agency’s new rules.



The Occupational Safety and Health Administration released new COVID-19 vaccine requirements for U.S. workers Thursday. It toughened the rules for health care workers, giving them no option to instead get tested weekly for the virus. They can still seek exemptions on medical or religious grounds.

The latest move in the government’s effort to raise vaccination rates in the U.S. immediately drew concern from the largest association of senior living providers.




House Votes to Protect Job Applicants
 From Discrimination

By Kenneth Terrell

A bill that that would better protect older Americans from age discrimination in the hiring process passed the U.S. House of Representatives on Nov. 4 by a vote of 224 to 200.



The Protect Older Job Applicants Act would amend the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) to specifically prohibit employers from limiting, segregating or classifying job applicants based on their ages. In recent years, court decisions have weakened the protections the ADEA provides, with some rulings asserting that the law does not explicitly protect job applicants.


“Age discrimination in the workplace — against older workers or others — is never acceptable,” says Nancy LeaMond, AARP executive vice president and chief advocacy and engagement officer. “Americans age 55 and up experience long-term unemployment at a higher rate compared to younger job seekers, and age discrimination makes it harder for older workers to find new jobs or return to the workforce. This bill to restore Age Discrimination in Employment Act protections to job applicants will help provide a level playing field for older workers when applying for a job.”



Strategies for managing opioid use
in elderly patients
By Reema Hammoud

In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, it’s easy for anyone to forget that there are other large-scale epidemics going on in the world. In the U.S. especially, the opioid crisis rages on despite being all but forgotten by the public. According to the CDC, drug overdose deaths were up a grim 30.9% year over year during 2020, with a significant portion of the 94,134 deaths caused by opioids.



Senior citizens are most at risk of misusing and abusing opioids, as they rely on this type of medication for treatment more than younger adults. A new USC survey found that one in 10 adults is at risk for an opioid overdose. However, physicians play an important role in reducing the risk of opioid misuse in this population – much of this risk can be avoided with better intervention and tracking.


With seniors especially vulnerable to the opioid epidemic, physicians can step up opioid tapering programs that have a proven track record of success while simultaneously instituting mitigation plans through strong, personal relationships and micro and macro metrics.




One-Quarter of US Seniors Have Less Than
 $500 in Medical Savings --
 Here are Some Options to Cover Costs

By Vance Cariaga

Among the biggest expenses many American seniors are likely to face are medical bills, but a substantial number don’t have nearly enough money saved up to cover them, according to a new survey from MedicareGuide.com. For these Americans, finding alternative solutions is a major priority.


See: Social Security Update: New Bill Could Benefit Seniors Immensely by Improving Cost-of-Living Formula
Find: Unclear on Social Security Benefits? These Are the 4 Types Seniors Should Know

The survey of 1,176 U.S. adults aged 65 and older, conducted in September and released last month, found that 27% of respondents have less than $500 in savings to pay for medical bills. About one-quarter carry medical debt, while more than one-third said they found it either difficult or very difficult to pay for health care. More than one-quarter (28%) said they would have to use non-medical savings to pay for a severe illness — including dipping into their retirement accounts.



Almost 1 in 3 U.S. Seniors Now Sees
at Least 5 Doctors Per Year

By Amy Norton

Nearly one-third of older U.S. adults visit at least five different doctors each year — reflecting the growing role of specialists in Americans' health care, a new study finds.



Over the past 20 years, Americans on Medicare have been increasingly seeing specialists, researchers found, with almost no change in visits with their primary care doctor.


On average, beneficiaries saw a 34% increase in the number of specialists they visited each year. And the proportion of patients seeing five or more doctors rose from about 18% in 2000, to 30% in 2019.


=//=




80 Top Games for Seniors and the Elderly:
Fun for All Abilities


Get ready to play! It's time to learn about the best games for seniors so that you can reap the benefits of having fun. After all, joy, amusement, and mental stimulation are necessary for every senior's overall well-being. And we all have days when we just want to pass a little time by doing something engaging.



Games provide convenient ways to have fun, either alone or as part of a group. They eradicate boredom, relieve stress, and make parties and other social engagements easier, more enjoyable, and less intimidating. They also help exercise our brains. For some people, playing certain types of games might be beneficial for things like mood, memory, concentration, reasoning, and imagination. Games might be especially helpful for your brain if they require you to learn something new.

Plus, countless games can be modified for seniors or elderly people who have physical or cognitive limitations. For example, it's easy to find or create games that have large type, which is good for older people who have vision problems. And if time or attention spans are a concern, many games can be played and completed in less than 30 minutes.








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Good Day. It’s Sunday, November 7, 2021



GOOD NEWS. THE QUARANTINE ENDS MONDAY WITH
A RETURN TO ALL ACTIVITIES




NOVEMBER 7, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



Social Security 2022:
How the COLA Will Increase Benefits
for the Average Senior Couple

In 2021, the average monthly Social Security benefit came out to $1,565. After a 5.9% cost-of-living adjustment scheduled to go into effect next year, the average benefit will rise to about $1,657 according to the Social Security Administration. This means that the average couple could see roughly $3,000 a month.


The roughly $100 increase comes after a year of unprecedented inflation. Over the past 12 months, prices have increased 6% in nearly all major sectors, and especially important for seniors, in every major grocery store category. COLA increases in the past couple of years have been around 1-1.3%. This year’s adjustment is one of the highest COLA jumps in decades.




___________________________________________



Big Pharma spending $263M
to keep drug prices high

By Kris Van Cleave


Lowering prescription drug prices is among the Biden administration's most urgent priorities. But the drug industry is spending big to keep that from happening.



A new compromise on Capitol Hill would offer some relief from high prices by gradually allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices similar to private insurers for the first time, while capping out of pocket costs at $2,000 and setting limits on the cost of insulin.


"This is the time to get real relief to senior citizens who are getting mugged at the pharmacy counter," Democratic Senator Ron Wyden said.


_____________________________________


How To Avoid Reverse Mortgage Lending Traps
By Natalie Campisi

Reverse mortgages are loans designed for people over 62 years old that are secured by their biggest asset: their home. Although it can be a useful tool for tapping equity without paying monthly loan payments while in the home, it can also be risky if the borrower is not fully aware of what they (and their heirs) might be committing to.



That’s partly why the government has recently cited some reverse mortgage lenders for deceptive and misleading lending practices, which have led to senior homeowners losing their homes in some cases.


For instance, last month, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) cited American Advisors Group (AAG) for allegedly misleading people with “inflated and deceptive home estimates to lure consumers into taking out reverse mortgages.” The CFPB, responsible for overseeing consumer financial protection laws, declined to comment on the consent order.


________________________________________________


Many older adults use sleep medications every night


“Utilizing a one-time mailed survey of patients aged 65 and older who were prescribed common sleep medications and identified using administrative claims data, we found that patients reported frequent medications to treat sleep difficulties, with the majority of those surveyed using a sleep medication every night,” Maureen Carlyle, MPH, senior project manager for Optum Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) in Minnesota, said during a virtual presentation.
infographic with percentage of patients who reported nightly medication use
Infographic data derived from: Carlyle M, et al. Understanding the patient experience with insomnia symptoms and treatments: A survey that included older adults. Presented at: Psych Congress; Oct. 29-Nov. 1, 2021; San Antonio (hybrid meeting).



According to Carlyle and colleagues, older adults may be particularly vulnerable to insomnia, which is linked to increased comorbidity and polypharmacy and contributed to chronic physical and behavioral health conditions. In the current analysis, they sought to outline experiences with insomnia symptoms and treatments in a real-world setting among older patients. They used administrative claims data included in the Optum Research Database, which represents more than 73 million patients in the U.S.


Specifically, they analyzed data of patients who were insured with commercial plans or Medicare Advantage with Part D who had recent sleep medication history. They implemented a cross-sectional survey but administered no treatments or interventions. Included participants (n = 205; mean age, 73.2 years; 70.2% women; 97.6% insured by a .....


______________________________________________


For Older Drivers, Choosing Certain
 Car Models Can Make A Difference

By Tanya Mohn

Good visibility, features that are easy to use with as few distractions as possible, and driver assistance systems that can partially offset reduced driving performance and make stressful situations more manageable, are key factors when older drivers are looking for a suitable vehicle to purchase. Making the right choice can help keep older adults comfortable, preserve their mobility, and keep them and others on the road safe.



Those are the highlights of new research announced earlier this month by DEKRA, a company based in Germany that conducts automotive testing, inspection and crash research.


 “Direct and indirect visibility, driver assistance systems, and passive safety elements all have an important role to play when it comes to safety,” Markus Egelhaaf, a crash researcher for DEKRA, said in a statement.  



=//=




These Senior Citizens Have Way Better Style Than You
 By Karl Thomas Smith


They say that with age comes wisdom, an adage that is tested to the limit if you buy into the idea that America is a gerontocracy. When it comes to style, however, it’s safe to say that most people – even those elderly folks who can pretty much find a way to argue about anything – would hold up their hands and agree that such a take doesn't really apply.



There are, however, exceptions to every rule. Look how Steve Harvey broke the internet last week.



These exceptions take many forms and span decades – from the septuagenarian style connoisseur to the freshly bus-passed sartorial senior. What they all have in common, though, is the ability to put together a fit that transcends the age gap without coming off as try-hard or giving even the faintest sign of "How do you do, fellow kids?” Honestly, I’m 31 and I’m not entirely sure if I can always make that claim.


With that in mind, let us now introduce you to nine senior citizens – style elders, if you will – who not only have it together, but who probably have it down better than you, me, or any of us.






How Seniors Can Receive Financial Assistance
By Kelly Anne Smith
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/advisor/personal-finance/financial-help-for-senior-citizens/
========================================================
Longevity annuities can be a good deal for seniors.
 But not many people buy them

By Greg Iacurci
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/22/longevity-annuities-can-be-a-good-deal-for-seniors-but-not-many-people-buy-them.html
========================================================
7 Things Medicare Doesn’t Cover
Read more  >>  https://www.kiplinger.com/retirement/medicare/601489/7-things-medicare-doesnt-cover
========================================================
Weight Loss May Not Actually Make You Healthier
By Catherine Pearson
Read more  >>  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/weight-loss-may-not-make-you-healthier_l_61638056e4b0cc44c50dcbfe
========================================================
Medicaid issues, not Medicare's, get fixes in Biden budget
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Read more > https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-business-seniors-medicaid-nursing-homes-da7a976587393d1522d74b602964132d?user_email_address=f89549a6091d3844648cee1b23e28f41&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MorningWire_Oct29&utm_term=Morning%20Wire%20Subscribers
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When Conservatorship Goes Terribly Wrong
My family's troubling experience with the man
 appointed to manage my mother's life

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/when-conservatorship-goes-terribly-wrong/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ee9dedc90a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_10_28_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-ee9dedc90a-165407981&mc_cid=ee9dedc90a&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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Which Prescriptions Send Older Adults to the Hospital?
By Cheryl Weinstock
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2021/prescription-drug-emergency-side-effects.html
========================================================
6 ways to delete yourself from the internet:
Getting off the grid isn't as easy as it seems

By Eric Franklin
Go to article  >>  https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/6-ways-to-delete-yourself-from-the-internet-getting-off-the-grid-isnt-as-easy-as-it-seems/
========================================================
Medicare and Dental Coverage:
 A Closer Look

Read more >> Read more >>  https://www.kff.org/medicare/issue-brief/medicare-and-dental-coverage-a-closer-look/
========================================================
Seniors in Pain Want to Try Cannabis
But the Past Stigma around the Plant Prevents
Them from Trying It Says New Survey

Read more  >>  https://cannabis.net/blog/news/seniors-in-pain-want-to-try-cannabis-but-the-past-stigma-around-the-plant-prevents-them-from-tr
========================================================
Is Taking Baby Aspirin Still Safe?
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/should-you-be-taking-baby-aspirin/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ee9dedc90a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_10_28_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-ee9dedc90a-165407981&mc_cid=ee9dedc90a&mc_eid=94767a79b9
========================================================
More Middle-Aged, Older Women
 Getting 'Broken Heart' Syndrome

By Amy Norton
Read more  >>  https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-10-18/more-middle-aged-older-women-getting-broken-heart-syndrome
========================================================
What Biden’s Latest Build Back Better Plan
 Means For Older Adults

By Howard Gleckman
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2021/10/29/what-bidens-latest-build-back-better-plan-means-for-older-adults/?sh=6a0a94397494
========================================================
Know the facts and plan ahead
for extended care needs

Read more  >>  https://azbigmedia.com/business/know-the-facts-and-plan-ahead-for-extended-care-needs/
=========================================================
Age-related hearing loss is more
 common than you may think

By Dr. Jesse Tan
Read more  >>  https://www.presstelegram.com/2021/10/18/senior-living-age-related-hearing-loss-is-more-common-than-you-may-think/
=========================================================
Are Too Many Older Adults Told
 They Have Kidney Disease?

Read more  >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/01/well/live/chronic-kidney-disease-failure.html
=========================================================
Family feels less guilt when loved one moves
 to assisted living versus nursing home: study

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/family-feels-less-guilt-when-loved-one-moves-to-assisted-living-versus-nursing-home-study/
=========================================================
Who the Happiest Retirees and
 Most Unhappy Retirees Are

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/happiest-retirees-and-unhappy-retirees/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=4491bf1693-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_02_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-4491bf1693-165407981&mc_cid=4491bf1693&mc_eid=94767a79b9
=========================================================
6 Foods to Boost Your Immune System
 Through Cold and Flu Season

Read more  >>  https://www.geisinger.org/health-and-wellness/wellness-articles/2018/01/19/14/09/6-foods-to-boost-your-immune-system-through-cold-and-flu-season








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Good Day. It’s Thursday, November 4, 2021












If you were a reader of this blog during our 16 month state mandated lockdown ordeal, which included quarantine, isolation, and inactivity, you are aware of my frustration with the NY State Department of Health. Not only was I at complete disagreement with the lockdown and the way it was handled, but by the inability to find anybody to discuss the situation with as well. That all ended Wednesday when I unexpectedly met with a representative from that very department. As you can imagine, I had much to say.

An aide came to my room and told me I was needed in the conference room. Thinking it might have something to do with how to spend some grant money we are entitled to each year, I felt very unprepared. I had not given it much thought. But that was not why I was summoned. The real reason was a meeting with a representative from the DOH. It was as if I was contacting an alien being. So rarely do residents get to actually speak to anybody from the DOH that an encounter is indeed unusual. None the less, here I was. Alone with a real person.

“I’m here to discuss the quarantine,” she said. I was intrigued. Why now, and why with me?
 
While I’m not sure of the “Why me”, (perhaps it’s because I’m one of members of the resident’s council and one of the few residents management can trust to give a realistic view of the events of the past few weeks). However, I had something different in mind. I would not allow what might be my only chance to give the DOH a piece of my mind to go to waste.

“I’m going to be candid with you,” I told her. “That’s what I want,” she said.
 
I told her about our lengthy incarceration and how poorly we had been treated by the DOH. And how the lack of communication and the absence of anyone to complain to was cruel and unwarranted.
 
I explained how we were “warehoused” to ostensibly keep us safe from COVID, but in reality so that the state and the governor would not have to realistically deal with us.

I did my thing for a good 10 minutes, trying not to have my words interpreted as just the rantings of an old man. Then we got into the reason for her visit. She was interested to know about our current state of affairs regarding how our facility has handled the infection control procedures. I answered by clarifying that our facility is beyond reproach in keeping us safe. Except for the one mistake, that is the reason for our latest quarantine. A group trip to a buffet restaurant where several residents came in contact with citizens who may not have been as well protected as us. That outing caused at least 4 of our residents to test positive for the virus. And, only because all had been vaccinated prior to this incident, none were severe.
 
I spent about 20 minutes with the representative, with most of my time used to voice my concerns over any future lock-downs. I was very insistent that each ALF should be individualized and not be subject to a blanket protocol just to take the easy way out by locking us up.
 
Whether this encounter made any real difference, I cannot say. But I left that meeting feeling encouraged and hopeful and grateful that somebody listened/ Meanwhile, we are still in our current lockdown with a tentative lifting of the protocols due Monday, November 8…………..
 


NOVEMBER 4, 2021



Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


Are Too Many Older Adults Told
 They Have Kidney Disease?


If the public has learned anything about medicine during the Covid-19 pandemic, it is that science is constantly evolving. New findings can change how experts define a given illness, as well as how they diagnose, prevent and treat it.



Such is the case, a new study suggests, with chronic kidney disease. A growing cadre of physicians are combating what they call an over-diagnosis of this condition in the elderly. According to these doctors, many older adults who’ve been told their kidneys are on the road to failure may not have anything more than a normal age-related decline in kidney function. For many, their kidney disease is unlikely to become a medical problem during their remaining years of life.


This, in fact, is exactly what happened to a friend’s mother who was told she had kidney disease in her late 70s. She received drug treatment for the disorder and recently died at 92 of a combination of old age, malnutrition and bedsores, but with kidneys that still worked perfectly.


_____________________________________


Stress from the pandemic has made even
 basic decision-making difficult, poll finds

By Elizabeth Chuck


Stress from the pandemic has people struggling to make decisions large and small, with nearly a third of adults questioning even basic day-to-day choices, according to a new report.



The American Psychological Association's "Stress in America" survey, conducted by the Harris Poll, found that 32 percent of adults are so stressed by the pandemic, they sometimes wrestle with daily tasks, such as choosing what to eat or what to wear.

"Our bodies don’t differentiate where the stress is coming from. They just know we’re stressed. So when that level of uncertainty starts to overwhelm our coping mechanisms, even the smallest tasks can start to feel overwhelming," said Vaile Wright, a clinical psychologist and the senior director of health care innovation at the American Psychological Association.


____________________________________


Family feels less guilt when loved one moves
 to assisted living versus nursing home: study



The majority of older adults (79%) responding to Genworth’s Caregiving in COVID-19 Beyond Dollars Study 2021 said they preferred to receive care in their homes, but only 42% actually received assistance at home. Comparatively, 5% said they wanted to be cared for in an assisted living community, whereas 13% actually moved into a community.



Loved ones who moved an older adult into assisted living reported having greater feelings of guilt related to that move due limits to their ability to provide assistance (35%) compared with providing care at home (22%), moving an older adult into a caregiver’s home (15%) or sending an older adult to an adult day facility (9%). The feelings of guilt were greater for families with loved ones that moved into nursing homes, however (40%).
Long-term care insurance

Researchers said that the pandemic increased the belief in the importance of early planning — 29% of respondents in 2021 said they believed in long-term care insurance compared with 15% in 2018. The number of people who actually bought long-term care insurance has not changed significantly, however, remaining at 14% as in 2018.


_____________________________________


Who the Happiest Retirees and
 Most Unhappy Retirees Are



If you're curious how to become one of the happiest retirees and how to avoid becoming one of the least happy retirees, I can offer some surprising guidance.



That's because of what I learned reading two excellent, new books about all this and talking to their authors for Next Avenue and the "Friends Talk Money" podcast I co-host. (You can hear the episode wherever you get podcasts or at the end of this article.) Hint: when it comes to happiness in retirement, it's not just about the money.

What the Happiest Retirees Know

Certified Financial Planner Wes Moss comes at this based on surveys he conducted with about 2,000 U.S. households who were retired or within 10 years of retiring for his book "What the Happiest Retirees Know: 10 Habits for a Healthy, Secure, and Joyful Life." He calls the happiest ones HROBS, for Happiest Retirees on the Block. Moss is a managing partner and chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors in Atlanta.


______________________________________


6 Foods to Boost Your Immune System
 Through Cold and Flu Season



While there are a few different ways to fight against the common cold and the flu, your diet is one of your greatest assets.

“In cold weather and in dry air, it’s very easy for colds and the flu to spread,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Marianne Williams. “You can try to limit your contact with people who are sick, but sometimes that’s easier said than done. Your



best plan of action is to get a flu shot, get at least seven hours of sleep every night, pay attention to your symptoms, wash your hands and eat a healthy diet. All of these factors can help keep your immune system strong and keep you from getting sick.”




Here are 6 foods that can help boost your immunity and keep you healthy through cold and flu season.



Do you want more news and information about what foods are best for Seniors? Our SPECIAL FOOD ISSUE is coming soon







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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, November 3, 2021






NOVEMBER 3, 2021



Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


Democrats reach deal on Medicare
 prescription drug prices in social spending bill

By Jennifer Haberkorn


Hoping to show progress on a 15-year-old campaign promise, Democrats say they have reached an agreement to allow Medicare to negotiate prices on a limited number of prescription drugs as part of their social spending and climate plan.

Medicare drug price negotiation was one of the final unresolved issues on the $1.85-trillion bill, which Democrats hope to finish writing as soon as Tuesday. Other policy issues still subject to negotiation include climate and immigration.


The drug-price proposal was left out of a framework released last week by the White House, and some Democrats had been fighting to find a way to include a modified version.

Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Tuesday that a deal had been reached and that a key holdout, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) supported the plan. "This deal will directly reduce out-of-pocket drug spending for millions of patients every time they visit the pharmacy or doctor," Schumer said.


_______________________________________



What Biden’s Latest Build Back Better Plan
Means For Older Adults

By Howard Gleckman


President Biden’s scaled-down $1.7 trillion Build Back Better social spending and tax plan retains major benefit increases for Medicaid long-term care recipients as well as Medicare enrollees. But it trims more ambitious initiatives and drops an earlier proposal for family and medical leave.



Here are key elements of the plan, which likely will change as it works its way through Congress.


Medicare: Sen. Bernie Sanders and many progressive Democrats wanted to expand traditional fee-for-service Medicare so it would cover dental, vision, and hearing care. But Biden’s new plan would add coverage for hearing only. Combined with recent regulatory changes to allow hearing aids to be sold over-the-counter, this step could significantly improve the quality of life for many hearing-impaired older adults, including half of those over age 75.


_____________________________________


The new face of Miami’s homeless community
— senior citizens

By Mimi Whitefield

It’s a special Thursday afternoon at Mia Casa, a former assisted living center turned homeless shelter for the elderly during the pandemic.



As a professional salsa singer belts out familiar tunes, two residents join him on the claves and a few septuagenarians show they still have what it takes as they swivel their hips, wowing the other seniors with their fancy steps and dancing with the Mia Casa staff.


Others sit quietly sipping coffee as the staff passes out pastelitos, but the music soon entices even the reluctant to tap their toes or keep beat on the tables with their palms.


__________________________________________


Know the facts and plan ahead
for extended care needs


Planning for future extended care needs is an abstract concept for many individuals and families. We don’t know how we will age, what illnesses might impact us or possibly even who will care for us. Without personal experience, you may feel unsure how to quantify the financial impact. Many people don’t even want to talk about it. While medical advances have improved our health outcomes and extended our lives, the quality of those years comes into question. Extended care isn’t just about when you get old;  it can also provide care due to long term impairments related  to accidents, injuries or illness.



The price of care can be staggering and has been increasing dramatically over time. According to the Genworth Cost of Care Survey, the annual median care cost of an assisted living facility in the U.S. During 2020 was $51,600. And the median yearly cost of a private room in a skilled nursing facility was $105,850. Remember, these are median price points and may not include the luxury you are anticipating. It’s important to know the costs in your part of the country. These costs are often reflective of the “base” price, and additional fees may be charged for increased levels of care, products and personal services you may need.


_______________________________________


Age-related hearing loss is more
common than you may think

By Dr. Jesse Tan


Hearing loss can have many origins.

If you served in the military, used loud machinery to garden, or were a musician, chances are you have some form of hearing loss. Those are just a few examples. And some hearing loss runs in families and is hereditary.



There is also a large population of older adults, however, that experience mild-to-moderate hearing loss — simply because of their age.  


Approximately one in three people ages 65 to 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing, according to the National Institute on Aging. These are some astounding numbers!








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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4. 2021





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Unfortunately, Discus (the comments provider I use) is giving me trouble. Very long loading times and the inability to delete old comments is slowing down my ability to edit this blog. Therefore, it’s back to the drawing board and another comment box beta-test……..ed.





Good Day. It’s Tuesday, November 2, 2021








WAITING FOR SOME
GOOD NEWS

I was hoping to see a memo in my mailbox today announcing an end to our latest round of quarantine/lockdown. But alas, that was not forthcoming. Maybe tomorrow, maybe Wednesday. According to my calculations, the original lockdown was supposed to have ended on October 21ST. But because three new cases of COVID were discovered among our residents, an additional 2 weeks of incarceration was added for no good reason other than to annoy us. That would make November 4, the new freedom day. We’ll see. As far as I know, no additional new cases have been reported and we have all received our booster shot and a Covid test, too. The lack of communication around here is deafening. So, we wait. We are very good at waiting. Last year, we waited for over 16 months before they realized we were still here. I hope this will not be more of the same……………………….


NOVEMBER 2, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


Seniors in Pain Want to Try Cannabis
But the Past Stigma around the Plant Prevents
 Them from Trying It Says New Survey


Seniors in pain need cannabis but won't use it

The misconceptions about cannabis that began in the 1930s caused a massive stigma for the plant-based drug. This stigma is still present now, especially in the population that makes up those generations.


At least 40% of Americans who are above the age of 65 are suffering from several kinds of pain. Some experience it for a short while, while some have long-term pain.


For seniors above the age of 80, about 75% suffer from chronic pain. Especially the ones in assisted living quarters like nursing homes.




_____________________________________


Suicide rate of Michigan senior citizens
highest in 30 years
By Zaira Mogomedova

The suicide rate of Michigan senior citizens aged 75 and older in 2020 was the highest for this age group since 1991, according to state records.

It was also the highest rate of all age groups in 2020, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.


The number of all suicide deaths in Michigan slightly decreased last year from 1,471 to 1,432. But the rate is still concerning, said Dr. Debra Pinals, the medical director of Behavioral Health and Forensic Programs for the Department of Health and Human Services.


“Suicide was not in the top 10 causes of death last year. However, the rates are still higher than they were years ago. This is a national trend,” she said.


____________________________________

Is Taking Baby Aspirin Still Safe?

New draft recommendations offer guidance on who should (and shouldn't) be taking a low-dose aspirin to prevent a heart attack



Do you, or someone you love, swallow a baby aspirin (81 mg/day) every morning in hopes of preventing a heart attack or stroke? If so, you are not alone. A 2019 National Institutes of Health (NIH) survey found that about 29 million Americans without cardiovascular disease currently take a daily aspirin, many of them without their doctor's advice.


Now, new draft recommendations on the use of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular disease have come out from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). These guidelines only refer to primary prevention, defined as taking measures to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. Secondary prevention takes place after a cardiac event has occurred.


_____________________________________

More Middle-Aged, Older Women
 Getting 'Broken Heart' Syndrome

By Amy Norton

The number of Americans diagnosed with "broken heart" syndrome has steadily risen in the past 15 years — with the vast majority being women, a new study finds.



The condition, which doctors call stress cardiomyopathy, appears similar to a heart attack — with symptoms such as chest pain and breathlessness. But its cause is entirely different: Experts believe it reflects a temporary weakness in the heart muscle owing to a surge in stress hormones.


The condition got its nickname because it may arise within days of an emotionally difficult event, like the death of a loved one or a divorce. But other stressful situations, from a traffic accident to undergoing surgery, can also be triggers.


______________________________________


Social media helps senior citizens
stay connected


Social media represents a powerful revolution that has changed the globe. Social networks have brought changes that have impacted society and improved people’s lives.




Contrary to some stereotypes, the elderly have significantly benefited from social media. However, there are dangers associated with social networks which can escalate in the absence of safety measures.


Anne Barrett, director of the Pepper Institute on Aging and Public Policy at Florida State University, said, “For the most part, older adult’s issues with social media are much the same as those of younger people. On the positive side, it can provide social interaction, and social media can be an important source of these things for anyone who is physically limited in some way, regardless of their age.”







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Though not required, please feel free to add your email or website to your comments



Unfortunately, Discus (the comments provider I use) is giving me trouble. Very long loading times and the inability to delete old comments is slowing down my ability to edit this blog. Therefore, it’s back to the drawing board and another comment box beta-test……..ed.




Good Day. It’s Monday, November 1, 2021





NOVEMBER 1, 2021



Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com

Are you familiar with that big spending bill? You know, the one that began at $6 trillion, then $3.5 trillion and finally down to $1.75 trillion. Yes, that one. Did anybody really think the Republicans would ever approve anything close to three trillion dollars? Not even Joe Biden believed it. But that’s what smart negotiators do. They go high, their opponents go way low, and they meet somewhere in the middle. Nobody gets everything, and nobody walks away with nothing. I have no problem with that. That kind of give and take has been going on since biblical times when they argued over the price of a camel. But this is different.

 
Back then, one party got a camel, and the other got his money. Now, one party gets the price they want, while the other has to settle for 1/3 of a camel. And it’s the back half at that.

There is nothing wrong with $1.75 trillion. Most of us can’t imagine that much money. I had to Google to find how many zeros came after the 1.75.[1] But the problem is, in accepting that drastic cut, somebody got screwed…royally. You know who that is? That’s right. The group with the least clout. The group whose squeaky wheels rarely get greased. You and me. America’s Seniors.

The Democrats didn’t even blink when they decided the concessions they would make to the demands of the Conservative right would hit Seniors the hardest. The removal of prescription drug price decreases (previous versions would have allowed Medicare to negotiate prices). And the removal of Medicare funded dental and vision coverage. Of course, members of congress get those benefits all free from their health plan, so they don’t care. And besides. What is an old person going to do with a new set of choppers, anyway? And vision? They’re old, of course they can’t see well.

Do you know who made out like bandits. Billionaires, that’s who. Dropped like a hot potato was the “Billionaires Income Tax” which would have “applied to roughly 700 taxpayers and raise hundreds of billions of dollars, ensuring the wealthiest people in the country pay their fair share toward historic investments in child care, paid leave, and addressing the climate crisis. Only taxpayers with more than $100 million in annual income or more than $1 billion in assets for three consecutive years would be covered by the proposal.” Unbelievable.
 
To be fair, also cut from the bill was paid family and medical leave. Initially, 12 weeks were floated, but the proposal has now been entirely cut. And two free years of community college. The last, free college, probably destroys forever any hope of any free higher education. What a waste of potential talent.

For those of you who think that spending and giving away all that stuff for free would make us a welfare state and bankrupt us, you’re wrong. What it would do is make us a healthier, smarter and stronger nation.
 
At one time, we had men that saw way beyond of what was and saw what could be. Money was not an issue. Today, our legislators can’t see any further than their convoluted vision of society, where they honestly believe rich people will do the right thing and voluntarily share their wealth with the rest of us. They also believe old people are just a thorn in the side of taxpayers who, if they didn’t have to “support” us in our old age, they would have much more money to pay their own way through college and buy their own health insurance. They also think they will never get old. Or, if they do, they think they will be rich enough to spend their “golden years” in the lap of luxury. To me, that’s a special kind of dumb……………….

[1] $1,750,000,000,000




Medicare and Dental Coverage:
 A Closer Look


Dental benefits are not generally covered by Medicare, except under limited circumstances, and many people on Medicare do not have any dental coverage at all. Some Medicare beneficiaries have access to dental coverage through other sources, such as Medicare Advantage plans, but the scope of dental benefits, when covered, varies widely and is often quite limited, which can result in high out-of-pocket costs among those with serious dental needs or unmet need.

Policymakers are now discussing options to make dental care more affordable by broadening dental coverage for people on Medicare. President Biden’s FY 2022 budget request includes as part of the President’s healthcare agenda “improving access to dental, hearing, and vision coverage in Medicare.” Senate Democrats recently announced an agreement to include Medicare   expansions, including dental, vision, and hearing, as part of the budget reconciliation package, though details of the agreement have not yet been released. In 2019, the House of Representatives passed the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act (H.R.3) that would add a dental benefit to Medicare Part B, along with a vision and hearing benefit, in addition to provisions to reduce prescription drug costs. Earlier this year, Representative Doggett, joined by 76 members of the House of Representatives, introduced the Medicare Dental, Vision, and Hearing Benefit Act (H.R. 4311) which would cover these benefits under Medicare Part B.


_____________________________________


Medicaid issues, not Medicare's,
get fixes in Biden budget
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Medicaid issues are turning up as winners in President Joe Biden’s social agenda framework even as divisions force Democrats to hit pause on far-reaching improvements to Medicare.



The budget blueprint Biden released Thursday would fulfill a campaign promise to help poor people locked out of Medicaid expansion across the South due to partisan battles, and it would provide low-income seniors and disabled people with more options to stay out of nursing homes by getting support in their own homes. It also calls for 12 months of Medicaid coverage after childbirth for low-income mothers, seen as a major step to address national shortcomings in maternal health that fall disproportionately on Black women.


But with Medicare, Democrats were unable to reach consensus on prescription drug price negotiations. Polls show broad bipartisan support for authorizing Medicare to negotiate lower prices, yet a handful of Democratic lawmakers—enough to block the bill—echo pharmaceutical industry arguments that it would dampen investment that drives innovation. Advocacy groups are voicing outrage over the omission, with AARP calling it “a monumental mistake.”


(See Op-Ed above)

__________________________________________________________

Older adults with declining physical function
 at greater risk of dying


Older adults in their 70s who maintain their physical ability to accomplish everyday activities like walking, standing up from a chair, bathing, and dressing may have a lower risk of dying than those with declining physical function, according to an NIA-supported study. The findings, which were published recently in the British Medical Journal, suggest that middle-aged adults in their 50s and 60s may be able to reduce their risk of dying in early older adulthood by working to maintain their physical function.Older adult being helped up from a sitting to a standing position by a caregiver.



In previous studies, researchers observed that there may be a link between physical function decline in older adulthood and increased risk of death. For this study, researchers at the University of Paris, INSERM, and the University College London examined physical function over many years among nearly 6,200 research participants enrolled in Whitehall II, a long-term study of British civil servants supported in part by NIA. The research team evaluated physical function through objective measures of walking speed, hand grip strength, and ability to stand up from sitting on a chair. All participants were also asked to describe their ability to perform everyday tasks such as bathing and cooking.

The research team analyzed all deaths from any reason that occurred by October 2019. Between the first measure in 2007−2009 and October 2019, 654 participants died at an average age of about 77. Those who died tended to have worse physical function measures, especially slower walking speed, than those who were still alive in October 2019.


________________________________________


When Conservatorship Goes Terribly Wrong
My family's troubling experience with the man
 appointed to manage my mother's life


When people ask me about the circumstances surrounding the painful story of my mother's probate conservatorship — where the man appointed by a judge to manage my mother's finances and daily life inflicted financial and mental abuse on her — there's one question I always encounter: How did this happen to your family?



A simple answer: it can happen to anyone.


Roughly 1.5 million Americans are under guardianship or conservatorship, most of them over 65. Although many conservators and guardians do excellent work, some are notorious. One AARP article said: "Activists charge that in some cases, unscrupulous professional guardians have turned legally sanctioned exploitation into a cottage industry, abetted by greedy attorneys and pliable judges."


______________________________________

Survey Shows COVID-19 Toll
on Senior Mental Health


From the beginning, it was clear that seniors’ lives would be turned upside down as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, but Humana’s survey of over 1,000 seniors reveal the severe toll the pandemic has taken on senior mental health and social health.



“Health plans should take particular notice, since it is critical to understand all the evolving needs of seniors – health, social and behavioral – as the industry increasingly moves toward models of ‘whole health’ senior care and coverage,” said Kathy Driscoll, senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Humana.

The survey reached 1,003 Americans ages 64 and older, nationwide. Kelton Global fielded the survey from September 14 to September 21, 2021.


______________________________________


Which Prescriptions Send Older Adults to the Hospital?
By Cheryl Weinstock


In a recent study of emergency room visits, diabetes medications and anticoagulants, which help prevent blood clots, were found to be the leading prescription medications sending older people to the emergency room with problems like adverse side effects or unintentional drug interactions.



“Certain medications may have been safer to use when you were younger, but now that you are older, these medications can be potentially more dangerous and cause side effects,” explains Ula Hwang, M.D., professor and vice chair for research in the department of emergency medicine at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.


That’s because older adults are typically on more medications than younger patients and because medications can interact in harmful ways. Older adults also metabolize medications more slowly and may be more sensitive to them than younger people, she says.





6 ways to delete yourself from the internet:
Getting off the grid isn't as easy as it seems

By Eric Franklin

Finally ready to get off the grid? It's not quite as simple as it should be. Josh Miller/CNET


If you're reading this, it's highly likely your personal information is available to the public. And by "public" I mean everyone everywhere. So, how can deleting yourself from the internet stop companies from getting ahold of your info? Short answer: It can't. Unfortunately, you can never
completely remove yourself from the internet, but there are ways to minimize your digital footprint, which would lower the chances of your personal data getting out there. Here are some ways to do that. We'll update these tips periodically.

Be forewarned, however: Removing your information from the internet, as I've outlined below, could adversely affect your ability to communicate with potential employers.








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http://wcenterblog.yolasite.com/cartoon-gallery.php






NEXT NEW BLOG TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2. 2021





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Unfortunately, Discus (the comments provider I use) is giving me trouble. Very long loading times and the inability to delete old comments is slowing down my ability to edit this blog. Therefore, it’s back to the drawing board and another comment box beta-test……..ed.