Good Day. It’s Saturday, October 23, 2021




OCTOBER 23, 2021





The week began with such promise. We were very close to ending round two of our latest DOH mandated COVID-19 infection control protocol lockdown insult. It should have ended yesterday. Sadly, because a third resident tested positive, the clock was turned back, leaving us to endure another 14 days of insanity. However, as insane the DOH policy may be on one hand, they have shown some common sense by administering our 3rd, or “Booster” shot of the Pfizer vaccine on Thursday. Now, all of our nearly 200 residents are 100% vaccinated. That, along with the other cautionary procedures (mask wearing, hand sanitizing and social distancing) makes us the best protected group of people in the Nation. More of what I call, “The ALF Paradox.”


On one hand, they treat you like an inmate who needs to be constantly controlled. While their interest in your safety and well-being is beyond reproach. I can say, without question, I have never felt so safe in all my life. Too bad these arbitrary and capricious decisions feel as though I am in an alternate dimension where everyone is bi-polar. It keeps you on your toes, though.
 
Also on my agenda this week was a double-dose of physical therapy, which left me drained, but in a good way. Lots of muscles and tendons getting a workout. I’m glad I elected to do this, despite the pain. Now, if they could only do something about the food…………

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Why even fully vaccinated older people
 are at high risk for severe COVID-19

By Amy McKeever

Many factors weaken the aging immune system. But vaccines—and booster doses—do offer protection from hospitalization and death.



Mounting data suggest that older people are at higher risk of severe disease from a breakthrough infection of COVID-19—and scientists say that should come as no surprise. After all, older age brackets have been disproportionately at risk throughout the pandemic, and that continues to be true even once someone is fully vaccinated.

Concerns about breakthrough infections bubbled up again this week when news broke on October 18 that former Secretary of State Colin Powell had died after contracting COVID-19. Powell was 84, but his cause of death was more complex: The former statesman suffered from multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells. People with this form of cancer tend not to respond well to vaccines.


_______________________

Anti-aging drug acts as a "smart bomb"
 to take out dysfunctional cells

By Nick Lavars

Back in 2015 we saw a new class of drugs emerge with huge potential when it comes to the aging process and how it might be slowed. Scientists working to improve the potency and safety of these so-called senolytic drugs have made a significant discovery, pioneering an antibody treatment that closes in on the target cells with a new level of precision, while leaving healthy cells unharmed.



The massive potential of senolytics lies in their ability to take aim at what are known as senescent cells. These are cells that have lost their ability to divide and instead accumulate in the body and accelerate the aging process. While this is a natural part of growing older, scientists have made some exciting inroads around how these cells can be cleared from the body with purpose-made drugs.


Senolytic drugs have been shown to rejuvenate old cells in rodents and also increase their lifespan, while promising advances have also been made in using them to improve healthspan, or the amount of our lives we spend healthy. Just last month we looked at an exciting example of this, in which scientists demonstrated how senolytic drugs can remove senescent cells in aging rodent spines and create space for healthy new cells to flourish, raising the prospect of new treatment for chronic back pain in humans.


___________________

The FDA wants you to be able to buy
 a hearing aid without a prescription

By Bill Chappell

The Food and Drug Administration is moving to approve over-the-counter hearing aids in a change that lawmakers and advocates have long called for. Here, a man displays his hearing aid before taking part in a meeting. Keith Bedford/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption



People with mild or moderate hearing loss could soon be able to buy hearing aids without a medical exam or special fitting, under a new rule being proposed by the Food and Drug Administration. The agency says 37.5 million American adults have difficulty hearing.


"Today's move by FDA takes us one step closer to the goal of making hearing aids more accessible and affordable for the tens of millions of people who experience mild to moderate hearing loss," Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said as he announced the proposed rule on Tuesday.


____________________


Indecision:
Sinking ships and endangering lives

By Kimberly Marselas

Standing along the banks of the Potomac River where she’d come for a convention last week, a skilled nursing provider dramatically recounted her efforts to stay afloat back home in the Midwest.



Stricken by major staffing woes (complicated by the region’s overwhelming vaccine hesitancy), her company had been forced to close a facility that had long served seniors and, more recently, taken on a mission to serve residents with mental illness.


The building had a storied past, but post-COVID economic woes had written its final chapter.


____________________

Death and the Family Hunt for Hidden Assets
By Barbara Bates Sedoric


Where are you hiding assets? Are they stored away in a locked trunk in your attic? Are they located in boxes stacked on the back wall of your moldy basement? Or did you pile your valuable art and antiques in an off–site storage unit located two towns over from your house? Death and Family Hunt for Hidden Assets


Do you have several passbook bank accounts from various banks scattered in the four towns you once lived in or three 401K Plans from prior employment? Have you hidden jewelry in tattered shoeboxes in the back of a third floor closet or in the zippered interior of an old pocketbook?


More importantly, does anyone know about your hidden treasures?  Does anyone – a family member, a close friend, or your trusted advisor – actually know what you have and where you have painstakingly placed valuable assets hidden from view?







Teletherapy often leaves out older people.
Here’s how a Washington researcher is trying to help them connect

Read more  >>  https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/mental-health/teletherapy-often-leaves-out-older-people-heres-how-washington-researchers-are-trying-to-change-that/
============================================
Daily phthalate exposure may lead to roughly
100,000 premature deaths among older Americans

============================================
Alzheimer’s villages could be the answer
 to the rising cases—and cost—of dementia

By Sophie Mellor
============================================
Many at-risk older adults aren’t checking
 blood pressure at home,
 or being encouraged to do so

By Kara Gavin
============================================
Survey: 7 In 10 Seniors Worried About Inflation’
Impact On Retirement Savings

By Ben Zeisloft
===========================================
Another big lie – 'they want to steal your retirement'
 gains traction in lead-up to 2022

By Terry Smith
===========================================
One in Four U.S. Adults Have Arthritis
By Pat Anson
===========================================
When Your Health Insurer
 Won't Pay a Claim

==========================================
Nearly 95 percent of older adults
 take prescriptions that increase their risk of falling

By Kristen Dalli
==========================================
Seniors decry ageism in health care settings
By Judith Graham
==========================================
We Are Being Robbed Blind by Big Pharma
==========================================
Clinical Trial to Examine How Virtual Reality
 Can Help Older Adults and Their Families

==========================================
Self-Defense for Seniors:
 Must-Know Info About How to Protect Yourself

===========================================
Over 70% of Seniors Say
 Their Home is Their Most Valuable Asset

===========================================
What are the Best and Worst States
 for Workers 65 and Over?

By Vance Cariaga
===========================================
Biden caregiving plan:
How Medicaid might be used
 to boost in-home care

===========================================
Thanks but no:
 UK queen turns down 'Oldie of the Year' title

===========================================
5 Ways to Feel Younger in Retirement



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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, OCTOBER 25. 2021





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LOCKDOWN ENDS IN APPROX



Good Day. It’s Thursday, October 21, 2021





OCTOBER 21, 2021


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Over 70% of Seniors Say
 Their Home is Their Most Valuable Asset


For older Americans, their home is as much an investment as it is a place to live. New data from American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation's leader in home equity solutions, shows that seniors' homes not only have a great deal of monetary worth, but also significant sentimental value. To gain a deeper understanding of exactly how meaningful home is to America's seniors, AAG conducted the Importance of Home Survey with over 1,500 participants ages 60-75.



"Buying a home is one of the largest purchases someone can make, and for many seniors, that purchase has turned into an investment," said AAG Chief Marketing Officer Martin Lenoir. "Our data shows that older Americans are well aware of what their homes are worth and are looking to utilize the equity they have gained, which is a big reason why we're seeing so many seniors interested in reverse mortgages. Homes not only embody the journey that seniors have lived, they also represent a possible retirement strategy for the future."


_________________________________

What are the Best and Worst States
 for Workers 65 and Over?

By Vance Cariaga

Americans 65 and older are earning paychecks in record numbers these days, with 10.6 million currently in the workforce, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That number is expected to reach 16 million by 2030, with the number of workers 75 and older projected to nearly double between now and then, and the number of workers 65 and older expected to increase by about 42%.



With so many older folks delaying their retirement plans — either because they like working, are taking advantage of remote work due to COVID-19, or simply need the money — many might wonder which parts of the U.S. are best and worst for older employees.


The Seniorly Research Center decided to find out. To arrive at an answer, it compared data from the Census Bureau, Tax Foundation and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for each state across five categories: labor force participation for older adults, income, taxes, healthcare and life expectancy.


_______________________________


Biden caregiving plan:
How Medicaid might be used

 to boost in-home care


Among the possible items to be included in President Joe Biden's  caregiving plan, part of a multi-trillion dollar social spending plan under consideration in Congress, is an expansion of Medicaid eligibility and funding to improve states' in-home care services. USA Today Network reporters Madeleine O'Neill and David Robinson take a closer look at the possible impact of this step.



Much of the Biden administration’s $400 billion plan for improving in-home care services hinges on states taking advantage of reforms to Medicaid, the government health program for low-income and disabled Americans.


Central to the effort are proposals to offer added federal funds to states as an incentive to fill gaps in current in-home care services, which are primarily offered through a patchwork of state-run programs.


____________________________


Thanks but no:
 UK queen turns down 'Oldie of the Year' title



Queen Elizabeth II is Britain’s longest-lived and longest-reigning monarch. But don’t call her an oldie.

The 95-year-old queen has politely declined the honor of being named “Oldie of the Year” by a British magazine, saying she does not meet “the relevant criteria.”


 
The Oldie magazine on Tuesday published the queen’s response to its suggestion that she follow in the footsteps of former recipients, including former Prime Minister John Major, actor Olivia de Havilland and artist David Hockney.



 


____________________________

5 Ways to Feel Younger in Retirement


This semi-retired psychologist says the key is to avoid 'a plunge into the abyss of insignificance'

How can you feel younger in your retirement years? This is a big question and one I am just starting to get a handle on, I think.


I am almost 67, quite healthy and am fortunate enough to not have serious financial worries. Both my wife and I are psychologists and still working about one to two days per week — just enough so we don't have to dip into our savings. We are lucky to have flexible careers that we still love doing.











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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, October 20, 2021













I had written an entirely different post for today.

I was about to inform you that so far, as of Wednesday October 19, we only had one resident test positive since we began our most recent lockdown on October 7 and therefore would look forward to regaining our regular activities (including communal dining) by Friday of this week. But alas. Just as I finished writing that post, a memo from our administrator appeared in my mailbox. It said simply, two more residents had tested positive for the virus, making 3 since the lockdown. And, according to DOH rules, we have to extend the restrictions for an additional 14 days. That pushes our “release” date to approximately Nov. 4. Once again, we residents are required to bear the brunt of someone else’s mistake..............


OCTOBER 20, 2021


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Seniors decry ageism in health care settings
By Judith Graham

Joanne Whitney, 84, a retired associate clinical professor of pharmacy at the University of California-San Francisco, often feels devalued when interacting with health care providers.



There was the time several years ago when she told an emergency room doctor that the antibiotic he wanted to prescribe wouldn't counteract the kind of urinary tract infection she had.


He wouldn't listen, even when she mentioned her professional credentials. She asked to see someone else, to no avail. "I was ignored and finally I gave up," said Whitney, who has survived lung cancer and cancer of the urethra and depends on a special catheter to drain urine from her bladder. (An outpatient renal service later changed the prescription.)


_______________________________

We Are Being Robbed Blind by Big Pharma


Molnupiravir is the new pill that's been all over the news recently because it can cut hospitalizations and deaths of unvaccinated Covid-infected people by as much as half and doesn't require folks to go to the hospital or an infusion center, like the monoclonal antibody remdesivir. Just take a pill every day for five days and you're good.



It was originally developed by Emory University to treat horses infected with Venezuelan equine encephalitis with a $10 million grant from the Department of Defense and $19 million from the National Institutes of Health. In other words, its invention was paid for with your tax dollars.

Emory University passed along the patent on molnupiravir to a small company, Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, which in turn passed it along to the pharmaceutical giant Merck. Manufacturing cost for molnupiravir, according to a report from researchers with the Harvard School of Public Health, is around $17.74 for a 5-day course of treatment. Merck just signed a contract with the federal government to sell 1.7 million treatment courses for the government to distribute to infected people for … wait for it … $712.00 each.


_________________________________


Clinical Trial to Examine How Virtual Reality
 Can Help Older Adults and Their Families



COVID-19 life has taken a toll on us all, but it’s hit older adults particularly hard. Separated from family and friends, and less able to travel than before, many seniors have become lonely and depressed.



The pandemic struck just as UC Santa Barbara professors Tamara Afifi and Nancy Collins were conducting a pilot study to determine whether virtual reality (VR) experiences could improve quality of life for seniors and their adult children.


After conducting a phase I pilot study at Maravilla, a senior living community in Santa Barbara, the team has now received $2 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to begin a two-year clinical trial.


_________________________________


Self-Defense for Seniors:
 Must-Know Info About How to Protect Yourself



Everyone deserves to feel secure. That's why self-defense for seniors is such an important topic. As people age, their bodies tend to get slower and weaker, which can make them vulnerable to attacks by criminals. Fortunately, there are a variety of good tactics that older adults can learn in order to protect themselves.



The sad reality is that some people do prey on seniors. A U.S. Department of Justice report noted that between 2003 and 2013, 93 percent of all crimes against people over age 65 were property crimes such as burglary and theft. And even though seniors and the elderly experience lower rates of violent crime than those in other age groups, the report showed that over the same time period, the rate of violent crime against people over 65 increased by 27 percent.


This article will help you understand different types of self-defense training that are available (including martial arts and cane self-defense) and how such training can benefit your health and well-being. You'll learn about steps you can take to avoid becoming a target and discover basic techniques for defending yourself if you do end up in a dangerous situation. You'll also read about important factors to consider before turning to a firearm for your defense.









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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21. 2021





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LOCKDOWN ENDS IN APPROX



Good Day, It’s Tuesday, October 19, 2021






OCTOBER 19, 2021


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Getting older doesn’t have to be scary.
Things to consider as you age
Experts urge people to think now about
 the type of care they want in the future

By EMILY DERUY


As we age, it’s not uncommon to experience physical and mental changes that make day-to-day life more challenging. Geriatricians and other experts say it’s important to plan ahead for our older years.

That means thinking about the type of care we might want and who will help us make medical decisions.



Not only does contemplating the future now result in fewer surprises later, it lets us communicate our wishes ahead of time with the closest people in our lives.


“We all have blinders on about what happens to us if we get frail,” said UCSF geriatrician Anna Chodos. “For most of us it’s not if, but when.”

Here are things to consider.


___________________________________

Baby boomers are snatching houses
out of the hands of millennials


It's boomers who are winning, according to a Zillow report released this week. It found that so many boomers are active in the housing market that it's become more difficult for millennials to buy a home.


Americans 60 years old and older have been more active in the housing market in the past decade than people in the same age group 10 years earlier. The share of homebuyers in this cohort grew by 47% from 2009 to 2019. Meanwhile, the share of younger buyers ages 18 to 39 in the past decade has shrunk by 13% in the same time frame.


This is all happening as millennials, now America's largest generation, age into their peak homebuying years. It's largely because boomers are taking advantage of an appreciating housing market. US home values had already increased by 31.2% from 2009 to 2019, according to Zillow, and the pandemic's hot housing demand only jacked up values even further.


________________________________


Seniors: Your Life Insurance Could Be a Source of Income
What to consider before letting your life insurance policy lapse.

By Anthony Cirillo

COVID-19 has increased everyone’s anxiety, and people of all ages now face questions about their own mortality and end of life. Estate planning lawyers are experiencing a boom in business, and people are creating advance directives. All of this contingency planning is a way to reduce anxiety while planning for the unknown. I have always believed planning in advance for your aging – physically, financially and emotionally – is key to quality aging, no matter what.



One particular area that's often overlooked (maybe because it's confusing) is life insurance. The pandemic has caused many people to re-evaluate their financial resources and life insurance policies. Ever since Benjamin Franklin helped start the first life insurance company in the U.S. in 1759, life insurance has been a key part of our lives and financial planning. Today, the U.S. is the leading life insurance premium-writing country in the world, with more than 290 million life insurance policies.


But 500,000 seniors a year will “lapse” their life insurance policies, meaning they stop making the premium payments on them and let them go. They walk away with very little or nothing. I spoke with Lisa Rehburg of Rehburg Life Insurance Settlements to find out why: “The reason this happens is that their policy is no longer wanted, needed or affordable, and they do not know there is another option," she says. "Many clients think they only have three options: pay the premium, lapse the policy or surrender the policy. The good news is, there is another option: a life insurance settlement.”


________________________________


Elder Financial Exploitation:
 Warning Signs, Prevention and Reporting

By Marguerita Cheng


Financial exploitation in the elder population has been on the rise, with financial institutions reporting quadruple the number of such incidences from 2013 to 2017, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB.



No matter how big or small the deception, it can leave older adults and their families financially and emotionally devastated.


What can you do to protect your loved ones? It starts by understanding elder financial abuse, learning how to spot red flags, putting preventive measures in place and knowing how to report suspicious activity.




_________________________________


Investing in Real Estate for Senior Citizens
 

Senior citizens (people over the age of 65) currently make up 16% of the population in America according to the US Census Bureau.  That’s a revealing statistic in terms of your potential real estate investment success.  Why? Because if you consider there are over 70 million seniors making decisions about living arrangements – that represents a lot of opportunities for real estate investors and developers. So, if you’re thinking about investing in property catered to this giant demographic, here are a few things to consider when researching real estate opportunities for seniors.

Real Estate Investing With Senior Citizens in Mind



If you want to expand your real estate portfolio, investing in senior housing developments might be a lucrative way to go.  The Baby Boomer segment of the US population is growing each year. In fact, according to census.gov, more than 20% of the US population will be residents over the age of 65 by the year 2030.  So if you think about it, this demographic could be incredibly profitable and expansive over the next decade.


That said, there are special considerations when investing in senior housing.  For instance, keen attention must be paid to the structure in order to accommodate senior needs.  So while you may find a smashing deal on housing development, be prepared to make additional investments such as installing wheelchair ramps, adequate hand railing, non-slip flooring, etc.









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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, October 18, 2021











To paraphrase Billy Bob Thornton’s character in the movie ‘Slingblade’, “some call it a habit, some call it a routine. I like to call it a routine.” Activities you do almost every day at the same time and in the same manner. It’s what gets you upset when something changes. In an extreme case, some would say it’s OCD (Obsessive Compulsion Disorder) like having to wash your hands 10 times before you can leave the house. For most of us, it’s just what makes everything seem normal. For us oldsters, normalcy means comfort and solace.

From 2009 to 2012, the time I spent in and out of hospitals and nursing homes, my life was turned upside down. Nothing was normal. The endless tests, the painful physical therapy, the medications and procedures. My life certainly was not my own. There was no cohesiveness. Nothing I could depend on being the same. I strongly believe the lack of the familiar is as much a hindrance to recovery from an illness as any of the treatments they do to you. The older you get, the fewer surprises the better. I want to know what’s the next day will bring, and it better not differ too much from the day before. 
 
“Okay, but where’s my sense of adventure”, you ask. “Don’t you get bored with doing the same thing every day?” To that I say, ” You are looking at life from the perspective of younger people who have no sense of their own mortality.” But I do. And as that day when all existence ends, for me, looms closer and closer, all I want now is safety and security and the hell with adventure.
 
I like to know where my next meal is coming from, and at what time I can expect to eat it. I enjoy knowing my rent will get paid on time and I will receive my medication when I need it. I even like knowing I can take a shower, shave and do all my other ablutions at the same time every day. I’m comfortable with that. And I need it as much as the air I breathe.

This does not mean I cannot change. I can, and I have. Take the other day for instance.
 
My usual routine, after I awake, log on to my laptop and publish this blog, is to shower, shave and brush my teeth. I have done this every day for the last 8 years. And have become so efficient at carrying on this system I barely realize I’m doing it. Until something upsets the pace, that is.
 
After showing, shaving and drying off, I grab my toothbrush, reach for the tube of toothpaste I keep in a cup next to my sink, and begin squeezing a dollop on to my brush. Yesterday, however, as I
reached for the tube of Colgate’s Total, it was not there. I forgot the last tube was fully spent, and I had forgotten to replace it. No problem. I’ll just go to the drawer where I keep all of my “supplies” and get another one. But alas. There was no other tube. I ran out. Something I never do. Did I panic? No, I improvised. I made a paste of baking soda and mouthwash and used that instead. Of course, I quickly went to Amazon and ordered my usual supply of toothpaste, and hoped it would arrive the next day. Was I happy about the kink in my groove? No, but I’ll live. 

My only regret is, it took so much of my time to make up for my error. And at my age, time is the one commodity I’m in short supply of……………………….
 
 
 

OCTOBER 18, 2021


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Survey: 7 In 10 Seniors Worried About Inflation’
Impact On Retirement Savings

 By Ben Zeisloft


As high inflation continues to affect the U.S. economy, senior citizens are concerned that the high price levels will erode their retirement savings.



Global Atlantic Financial Group — a life insurance and annuity company — surveyed over 1,000 investors between the ages of 59 to 75 with more than $250,000 in assets. They found that 71% of respondents indicated that they believe rising inflation will negatively impact their retirement savings and 46% of those with fixed income investments worry that low interest rates will impact their retirement income.


“Those on the cusp of retirement are paying close attention to economic issues such as inflation and low interest rates, and they recognize that it might be a good time to revisit their retirement strategies,” Global Atlantic executive Paula Nelson said in a press release.


____________________________

Another big lie – 'they want to steal your retirement'
 gains traction in lead-up to 2022

By Terry Smith

Upon exposure to harsh political attack ads or campaigns that make outrageous, easily debunked claims, in the old days I'd react with skepticism: “Nobody will believe that crap."



The classic First Amendment ideal would come to mind – that the searing light of truth is the best way to expose falsehoods and lies in the political sphere.


Unfortunately, that no longer works. Conventional news media fragmentation and the rise of social media have so diffused the beacon of truth that it never reaches a lot of people.


______________________________

One in Four U.S. Adults Have Arthritis
By Pat Anson

Nearly one in four American adults --- 58.5 million people – report having arthritis, according to a new study by the CDC that highlights both the aging of the U.S. population and the challenges that poses for the nation’s healthcare system.



Arthritis is a disease that causes joint pain and stiffness, which typically worsen with age, and is the leading cause of adult disability. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.


Researchers found that over half of Americans aged 65 and older have arthritis (50.4%); along with adults who are disabled or unable to work (52.3%); and adults who rate their health as either fair or poor (51.2%).


______________________________

When Your Health Insurer
 Won't Pay a Claim


When Jeannine Cain's 20-year-old son complained to her about feeling fatigued, having a headache and a stiff neck, she told him to see a doctor. She worried he might have spinal meningitis. However, it was March 2020, and the U.S. had gone into lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus. So, getting a doctor's appointment was a challenge.



Her son went, instead, to an urgent care clinic, but was turned away because it wasn't equipped to diagnose or treat meningitis. His next stop was the emergency room, where his blood was drawn and a spinal tap was performed. Fortunately, he didn't have meningitis. The diagnosis was "other viral syndrome," Cain said.


If you or your parents are ever hit with a surprise medical bill the insurer refuses to pay, you don't have to take "No" for an answer.


_______________________________

Nearly 95 percent of older adults
 take prescriptions that increase their risk of falling

By Kristen Dalli

A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Buffalo explored how prescription drugs may pose a health risk to older consumers.


Their work revealed that nearly 95 percent of older adults are taking prescription drugs that increase their risk of falling. This is concerning because falls for older consumers can lead to more serious health complications and increase the risk of death.



“Our study indicates two trends increasing concurrently at a population level that should be examined at the individual level,” said researcher Amy Shaver. “Our hope is that it will start more conversations on health care teams about the pros and cons of medications prescribed for vulnerable populations.”










23 Organizations Dedicated to the Needs of Seniors

Organizing the needs and finances for our loved ones, family members, or our own retirement can be overwhelming. The good news is that there are many helpful organizations specializing in senior issues.



Below is a list of 23 organizations dedicated to the needs of seniors — and it’s just the beginning. While many of these national organizations can refer you to agencies and businesses in your local community, you may also find useful information by searching “senior centers” for your city or town online, or in the telephone book.










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GOOD DAY
It’s Sunday, October 17, 2021







One week down. One week to go


One full week of our mandated incarceration has gone by and we appear none the worse for wear, I guess.
 
We are a hardy lot of old folks here at the Asylum and have an amazing ability to weather whatever the bureaucracy throws at us. No matter if it’s some dopey rule against having an additional communal microwave oven for our annex, or having a simple Mr. Coffee maker in our rooms, we residents endure. And now, when they have imposed their “COVER OUR ASSES” lockdown protocols again, we don’t get pissed off and complain. This, although it was THEM who put us in this position in the first place by allowing outings to places where the public is not as controlled as us, and subsequently coming in contact with, and contracting the virus.



As things stand now, no new cases of the virus have been reported among the staff or residents. With any luck, we will see the end to this recent insult to our freedom next Thursday or Friday, none the worse for wear. However, the question remains. “If this is not our fault, why are we being punished?”……………………..


 
October 17, 2021

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Teletherapy often leaves out older people.
Here’s how a Washington researcher
is trying to help them connect


The pandemic made telehealth — remote health care, usually over a video application — ubiquitous in Washington.



But when Veterans Affairs psychiatrist Dr. Debby Tsuang began offering telehealth appointments to her patients, mostly older adults at high risk for complications from COVID-19, many were reluctant to log on to a computer or tablet to set up a video meeting. Most preferred a traditional phone call to discuss their mental health needs.  

“In particular, older adults of color did not have access to such devices” and they “experienced a digital divide that further exacerbated health disparities,” Tsuang said.


________________________________________


Daily phthalate exposure may lead to roughly
100,000 premature deaths among older Americans



Daily exposure to chemicals called phthalates, which are used in the manufacture of plastic food containers and many cosmetics, may lead to roughly 100,000 premature deaths among older Americans each year, a new study shows. The resulting annual economic burden is between $40 billion and $47 billion, a value more than quadruple that of previous estimates.



For decades, phthalates have been shown to pose a potential danger to human health because the chemicals can interfere with the function of hormones, which are signaling compounds made in glands that circulate to influence processes throughout the body, experts say. Exposure is believed to occur through buildup of these toxins as consumer products break down and are ingested, with exposure linked to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation of more than 5,000 adults between the ages of 55 and 64 showed that those with the highest concentrations of phthalates in their urine were more likely to die of heart disease than those with lesser exposure.


________________________________________


Alzheimer’s villages could be the answer
 to the rising cases—and cost—of dementia

By Sophie Mellor


For young people, COVID lockdowns meant missed graduations, empty college parties, and no much-needed getaways. For the elderly, the consequences were much more pernicious: physical inactivity, long days of mental monotony—and an increased threat of Alzheimer’s disease.



Deaths from dementia and Alzheimer’s in the U.S. increased by 16% since the start of pandemic, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, a trend that happened to coincide with recent blockbuster dementia-themed movies such as The Father and Supernova. That trend is expected to worsen long after COVID is under control as the population ages. The number of people living with dementia is expected to increase by 40% between 2019 and 2030, to around 78 million, according to the World Health Organization, with the overall cost increasing almost a third over the same period, to $1.7 trillion.


But a small village in Dax, France, is working to find a better way to handle the increasing caseload. In one of the first research projects of its kind, the small town houses around 110 people with early- to late-stage Alzheimer’s who are free to roam and visit the village’s supermarket, hairdresser, restaurant, café, library, and music hall. With a daily cost of €65 ($75), the program aims to allow people to exist with greater autonomy, purpose, and freedom without facing immediate financial hardship. “If it is not for everyone, it doesn’t work,” said Mathilde Charon-Burnel, a spokesperson for the experiment.


________________________________________


Many at-risk older adults aren’t checking
 blood pressure at home,
 or being encouraged to do so

By Kara Gavin


Experts see more opportunity to increase home blood pressure monitoring and reporting among people with a range of chronic conditions affected by hypertension



More than half of adults between the ages of 50 and 80 have a health condition that puts them at high risk of major health emergencies if they don’t keep their blood pressure under control. But a new poll finds less than half of people in this group regularly check their blood pressure at home or in other places outside the health care system.


Even among people with such health conditions who said their health providers encouraged them to check their blood pressure regularly, only about two-thirds actually did.







Science explains the meaning behind
 the most common recurring dreams

By Tore Nielsen and Claudia Picard-Deland


Having the same dream, again and again, is a well-known phenomenon — nearly two-thirds of the population report having recurring dreams. Being chased, finding yourself naked in a public place or in the middle of a natural disaster, losing your teeth, or forgetting to go to class for an entire semester are typical recurring scenarios in these dreams.



But where does the phenomenon come from? The science of dreams shows that recurring dreams may reflect unresolved conflicts in the dreamer’s life.


Recurring dreams often occur during times of stress, or over long periods of time, sometimes several years or even a lifetime. Not only do these dreams have the same themes, but they can also repeat the same narrative night after night.






Risk of dementia 73% higher for people
 with these symptoms in early adulthood

By Danielle Echeverria
Read more  >>  https://www.sfchronicle.com/health/article/Depression-in-young-adults-could-raise-dementia-16494612.php
___________________________________________________
Student Loan Strategies for Seniors and Retirees
By Becca Craig, CFP
Read more  >>  https://www.thestreet.com/retirement-daily/planning-living-retirement/student-loan-strategies-for-seniors-and-retirees
___________________________________________________
Take These Steps to Manage Foot Pain
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/foot-pain-management/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=decfec6cbf-Tuesday_Newsletter_10_05_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-decfec6cbf-165407981&mc_cid=decfec6cbf&mc_eid=94767a79b9
___________________________________________________
Opinion: The other Social Security crisis —
 that almost no one is talking about

By Paul Brandus
Read more  >>  https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-the-elderly-disabled-and-poor-dont-get-any-attention-from-congress-11633470635
____________________________________________________
Do I Have To Pay For My Parent’s Care?
Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/do-i-have-to-pay-for-my-parent-s-care-1264426/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
____________________________________________________
Using internet in retirement
boosts cognitive function

Read more  >>  https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/news/using-internet-in-retirement-boosts-cognitive-function
____________________________________________________
Depression and anxiety declined in the first half of 2021
but remained high, the C.D.C. reports.

By BENJAMIN MUELLER
Read more  >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/05/health/covid-depression-anxiety.html?utm_source=pocket_mylist
____________________________________________________
Staying active in winter
poses challenges for seniors

By ALEX KRUTCHIK
____________________________________________________
2 Ways to Give Loved Ones Access to Your Bank Accounts After You Die
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/bank-accounts-access/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=825e417119-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_09_30&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-825e417119-165407981&mc_cid=825e417119&mc_eid=94767a79b9
_____________________________________________________
Is Social Security Failing Our Nation's Seniors?
By Sean Williams
Read more >> https://www.fool.com/investing/2021/10/10/is-social-security-failing-our-nations-seniors/
______________________________________________________
Ban on negotiating Medicare
 drug prices under pressure

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Read more  >>  https://apnews.com/article/lifestyle-business-congress-health-care-reform-medicare-756e3255a1cb4ab8c813151aec19b60c
______________________________________________________
Latest senior living stats reason to be ‘cautiously optimistic’
 about comeback from pandemic

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/latest-senior-living-stats-reason-to-be-cautiously-optimistic-about-comeback-from-pandemic/
______________________________________________________
4th stimulus check? Here's who's proposing it
 and why not everyone will get it

By  Travis Pittman
______________________________________________________
Trash Talk About Frayed Fashion:
Donating Unwanted Clothing and Textiles

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/donate-unwanted-clothing/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=decfec6cbf-Tuesday_Newsletter_10_05_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-decfec6cbf-165407981&mc_cid=decfec6cbf&mc_eid=94767a79b9
_____________________________________________________
It’s Medicare Open Enrollment Time:
 Is Your Plan Still Working for You?

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/it-s-medicare-open-enrollment-time-is-7097755/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
_____________________________________________________
Health study reveals seniors
are ahead in fighting the pandemic

By Victoria Lucas
Read more  >>  https://www.fox43.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/health-researchers-decrease-coronavirus-seniors-health/521-3ac52c8d-32f1-4872-9cbd-0670746e2b1a
_____________________________________________________
Senior living’s new message to Congress:
‘Don’t leave us behind again’

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/senior-livings-new-message-to-congress-dont-leave-us-behind-again/
_____________________________________________________
Older adults spent an average of $1,144
on technology during pandemic, up from $394

By Cassie McGrath
Read more  >>  https://www.masslive.com/news/2021/10/older-adults-spent-an-average-of-1144-on-technology-up-from-394-in-2019-and-used-devices-more-during-covid-pandemic-aarp-says.html
_____________________________________________________
Aspirin Use to Prevent 1st Heart Attack
or Stroke Should Be Curtailed
By Roni Caryn Rabin
_____________________________________________________
Federal action needed to address
antibiotic resistance in older Americans
_____________________________________________________
Exercise is the wonder drug
 for healthy aging

By Howard Gold
_____________________________________________________
Fact-checking 5 claims about conservatorships
By Kyley Schultz
Read more  >>  https://www.wusa9.com/article/news/verify/what-is-a-conservatorship-how-are-conservatorships-legal-free-britney-movement-explained-fact-check-conservatorships-guardianships/536-4634ac1f-fdbb-434d-ab2a-694a02addbe8







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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, OCTOBER 18. 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, October 14, 2021








OCTOBER 14, 2021



WILL NY FOLLOW CALIFORNIA’S LEAD?

California Creates New "Anti-Isolation" Restraining Orders
 for Elders and Dependent Adults


Highlights

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sept. 23, 2021, signed Assembly Bill (AB) 1243, a bill which creates a new class of "anti-isolation" restraining orders in the state. These new anti-isolation restraining orders, which go into effect on Jan. 1, 2023, will be transformative in the fight against elder abuse and will also create a dramatic new landscape for trust and estate litigators.

Under AB 1243, for the first time, family members and friends will be able to bring a petition seeking an order to enjoin the alleged isolation of an elder or dependent adult under the Elder Abuse and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act (Elder Abuse Act).



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IT’S OFFICIAL…


Press Release
Wednesday, October 13, 2021
For Immediate Release
Mark Hinkle, Press Officer
press.office@ssa.gov


Social Security Announces 5.9 Percent Benefit Increase for 2022

Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for approximately 70 million Americans will increase 5.9 percent in 2022, the Social Security Administration announced today.
The 5.9 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits payable to more than 64 million Social Security beneficiaries in January 2022. Increased payments to approximately 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin on December 30, 2021. (Note: some people receive both Social Security and SSI benefits). The Social Security Act ties the annual COLA to the increase in the Consumer Price Index as determined by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Some other adjustments that take effect in January of each year are based on the increase in average wages. Based on that increase, the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax (taxable maximum) will increase to $147,000 from $142,800.

Social Security and SSI beneficiaries are normally notified by mail starting in early December about their new benefit amount. Most people who receive Social Security payments will be able to view their COLA notice online through their personal my Social Security account. People may create or access their my Social Security account online at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

Information about Medicare changes for 2022, when announced, will be available at www.medicare.gov. For Social Security beneficiaries receiving Medicare, Social Security will not be able to compute their new benefit amount until after the Medicare premium amounts for 2022 are announced. Final 2022 benefit amounts will be communicated to beneficiaries in December through the mailed COLA notice and my Social Security's Message Center.

The Social Security Act provides for how the COLA is calculated. To read more, please visit www.socialsecurity.gov/cola.


=//=



Aspirin Use to Prevent 1st Heart Attack
or Stroke Should Be Curtailed
By Roni Caryn Rabin


Doctors should no longer routinely start most people who are at high risk of heart disease on a daily regimen of low-dose aspirin, according to new draft guidelines by a U.S. panel of experts.



The proposed recommendation is based on mounting evidence that the risk of serious side effects far outweighs the benefit of what was once considered a remarkably cheap weapon in the fight against heart disease.


The U.S. panel also plans to retreat from its 2016 recommendation to take baby aspirin for the prevention of colorectal cancer, guidance that was groundbreaking at the time. The panel said more recent data had raised questions about the benefits for cancer, and that more research was needed.



_____________________________________


Federal action needed to address
antibiotic resistance in older Americans

According to the most recent antibiotic resistance report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2017 six common antibiotic-resistant pathogens (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) caused an estimated 30,000 deaths in the U.S. and resulted in $4.6 billion in health care costs. New research published by The Pew Charitable Trusts, University of Utah, and Infectious Diseases Society of America revealed that over one-third of those deaths and costs came from the Medicare-aged population (65 years and older)—a disproportionate figure given that Americans 65 and older made up 15% of the U.S. population that year.



An age-related decline in the ability to fight off disease makes older Americans particularly vulnerable to antibiotic-resistant infections. Additionally, older adults are more likely to have multiple chronic conditions, which places them at a higher risk for severe infections. Finally, many older adults receive care at long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes, where infections can easily spread due to the close living quarters, frequent socializing, and group activities. And that older, higher-risk population is increasing: Americans 65 and older have been the fastest-growing age group in the past decade, thanks to the aging Baby Boom cohort—those born from 1946 through 1964.


___________________________________


Exercise is the wonder drug
 for healthy aging

By Howard Gold


If you could do one thing to improve your longevity, your physical health and your state of mind as you age, it’s as simple as this: move.



Studies have shown regular exercise is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, several forms of cancer, depression and dementia in older people. But only about one in four older Americans exercises regularly, researchers for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found, and nearly half get no exercise at all.


We’ve all seen the local TV news features about the90-year-old running his 20th marathon. But those are outliers; exercising can be as easy as getting up from the couch and walking around the house and as cheap as a pair of sweatpants and athletic shoes. The sheer inertia of a sedentary lifestyle, however, often prevents people from taking that first step.


___________________________________


Fact-checking 5 claims about conservatorships
By Kyley Schultz

The #FreeBritney movement has surfaced a discussion about conservatorships. VERIFY is fact-checking several questions about this controversial agreement.


WASHINGTON — Pop legend Britney Spears’ conservatorship and the #FreeBritney movement, along with documentaries on Netflix and Hulu, have prompted questions across social media about the controversial legal agreement.

On September 29, the judge overseeing Spears’ case, Penny Garland, suspended her father Jamie from his role in the process, approving Spears’ choice for a certified accountant to oversee her finances. In November, a hearing will take place to determine whether Spears’ conservatorship will be terminated.










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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15. 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, October 13, 2021







OCTOBER 13, 2021


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It’s Medicare Open Enrollment Time:
 Is Your Plan Still Working for You?


Every year Medicare gives beneficiaries a window of opportunity to shop around and determine if their current Medicare plan is still the best one for them. During Medicare's Open Enrollment Period, which runs from October 15 to December 7, beneficiaries can freely enroll in or switch plans.



During this period, you may enroll in a Medicare Part D (prescription drug) plan or, if you currently have a plan, you may change plans. In addition, during the seven-week period you can return to traditional Medicare (Parts A and B) from a Medicare Advantage (Part C, managed care) plan, enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, or change Advantage plans.


Beneficiaries can go to www.medicare.gov
or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) to make changes in their Medicare prescription drug and health plan coverage.


_________________________________________


Health study reveals seniors
are ahead in fighting the pandemic

By Victoria Lucas


After more than a year of a pandemic filled with reports of high levels of COVID-19 transmission, including its variants, one might say this period of time has no light at the end of the tunnel. However, a recent study by one of the nation's top health departments may bring just that.



Researchers from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services conducted a study showing a decrease of 265,000 COVID-19 cases in seniors. In addition to this, they found a reduction of 107,000 hospitalizations and 39,000 deaths from Medicare beneficiaries between January and May of 2021.

Those who conducted the study include individuals from the department's office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation or the ASPE.


____________________________________


Senior living’s new message to Congress:
‘Don’t leave us behind again’



Assisted living operators have faced more than $15 billion in COVID-related expenses, due staffing and supply issues, according to Argentum.



COVID-19 changed everything for senior living. It also should change the industry’s federal advocacy efforts, including a message to bring targeted dollars to providers.

That is what Argentum Senior Vice President of Public Affairs Maggie Elehwany communicated Sunday to attendees of a session at the National Association for the Support of Long Term Care’s 32nd Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.


________________________________________

Older adults spent an average of $1,144
on technology during pandemic, up from $394

By Cassie McGrath

Whether it be streaming movies, video chatting or navigating smart devices, the use of technology among older adults rose significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic according to AARP’s annual technology survey.



With older adults at a higher risk of COVID and social distancing guidelines in place, face-to-face interaction was very restricted. These changes caused adults 50-years and older to purchase new devices and use them more often. Sales for TVs, smartphones, tablets, wearables and audio devices all increased, according to AARP.


But the barriers to technology were not eliminated though, as AARP reported that older adults said cost, knowledge gaps and privacy concerns were among the top reasons they may be hesitant to adopt new technology.








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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14TH 2021






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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, October 12, 2021









It took a while for me to realize this. But the more I thought about it, the more sense it makes.
 
Why are we (residents) the only ones to bear the brunt of the extreme DOH lockdown protocols when it isn’t us that’s at fault? Think about it.
 
A group of residents go on an outing to a buffet restaurant. A trip sanctioned by our facility and allowed by the NY State DOH as per community norms established by the state government. And on that trip, at least one of our vaccinated residents comes in contact with some citizen who may or may not have been vaccinated and certainly unmasked, and contracts the virus. They return to our facility and, after a week, are removed to a hospital on an unrelated matter where they receive a positive test given routinely to all incoming patients. This prompts our facility to test all others that were on that trip with her and find three more people who test positive. Viola! Another 14 day lockdown.


Now here’s what’s got me thinking.
 
Why are the infection control procedures not the same for staff and administration as they are for us? After all, are they not as likely to come in contact with other possibly infected people? Perhaps more so. After all, they may leave the facility at day’s end, and go anywhere they want and mingle with whomever they want with little or no consequences other than a routine Covid test when they return to work. Why aren’t they quarantined  and locked down like we are? Why shouldn’t they have to remain here for 14 days? It all seems a little unfair, huh?

Unfortunately, “Fair” is not a word used by the DOH. They will do whatever they want to whom they want because they can get away with it. Especially when it’s a group of voiceless, vulnerable and complacent people they want to maintain control over. And even if there were some who might question the protocols, there is no provision, no person or persons to tell your grievances to. The DOH has made sure of that. No hotline, no website, no mail address that has been set up for complaints. And no one will get back to you even if you find a sympathetic ear.
 
This recent lockdown is unlike the one we endured for 16 months when people were dropping like flies and there was no vaccine. And therefor we should not be subjected to the same overbearing restrictions as before. But maybe the people who put us in this position should be……………………….



OCTOBER 12, 2021



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Is Social Security Failing Our Nation's Seniors?
By Sean Williams

Whether you're already retired or plan to retire at some point in the future, the chances are high that you'll be reliant on Social Security to some varied degree to make ends meet during your golden years.



Back in April, national pollster Gallup surveyed nonretirees to gauge how reliant they expected to be on Social Security income when they do hang up their work coats for good. A record 38% of respondents expect it to be a "major source" of retirement income, with another 47% believing they'll lean on the program as a "minor" income source. Only 15% of respondents believe Social Security income will be unnecessary during retirement. This is fairly consistent with the 10% of retirees surveyed by Gallup who aren't reliant on Social Security income.


In many respects, Social Security is a saving grace. It's providing monthly benefits to more than 65 million Americans, many of which are seniors. Although 72% (almost 47 million) of beneficiaries are retired workers, the program provides long-term disability coverage to more than 9 million disabled workers and their immediate family, as well as 5.8 million survivors of deceased workers.


_________________________________


Ban on negotiating Medicare
 drug prices under pressure

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Donna Weiner looks at Medicare’s prescription drug program from two different points of view.



As a participant, she wants to pay less for her medicines, which cost her about $6,000 a year. As a retired accountant who spent 50 years handling the books for companies, she sees a way to get there.

“You know from working in a business that it makes no sense for an administrator of a plan or a company not to be involved in what they have to pay out,” said Weiner, who lives near Orlando, Florida. For Medicare “to negotiate those prices down would be thousands of dollars back in my pocket every year,” she said.


_______________________________________________

Latest senior living stats reason to be ‘cautiously optimistic’
 about comeback from pandemic



The latest NIC MAP quarterly data, released Thursday, provide reasons to be “cautiously optimistic” about the senior living industry’s comeback from the pandemic, National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care Chief Economist Beth Burnham Mace told McKnight’s Senior Living.


A significant rebound in demand, combined with a modest increase in supply, contributed to a 1.4 percentage point increase in senior housing (independent living and assisted living combined) occupancy in the third quarter.

Occupancy inched up to 80.1% from a pandemic-related low of 78.7% in the second quarter. Measured separately, assisted living occupancy increased to 76.9%, up from a pandemic low of 75.4% in the first quarter. And in independent living, occupancy increased to 83.2%, up from a pandemic low of 81.8% in the first quarter.


______________________________________


4th stimulus check? Here's who's proposing it
 and why not everyone will get it

By  Travis Pittman


The 2022 Social Security cost-of-living adjustment could be the largest in decades, but it may not be enough to overcome inflation.



A nonprofit representing the interests of senior citizens is urging Congress to approve $1,400 stimulus checks for Social Security recipients. While these Americans are looking at possibly the largest cost-of-living adjustment in 40 years, experts say the amount they'll get likely won't match inflation and it could knock them into a higher tax bracket.

The Senior Citizens League (TSCL) said last month it expects the 2022 cost-of-living adjustment (COLA), which will be announced in October, to be 6% to 6.1%, based on consumer price data through August. If the 6.1% estimate holds once September is included, it would be the highest Social Security COLA since 1982.


_______________________________________


Trash Talk About Frayed Fashion:
Donating Unwanted Clothing and Textiles



Mismatched socks? Ripped shirts? Use this easy guide to learn how and where to donate these and other used clothing items.



Do you have a closet brimming with clothes that you no longer wear? Are you sorting through your parents' or grandparents' closets filled with clothing from as far back as the 1970s?


Do any of the following items occupy space in your drawers, closet or attic? What would you do with the following unwanted clothing or household textiles?











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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, October 11, 2021









4 minutes


We’ve just completed weekend number 1 of what we hope will be only a two-weekend lockdown. If all goes well, we will emerge from this reanimation of the 16 month nightmare we suffered, no worse for wear, on October 21st.
 
It seemed almost surreal when, on Thursday evening, a knock on my door ushered in another dinner-for-one served in the same plastic containers with the same plastic dinnerware and drinks in sealed plastic cups as we had for nearly 1500 strait meals just a few months earlier. And, just like before, the brunt of the ordeal is heaped upon the same people everybody is so eager to protect. Us residents.


If there is any positive to this second round of Draconian protocols placed on us by the DOH, it’s that now all of our residents and all of our staff have been vaccinated. This should ease some concerns that this will be another long lockdown. But, you never know. All that is needed is one more person to test positive and the two week “clock” starts over again and will continue to run until we have 14 consecutive days of negative COVID-19 tests.
 
As of now. We are taking this in stride. If the previous lockdown proved anything, it showed the resiliency of our residents. A stronger, more determined group of people I have never seen.
 
Not that we did not suffer.

Besides having to endure some terrible food, loneliness took its toll on all of us. It’s odd how such a basic activity as having a meal with others, when taken away, can cause such anxiety and angst.

This re-occurrence points out a very important thing. Even under the strictest precautions, it’s possible to contract and spread the virus to others. It also shows how important testing and contact tracing are in preventing further spread.
 
No one would have known anyone had contracted the virus if it hadn’t been for a COVID test that was administered by a hospital after one of our residents was taken there for an unrelated matter. After the resident was found to have the virus, the hospital contacted our facility. That began a round of finding out who she came in contact with and where she might have contracted the virus. The investigation led to an outing (held a week earlier) to a local buffet restaurant. After testing all that went on that trip, four more residents tested positive and have been quarantined in their rooms here at the A.L.F. None exhibited any symptoms and are doing well. This incident also points out that perhaps we are too eager to return to normalcy by allowing that trip to take place. In any event, I’m sure any activities that involve contact with the public have ended for now…………………….
 

OCTOBER 11, 2021


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Do I Have To Pay For My Parent’s Care?


Adult children often ask, do I have to pay for my parent’s care?  That depends. If you have taken control of your parent’s assets and income, absent a provision in a durable power of attorney allowing you to gift your parent’s funds to yourself, you are generally required to use your parent’s money to pay for their care.  But what if your parent’s funds are already spent down and beyond your reach? A recent published New York case considered this question and took an interesting and pro-child approach to the subject.


In Wedgewood Care Center, Inc., Etc. v. Kravitz, 2021 N.Y. Slip Op. 04731 (N.Y. App.Div., 2nd Dept., August 18, 2021), the New York Supreme Court Appellate Division overturned an award for a for profit nursing home, which sued the son of its former resident. The nursing home wanted to hold the son liable for his mother’s unpaid nursing home bill for the sum of approximately $49,000.  An irrevocable burial trust was funded with some of the mother’s funds.  The nursing home argued (among other points) that the resident’s son, who was named as her agent under her durable power of attorney, violated his mother’s nursing home admissions agreement by failing to use all of his mother’s money to pay for her care and by not getting his mother approved for Medicaid benefits quickly enough.


In the trial court, the resident’s son argued that he could not be held liable for the cost of his mother’s care, as this would violate the federal Nursing Home Reform Act.  The nursing home focused on the admissions agreement, which required the son pay his mother’s nursing home bills from the assets and income of his mother within his control if he could do so without incurring any personal financial liability. The trial judge ruled for the nursing home.


____________________________________

Using internet in retirement
boosts cognitive function


Using the internet during your retirement years can boost your cognitive function, a new study has found.


Researchers from Lancaster University Management School, the Norwegian University Science and Technology and Trinity College Dublin examined the cognitive function of more than 2,000 retired people from across Europe, and found that post-retirement internet usage is associated with substantially higher scores on tests.


The study, published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, uses data drawn from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) that collects information about the health, employment history and socio-economic status of older people.


_______________________________________

Depression and anxiety declined in the first half of 2021
but remained high, the C.D.C. reports.

By BENJAMIN MUELLER

The arrival of vaccines and declining Covid-19 cases in the first half of 2021 coincided with an easing of symptoms of anxiety and depression across the United States, according to survey data released on Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



But symptoms remained much more common in June 2021, the end of the survey period, than before the pandemic, and could be on the rise again because of the summer surge in cases of the Delta variant, C.D.C. scientists said.




The agency relied on a biweekly online survey conducted from August 2020 to June 2021. Researchers analyzed 1.5 million responses over that period about the severity of symptoms of anxiety or depression.


_________________________________________

Staying active in winter
poses challenges for seniors

By ALEX KRUTCHIK

With winter comes holidays, hot chocolate and cooler weather. But with cooler weather comes challenges. Because of icy and snowy weather, it can be challenging to stay active, especially for seniors.



Tracy Derschau, life enrichment coordinator at Menorah Park in Beachwood, and Diane Menges, wellness coordinator at Judson in Cleveland, said it is still important to stay as active as possible in the winter despite challenges it may bring.


Derschau said one of the silver linings of the COVID-19 pandemic is that it is easier than ever to be active at home due to increased focus on creating options based on necessity. Technology has played a strong role in being a creative use of space and time, she said.

________________________________________________


2 Ways to Give Loved Ones Access
to Your Bank Accounts After You Die



Would your loved ones have necessary access to your bank accounts after you die to help carry out your last wishes and handle arrangements? It's quite likely they won't unless you take a few essential steps now.

"If you have a bank account in a single person's name, it can take time to get access to," says Chester Spatt, professor of finance at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business in Pittsburgh.


To avoid that problem, you can designate a beneficiary on your bank accounts such as CDs, checking or money markets through what are known as Payable on Death Accounts (POD), sometimes called Transfer on Death accounts or Totten accounts.





-//-





Flu jab: Respiratory illnesses could claim
60,000 lives this winter
as NHS launches new vaccination campaign

By Laura Bundock

Health chiefs are warning there is a "realistic possibility" the UK will see a surge in flu cases this winter.



England's deputy chief medical officer Professor Jonathan Van-Tam says the winter of 1989/90 which saw 19,000 excess flu deaths is a "marker".


A report in the summer from Academy of Medical Sciences assessed how the triple threat of coronavirus, flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) might affect the NHS this winter.









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GOOD DAY
It’s Sunday, October 10, 2021







OCTOBER 10, 2021



 BREAKING...



The memo passed around Wednesday evening was benign. It told us an isolated case of COVID-19 was discovered in one of our recently hospitalized residents. Bad enough, but nothing to worry about. As noted, it was a single case, and the resident was not on the premises. Unfortunately, that quickly changed.
 
Thursday afternoon, all residents were summoned to the auditorium where our administrator gave us the bad news. WE WERE GOING ON LOCKDOWN, AGAIN.

 

Moans and groans came from all corners of the room. It was easy to understand why. Assembled in that place were a group of people who just came off a 16 month quarantine/lockdown. And we all knew the horrors that brought.

Isolation, loneliness, inactivity, and limited visitations. Not to mention the bad food, which now has to be delivered to our rooms. Once again, we are prohibited from congregating in groups for activities, including meals. The lobby and all sitting areas are off-limits. And masks must be worn in all common areas. And, while we are not confined to our rooms, contact with over one or two other residents is discouraged. It’s “Deja Vu all over again.”
 
It should be noted, all the residents who tested positive had been fully vaccinated and presented no symptoms. In addition, 100% of our staff has received the vaccine. Most likely, they contracted the disease on an outing to a local buffet restaurant held last week.
 
How long will this lockdown last? At least 14 days, provided there are no further infections during that time. The facility and the N.Y. State Department of Health will be closely monitoring the situation. Hopefully, we may return to our regular activities before the month is out…………




Risk of dementia 73% higher for people
 with these symptoms in early adulthood

By Danielle Echeverria

Depression in young adulthood might increase risk for cognitive impairment in old age, a UCSF study has found.


The study — which used predictive models to determine depressive symptoms over a lifetime — found that the chances of cognitive impairment were 73% higher for those estimated to have elevated depressive symptoms in early adulthood, and 43% higher for those estimated to have elevated depressive symptoms in later life.


The findings could create a new sense of urgency in treating young people with depression, as that might have the potential to help them later in life — especially as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to take a toll on the mental health of young people.


__________________________________________

Student Loan Strategies for Seniors and Retirees
By Becca Craig, CFP

The rule (or power) of three is an age-old maxim in rhetoric and other disciplines which states that things that come in threes are inherently more satisfying to us. If that’s indeed the case, do I have some good news for you: The pause on student loan repayment, interest and collections has been extended for a third time, until Jan. 31, 2022. The Biden administration and the U.S. Department of Education are adamant this will be the final extension, leaving many Americans anxious about their repayment strategy and how student loan debt will shape their long-term financial future. Especially sensitive to legislative and political issues surrounding student loans are retired and senior citizen borrowers.



The amount of student loan debt held by baby boomers has reached an all-time high, and it increased by 33% from 2019 to 2020. These figures include federal and private loans that baby boomers took out in their own names for their children’s college educations, commonly Parent PLUS loans. In pre-pandemic 2020, baby boomers had the highest average monthly student loan payment of any generation. Many older Americans still find themselves asking questions about the best way to pay off student loan debt in retirement.


The answer (as with all questions regarding student loans) is that it depends. There are various strategies and many options to consider if you find yourself nearing your golden years saddled with student loans (either your own or your child's). The good news is that you can take certain steps to wrest control of your repayment plan in retirement and that federal loan borrowers now have time on their side with the student loan payment and interest pause having been extended. Keep in mind, though, that if you refinance to a private loan at this time, interest accrual and payments would start immediately.


___________________________________________________

Take These Steps to Manage Foot Pain

Mobility can be an issue as you get older, but the problem may begin with foot pain or soreness which makes it harder to walk, stand up or climb stairs. It can affect balance, and could involve other parts of the body such as the knees and spine.


"Ignoring foot pain is often to the detriment of the patient's life," says Dr. Lance M. Silverman, of Silverman Ankle and Foot in Edina, Minn. "Living with it is always an option and patient choice. But there are so many non-surgical management and surgical treatment options available to patients to help them live more productive and fulfilling lives."

Common Causes of Foot Pain

Foot pain or cramping could arise from simple problems with easy solutions or it could signal more serious medical issues:


______________________________________________

Opinion: The other Social Security crisis —
 that almost no one is talking about

By Paul Brandus

One of the more trite sayings about the profession of journalism is that it’s supposed to “afflict the comfortable” and “comfort the afflicted.”



That sounds nice, but you know who else should be doing that? Our politicians. Isn’t it the job of those we send to Washington to look after their constituents—the people they claim to represent?


But this really isn’t how it works. Money talks, and the powerful and comfortable, through lobbyists and big campaign contributions that often don’t have to be disclosed (appropriately, this is called “dark money”) have a far easier time influencing the political process and getting the outcomes they want than those who lack this kind of clout.




Preview 2022 Medicare plans
You can preview 2022 drug plans (Part D) and Medicare Advantage Plans.
Starting October 15, you can enroll in 2022 plans.










AP-NORC poll: Virus fears linger for vaccinated older adults
By MATT SEDENSKY
Read more  >>  https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-business-lifestyle-health-illinois-e2d3f24eb72fd6aaa7074f5d3ac8754a
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New Census Report Reveals Growing
Number Of Childless Older Adults

By Sara Zeff Geber, PhD
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarazeffgeber/2021/09/28/new-census-report-reveals-growing-number-of-childless-older-adults/?sh=49d0ebe63a91
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Abdominal fat and weak muscles among
older adults can cause mobility problems

By Aanchal Nigam
Read more  >>  https://www.republicworld.com/lifestyle/health/abdominal-fat-and-weak-muscles-among-older-adults-can-cause-mobility-problems-study.html
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Should You Reveal a Diagnosis?
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
By the Numbers:
Four Headwinds Facing Senior Living

By Jack Silverstein
Read more  >>  https://seniorhousingnews.com/2021/09/28/by-the-numbers-four-headwinds-facing-senior-living/
_______________________________________________________________

3rd Covid Vaccine Shows Side Effects
Similar to 2nd Shot, C.D.C. Finds

By Benjamin Mueller
Read more >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/28/health/third-covid-vaccine-side-effects.html
_______________________________________________________________

New CDC profile shares demographics
 of assisted living residents

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/new-cdc-profile-shares-demographics-of-assisted-living-residents/
______________________________________________________________

3 studies link hearing loss with less
 physical activity among older adults

Read more  >> https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/3-studies-link-hearing-loss-less-physical-activity-among-older-adults
_______________________________________________________________

'Elderly' -- a label journalists should avoid
By Adrian Vore
Read more  >>  https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/about-us/readers-rep/story/2021-10-01/elderly-a-label-for-journalists-to-avoid
________________________________________________________________

The Limits of Your Last Will and Testament
By Sharon Waters
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/money/investing/info-2021/limits-of-your-will.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-SAPLA--CTRL-100121-P1-5824495&ET_CID=5824495&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
________________________________________________________________

Will There Be A Fourth Stimulus Check?
 Everything We Know So Far Amid Growing Petition

By Christina Zhao
Read more  >>  https://www.newsweek.com/fourth-stimulus-check-update-petition-monthly-2000-passes-29-million-signatures-1635025
________________________________________________________________

Campaign writes off stereotypes of aging
Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/editors-columns/campaign-writes-off-stereotypes-of-aging/
________________________________________________________________

Will You Need a Bigger Retirement Nest Egg?
By Maurie Backman
Read more >>  https://www.fool.com/retirement/2021/10/04/will-you-need-a-bigger-retirement-nest-egg/
________________________________________________________________

You May Be Overestimating
 Your Social Security Benefits

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/you-may-be-overestimating-your-social-4320282/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
_________________________________________________________________

Opinion: Overcoming barriers to digital
 inclusion for older persons

By J. Alison Bryant
Read more  >>  https://www.devex.com/news/sponsored/opinion-overcoming-barriers-to-digital-inclusion-for-older-persons-101698

__________________________________________________________________

Tallying the Cost of Growing Older
By Paula Span
Read more  >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/02/health/elderly-health-care-finances.html
__________________________________________________________________

Update: Social Security Benefits Lose 32 Percent of Buying Power
Read more  >>  https://www.wfmz.com/news/pr_newswire/pr_newswire_health/update-social-security-benefits-lose-32-percent-of-buying-power-according-to-the-senior-citizens/article_a2521f75-951f-55fb-9025-6b381892f8da.html
__________________________________________________________________

Hearing aid options expand, despite
 delay in over-the-counter sales

By Phil Galewitz
Read more  >>  https://www.unionleader.com/news/health/hearing-aid-options-expand-despite-delay-in-over-the-counter-sales/article_e8b10c62-2300-50fe-b141-5c9113c3f1f7.html
___________________________________________________________________

Why Amazon Echo Shows should be standard
 in every nursing home

By Lila MacLellan
__________________________________________________________________

Study: Pfizer Vaccine Protects Against
Hospitalization for Six Months

By Emily Anthes
Read more  >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/04/science/pfizer-vaccine-hospitalization-study.html?searchResultPosition=1
__________________________________________________________________

8 Things to Know About COVID-19 Booster Shots
Extra vaccine doses are now available to millions of Americans.
 Here's the latest on what to expect

by Rachel Nania
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/covid-booster-shot.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-092021-P1-5798077&ET_CID=5798077&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
__________________________________________________________________

Over 80% of Seniors Do Not Intend to
 Sell Their Home According to AAG Survey

Read more  >>  https://finance.yahoo.com/news/over-80-seniors-not-intend-130700420.html









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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, October 7, 2021





OCTOBER 7, 2021



At one time in this country, they taught gun safety to middle school kids. We teach the dangers of using controlled substances and even have laws criminalizing their use. We teach safe sex in high school. And who among us hasn’t had to pass a test to get behind the wheel of a car in order to drive? Why then are we not doing the same for those who use social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram? Why is there no competency test given before one may use the most powerful information dissemination tool ever invented?

Imagine if a twelve-year-old kid could hop, unsupervised, into the driver’s seat of dad’s BMW and take it for a spin around the neighborhood. How long would it be before that kid  (no matter how much he knows about the mechanics of the car) wants to find out how fast he can get that car to go despite that he’s in a 15mph school zone filled with children? It’s not that he’s stupid. He’s just too immature to comprehend the dangers of what he is doing. To him, it’s just fun. And it’s not only kids.

 
Have you ever been on a highway at 3am watching the car in front of you weaving in and out of the lane, empty cans of Budweiser on the dashboard? The guy driving that car knows he’s not supposed to be driving drunk, but he’s too irresponsible to care. Eventually, they may catch up with him and take away his license. That’s the way society deals with those who can’t do it for themselves. So why not do the same for social networking. Have all potential users of Facebook, Instagram or any of the other networks that permit interaction, take a test to show they have the maturity and personality to use it properly.

The questions would be simple and multiple choice. For example:

Smoking . Choose one...

A- Science tells us smoking is harmful and you should not do it.

B- Good for you and you should smoke as much as you like
C- I know it’s bad for me, but it looks cool, so I will continue to smoke.
D- My friends all smoke and I don’t want to be left out.

Easy, huh? But change “Smoking” to “Vaccinate” and see what happens.

Bottom line. It’s not the platform itself that’s bad or anti-social or failing. It’s the simple-minded users who are so easily manipulated by their know-nothing, irresponsible, anti-social, science-denying peers they will say anything just to “fit in.” And the groups they belong to add fuel to the flame of ignorance by agreeing with every stupid thing they post. It’s a paradise for absurdity, idiocy and ignorance.

Should Facebook be more responsible for the content that appears on its site? Should car manufacturers do more to keep irresponsible people from driving their cars? Should gun manufacturers not allow maniacal killers to get their product? No. Sometimes we just have to rely on ourselves to know  right from wrong…………………………






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Study: Pfizer Vaccine Protects Against
Hospitalization for Six Months

By Emily Anthes


The Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine is 90 percent effective at preventing hospitalization for up to six months, with no signs of waning during that time period, according to a large new U.S. study conducted by researchers at Pfizer and Kaiser Permanente.



The vaccine also provides powerful protection against the highly contagious Delta variant, the scientists found. In a subset of people who had samples of their virus sequenced, the vaccine was 93 percent effective against hospitalization from Delta, compared with 95 percent against hospitalization from other variants.


“Protection against hospitalization remains high over time, even when Delta predominates,” said Sara Tartof, an epidemiologist at Kaiser Permanente Southern California and the first author of the study.


________________________________________________

8 Things to Know About COVID-19 Booster Shots
Extra vaccine doses are now available to millions of Americans.
 Here's the latest on what to expect

by Rachel Nania

Millions of Americans who had the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine are now eligible for a booster shot, which is meant to wake up the immune system so it stays sharp if confronted with COVID-19.

And experts predict boosters for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccine recipients are right around the corner. Here’s what you need to know as the shots roll out:.


1.Boosters are available, but not everyone qualifies right now


Nearly 183 million Americans are fully vaccinated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but only a portion of this population can get a booster shot at this time. That’s because Pfizer is the only vaccine maker authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for boosters, so the additional doses are currently limited to the roughly 100 million Americans who were fully vaccinated with Pfizer’s product.



Limiting Medicare benefits
deepens rift among Hill Democrats

By Alice Miranda Ollstein


Means-testing Medicare, a long-running controversy in health policy debates, is re-emerging as a major source of tension for Democrats seeking a path forward on their stalled social spending package.


Centrist lawmakers are demanding that an expansion of the program to cover dental, vision and hearing care be limited to the poorest Americans, to pare the projected cost by as much as half.


But progressive lawmakers and powerful outside groups like AARP are pushing back, saying the move would fundamentally alter the social insurance program and jeopardize Democrats’ slim margins in the House and Senate by alienating wealthy senior citizens.

Read more  >>  https://www.politico.com/news/2021/10/01/medicare-benefits-hill-democrats-514946

______________________________________________________________________________

Older adults with type 1 diabetes more likely to be
 hospitalized for COVID-19 than youths

By Michael Monostra

Adults with type 1 diabetes are significantly more likely to be hospitalized if they contract COVID-19 compared with children, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.


In an analysis of people with type 1 diabetes with confirmed COVID-19, adults aged 40 years or older were about 4.2 times more likely to be hospitalized compared with youths aged 18 years and younger.


“Age older than 40 years is a risk factor for patients with type 1 diabetes and COVID-19, with children and younger adults experiencing milder disease and better prognosis,” Carla Demeterco-Berggren, MD, PhD, director of quality in the diabetes clinic at Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego, and associate clinical professor of pediatrics in the division of pediatric endocrinology at the University of California, San Diego, told Healio. “Public health recommendations, including wearing masks and vaccinating, need to be followed by all to reduce risk of contracting COVID-19.”


Over 80% of Seniors Do Not Intend to
 Sell Their Home According to AAG Survey



For older Americans, a home signifies much more than just a place to live. New data from American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation's leader in home equity solutions, shows that seniors' homes not only have a great deal of monetary worth, but also significant sentimental value. To gain a deeper understanding of exactly how meaningful home is to America's seniors, AAG conducted the Importance of Home Survey with over 1,500 participants ages 60-75.



"Our studies have shown that seniors in this country have a strong attachment to their home and the pandemic only strengthened that bond," said AAG Chief Marketing Officer Martin Lenoir. "It's no secret that many seniors have built substantial equity in their homes after years of ownership, but what is interesting is that very few want to sell their house to obtain that money. For seniors, the comfort, safety and independence of their home outweighs the desire to move and that's why we're seeing so many older Americans interested in reverse mortgages."

The Data Shows that Seniors Plan to Stay Put:








Covid US: Vaccines may have prevented 265,000 cases
 and 39,000 deaths among seniors

By Betsy Ladyzhets


Vaccination against COVID-19 saved approximately 265,000 seniors from contracting the disease and 39,000 from death in early 2021, a new report finds.


Researchers at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) analyzed Medicare data and county-level vaccination rates, finding that more vaccinated counties saw fewer COVID-related health issues among seniors.

Counties with the highest vaccination rates saw about 450 fewer Covid cases per 100,000 seniors compared to possible case rates if vaccines were not available.



Read more  >>  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-10061261/COVID-19-vaccines-prevented-265-000-cases-39-000-deaths-seniors.html






How Melbourne’s ‘short, sharp’ Covid lockdowns
 became the longest in the world

By Calla Wahlquist


It has been a long 19 months in Melbourne. As of Tuesday 5 October, Australia’s second-largest city will have been in lockdown for 246 days – overtaking Buenos Aires as the city that has spent the most cumulative days under stay-at-home orders.


By the time Melbourne’s current lockdown lifts at the end of the month, it will have spent 267 days in lockdown – 45% of the time since the coronavirus pandemic was declared on 12 March 2020.



It’s a strategy that has left the city feeling economically and psychologically depressed, but it has also succeeded, five times in a row, in reducing case numbers to zero.










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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, October 6, 2021






OCTOBER 6, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



Tallying the Cost of Growing Older
By Paula Span


Researchers have been studying how much care American adults will require as they age, and for how long.

Renee Turner, 37, has moved in with her grandmother, Nancy Canu, 92, who lives in Rochester, Mich., and has heart failure.



Say you’re a 65-year-old looking ahead, wondering about your health and your finances, pondering what life might be like in 20 years.

You might get lucky, like Susan Green, a retired social worker. At 82, she enjoys hiking, golfing and cross-country skiing (although she has given up downhill) with her husband in Ketchum, Idaho. The only assistance they need: a weekly housekeeper.




_____________________________________________


Update: Social Security Benefits
Lose 32 Percent of Buying Power

Consumer price index data through August 2021 indicates that the 2022 COLA will likely be about 6 percent. But soaring inflation this year has deeply eroded the buying power of Social Security benefits, according to a new update to an ongoing inflation study by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL). The study, which compares the growth in the Social Security cost of living adjustments (COLA)s with increases in the costs of goods and services typically used by retirees found that, since 2000, Social Security benefits have lost 32 percent of their buying power.



The annual COLA increased Social Security benefits in January of 2021 by just 1.3 percent. While mild inflation in 2020 did improve the buying power of Social Security benefits by 2 percentage points through the month of January 2021 — from a loss in buying power of 30 percent to a loss of 28 percent — that improvement was completely wiped out by soaring inflation in February and March of this year," says Mary Johnson, a Social Security policy analyst for The Senior Citizens League (TSCL). Based on consumer price data through July 2021, the erosion in the buying power of Social Security benefits has deepened to 32 percent over the 21 - year period.

Social Security benefits are one of the few sources of retirement benefits to be adjusted for inflation. The intention is to protect the buying power of benefits when prices increase. But retirees frequently notice that over time their Social Security benefits don't buy as much as they used to. This happens when the annual COLA doesn't keep pace with the increases in costs typically experienced by older and disabled beneficiaries.


__________________________________________________

Hearing aid options expand, despite
 delay in over-the-counter sales

By Phil Galewitz

Spurred by decades of complaints about the high cost of hearing aids, Congress passed a law in 2017 to allow over-the-counter sales, with hopes it would boost competition and lower prices.



Four years later, federal regulators have yet to issue rules to implement the law. But changes in the industry are offering consumers relief.


In August 2017, President Donald Trump signed the legislation that called for the Food and Drug Administration to issue regulations by 2020 for hearing aids that could be sold in stores without a prescription or a visit to an audiologist or other hearing specialist.


_________________________________________________

Why Amazon Echo Shows should be standard
 in every nursing home

By Lila MacLellan

Like many people, I could not visit my parents for most of 2020 and a large part of 2021. They had moved from one retirement home into another during the last week such places were open, the week before Covid-19 lockdowns began.



Pandemic restrictions kept my parents and their fellow residents, and millions of others globally, locked indoors for months without outside visitors. Much of that time was spent in their rooms alone, seeing staff for basic care, temperature checks, and food drop-offs whenever the building was coping with an outbreak. And outbreaks happened repeatedly. One two-week isolation period would roll into another when a new case developed, resetting the countdown clock. Though I could see how there were few other options, my heart still broke for my parents, quarantined and separated from each other, eating solo meals, and spending long days alone.

However, my sorrow was somewhat tempered with the help of technology. My sister and I had used some of our last pre-pandemic visit with our parents to set up Amazon Echo Shows in each of their new rooms. I had been using an Echo to help close the gap between New York, where I live, and Ontario, Canada, where they are, for a few years. Since the pandemic began, however, the Echo Show has been more than a convenient way to check in with them or say goodnight. It has allowed me to track their moods and any visible changes in their health, and to lift their spirits with music, or with TV shows that we could watch together if I pointed my Echo at my laptop screen.


-\\-





Brexit POLL:
Are British expats being treated badly after leaving the EU?

By Dylan Donnelly

BRITISH expats living in Spain have been forced to leave the country and return to the UK due to the treatment they have suffered in the country. Amid the large numbers returning to the UK, Express.co.uk is asking in today's exclusive online poll: "Are British expats being treated badly after leaving the EU?"



Boris Johnson 'needs to step up for British expats' says expert


Around 360,000 Britons are registered as permanent residents in Spain, but many more are estimated to have been living in the country without registering. Since the UK left the EU on January 1, Britons looking to move to Spain and other countries in bloc must meet certain conditions to gain resident status, including financial means and health cover.









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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, October 5, 2021





OCTOBER 5, 2021


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Will There Be A Fourth Stimulus Check?
 Everything We Know So Far Amid Growing Petition

By Christina Zhao


A senior citizens advocacy group is asking Congress to deliver legislation that would provide a fourth stimulus check of $1,400 to Social Security recipients in the U.S. That campaign comes as a petition calling on monthly cash payments of $2,000 for the wider population passes 2.9 million signatures.


The nonpartisan Senior Citizens League (TSCL) has gathered 38,720 supporters for a petition that calls for congressional lawmakers to pass a round of $1,400 "emergency stimulus checks" to assist an estimated 69 million Social Security beneficiaries—including retirees, disabled adults and their dependents, widows and widowers—in coping with the "unprecedented inflation year."

"A very significant portion are in fact pleading for help as quickly as possible," Mary Johnson, a policy analyst at TSCL, told Newsweek. "I've received multiple emails from people saying they face losing their home because they can't pay all the bills."


________________________________________________


Campaign writes off stereotypes of aging


Attend “milestone” birthday festivities and you’ll notice certain trends: somber black decorations and talk of being “over the hill.”


Working in senior living, you know that there can be challenges to getting older. But for most people, aging is not necessarily a negative experience.


I’m late to this party but just found out about a pretty cool initiative that is part of Changing the Narrative’s anti-ageism campaign.







_____________________________________________

Will You Need a Bigger Retirement Nest Egg?
By Maurie Backman

One of the trickiest things about saving for retirement is figuring out how much money to sock away. After all, if that period is many years away, determining what your monthly living costs will look like can be difficult.



But the one thing you should always do in the course of your retirement planning is err on the side of assuming that your senior years will cost more than you think. If you don't, you may end up with a nest egg that really falls short.


Many people aim to sock away 10% of their salary for retirement. That's certainly respectable. But it's also an outdated convention.




_____________________________________________

You May Be Overestimating
 Your Social Security Benefits


Studies have found that workers overestimate how much they will receive in Social Security benefits when they retire. Having a good understanding of the realities can help you plan for retirement.


Researchers from the University of Michigan studied the expectations of workers and found great uncertainty about future Social Security benefits as well as a tendency to overestimate the amount they think they will receive. Half of the workers surveyed in the study did not know their benefit amount. The average overestimation of the benefit was $307 a month, more than one-quarter of the average forecasted benefit. The study found that as workers got older, however, they were more likely to understand their benefits and less likely to overestimate benefit amounts.


Nationwide Retirement Institute’s annual Social Security survey similarly found that future retirees over age 50 expect to receive a higher payment than what actual retirees receive.  In this survey, respondents were off by nearly $200 a month. And almost 70 percent of Baby Boomers mistakenly believe that if they claim Social Security early, their benefit will go up automatically when they reach full retirement age. Not surprisingly, the Nationwide survey also found that more than half of workers are not confident in their understanding Social Security or how much money they will receive.


________________________________________________

Opinion: Overcoming barriers to digital
 inclusion for older persons

By J. Alison Bryant


Connect everyone by 2030. This beautifully audacious goal set forth by the U.N. Secretary-General, António Guterres, in the 2020 Roadmap for Digital Cooperation highlights the critical nature of digital inclusion for accomplishing many, if not most, of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. The past 18 months of the global pandemic have both heightened our clarity around this imperative, and also shown how far we have to go in achieving it.



5 ways to ensure the digital future doesn't leave people behind



Cina Lawson, Togo’s minister of digital economy and transformation, was one of several leaders who offered ways to ensure the digital future doesn’t leave people behind at last week's Sustainable Development Impact Summit.








The universal credit cut is the end
 point of years of ‘welfare’ cruelty

By John Harris


Here it comes. This Wednesday, the Department for Work and Pensions will finally end the £20-a-week “uplift” to universal credit introduced in March 2020. The cut will hit different households at different times, but it will formally arrive on the same day that Boris Johnson gives his big Conservative party conference speech in Manchester, which is sure to be full of boosterish talk about “levelling up”, the new global Britain – and, if recent announcements are anything to go by, the supposed prospect of a country that cannot currently feed itself becoming a major player in space exploration. On Earth, by contrast, millions of people’s sudden loss of £86.67 a month will inevitably trigger increases in debt, evictions and quiet, grinding want.




The surrounding picture only makes the cut look more cruel. Last week, the government’s furlough scheme came to an end, triggering fears of new redundancies and even more people being loaded into a benefits system that makes basic subsistence all but impossible. We all know about rising energy prices and food inflation. What the cut in universal credit will mean for lives already upturned by the pandemic hardly needs explaining; among other issues, in the midst of a crisis of childhood mental health, a change predicted to increase child poverty by nearly 300,000 children looks both reckless and nasty.








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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, October 4, 2021










Living in a suburban neighborhood, surrounded by private homes and wooded areas, and on the ground floor, one would expect to see and come in contact with a goodly amount of wildlife. We here at the A.L.F. (in a northern suburb of NYC) have ours.
 
In the course of a week, the casual observer could expect to see squirrels, voles, wild turkeys, deer, coyotes, raccoons, and the occasional opossum. And that’s just out of doors. Inside our rooms, it is not uncommon to find ants, spiders, flies, wasps, bees, hornets and roaches. And until last week, I have grudgingly put up with all of them. Even the mouse that runs in and out of my space on his way to wherever mice go to does not bother me too much. That’s because all of those critters mind their own business and DON’T MAKE ANY NOISE. As far as I know, most crawling bugs (at least the ones around here) are silent. And I can say, without hesitation, I’ve never actually heard a mouse squeak. But something different in the way of vermin entered my life recently that drove me batty. It was a rather benign creature we don’t give must thought to. An insect, when outside, lends background “music” to warm summer nights. The cricket. 


The average common black cricket is about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch long. And contrary to popular opinion, they do not make sound by rubbing their legs together. In fact, they sing with their wings. Run your finger down the teeth of a comb and you’ll hear an almost musical rattle. Crickets make sound in a similar way. They rub a scraping organ on one wing against a comb-like organ on the other.[1] Why? It’s all about securing a mate.
 
 “But crickets don’t just sing a pretty song and wait for the admirers to trickle in. Many of them have a whole repertoire of calls: There’s one for attracting females from afar, another for close-up courtship, and even a triumphal after-mating song. Crickets also sing to intimidate rival males, and some of a male’s more romantic tunes may trigger nearby females to fight each other.”
 
The romantic hopeful that entered my life surprised the heck out of me while I was watching TV on Friday night. At first I thought the familiar (almost cartoon-ish) chirping was part of the Netflix comedy on the screen. However, when the screen went dark for a few seconds during a scene change, and the chirping continued, I knew I had gained an unwanted guest. Like a bad roommate who likes to practice drum solos at all hours, that little bastard would not shut up. His incessant chirping lasted all night when, in true cricket form, he shut up.

Unfortunately, trying to find it proved to be a more arduous task than you would think. Their chirping, while loud, is hard to pinpoint. And that I am deaf in one ear made finding the noisy bugger that harder. After searching for 15 or 20 minutes, I gave up. As dawn approached, some seven hours later, he called it a night and kept quiet. Bleary-eyed, I dragged myself out of bed, vowing to go on a “search and destroy” mission should he make a reappearance the following night. And reappear, he did. This time louder and more insistent than before. Now his chirping sounded desperate. As if finding a lady cricket was a matter of life and death. My job was to put a stop to his courting ritual so I could get at least a few hours of much needed sleep.

After an intense search, twisting and turning my head so that my “good” ear targeted on the loudest sound, I tracked the source to my bathroom (he had obviously moved here during the day just to confuse me). After another minute or two pinpointing its exact location, I spotted the enemy. His black body silhouetted against the beige vinyl flooring. “YOU’RE MINE”, I said out loud, half expecting a response. But all I got was another round of chirping as if to say, “ Yeh! So what are you going to do about it?”
 

What I did about was to grab a can of bug spray from my nightstand and zap the nocturnal crooner three ways to Sunday. While the spray did not kill it, it stunned it to where I could pick it up with my grabber and deposit it (still alive) in the toilet. I watched as he disappeared into the swirling abyss, out of sight and out of my room.

Peace and quiet returned and I can again resume my normal sleep pattern, as broken as it may be. Hopefully, the crickets will stay outside where they belong. Now if I could only do something about that skunk………………….

[1]source: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/83942/11-cute-facts-about-crickets

-//-


OCTOBER 4, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


3rd Covid Vaccine Shows Side Effects
 Similar to 2nd Shot, C.D.C. Finds

By Benjamin Mueller

Americans who received a third dose of a coronavirus vaccine in recent weeks reported side effects at roughly the same rates as they had after their second shots, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday, a reassuring sign about the safety of additional doses.



At the time of the C.D.C. study, which stretched from mid-August to mid-September, additional vaccine doses were only authorized for people with compromised immune systems who had gotten two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine. Last week, though, federal regulators authorized Pfizer booster shots for broad swaths of the general population, making the safety of the additional doses an issue of intense interest for health officials, doctors and ordinary Americans.



The C.D.C. analyzed how commonly people reported side effects after a third dose compared with a second among 12,600 recipients who had filled out surveys as part of a voluntary safety monitoring system.


____________________________________________


New CDC profile shares demographics
 of assisted living residents



Bathing, walking and dressing are the most common activities of daily living that residents of assisted living or similar residential communities need help with, according to a new data brief from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The report sheds light on the characteristics of the 918,700 residents in those communities who received long-term care services as of 2018.




“With the aging of the U.S. population, the numbers of residential care community residents will likely increase, becoming a substantial segment of the long-term care population,” according to the report, titled “Residential Care Community Resident Characteristics: United States, 2018.”


Bathing, walking and dressing are the most common activities residents of assisted living or similar residential communities need help with, according to a CDC National Center for Health Statistics report. (Credit: CDC National Center for Health Statistics)


__________________________________________________


3 studies link hearing loss with less
 physical activity among older adults



Older adults with hearing loss may be more sedentary and more likely to experience worsening physical function than those without hearing loss, according to three recent NIA-supported studies. The findings, which were reported in JAMA Network Open and the Journals of Gerontology, Series A, suggest that treating hearing loss may be a way to promote healthy aging among older adults.



Hearing loss is common among older adults. About two-thirds of Americans older than 70 have difficulty hearing. In addition to aging, hearing loss can be caused by exposure to loud noises, certain drugs, disease, and heredity. Treatment options include wearing hearing aids, using assistive-listening devices, or having surgery to implant a small electronic device near the ear.


A team of investigators at NIA and Johns Hopkins University set out to learn whether hearing loss is associated with certain physical activity patterns among adults between the ages of 60 and 69. Using the results from hearing exams that had been conducted on a subgroup of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) participants, the team examined data from 221 people with normal hearing, 48 with mild hearing loss, and 22 with moderate to severe hearing loss. All these 291 participants had worn motion-based monitors on their hip for a week to capture how long they were engaged in sedentary behavior, light physical activity, and moderate or vigorous activity.


____________________________________________

'Elderly' -- a label journalists should avoid
By Adrian Vore


If you are 65 and older, would you describe yourself as “elderly”? I’m going to guess most readers would answer no. In fact, many might take offense to it.



That certainly was the case with reader Lisa Smith of Lake San Marcos, who objected to a headline on the front page Sept. 18. The headline read, “FDA panel backs booster for elderly or those at high risk.”

The panel was referring to those 65 or older.

Smith is 74, and does not see herself as “elderly.” Indeed, she said she plans on traveling for another five years “before settling in.”


_______________________________________


The Limits of Your Last Will and Testament
By Sharon Waters


That last will and testament you have tucked away? It may not be the last word on what happens to your stuff after you are gone. Instead, that legal document’s directives for doling out your wealth may be overruled by other paper­work and relevant laws. ​



“A will is a document of last resort to transfer assets,” says Eido Walny, a Milwaukee estate attorney. “There are a lot of ways to transfer assets that would preempt the terms of a will."


Here are some major assets that often fall outside a will’s scope, along with tips for getting them to the people or organizations you want.







12 Things You Must Know About Claiming and
 Maximizing Your Social Security Benefits



For many Americans, Social Security benefits are the bedrock of retirement income so maximizing this stream of income is critical.


The rules for claiming Social Security benefits can be complex, but this guide will help you successfully navigate the details. Educating yourself can ensure that you claim the maximum amount to which you are entitled.


Here are 12 essential details you need to know......


Read more  >>  https://www.kiplinger.com/retirement/social-security








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GOOD DAY
It’s Sunday, October 3, 2021









THE OTHER VACCINE

I'll be receiving my yearly flu shot later today, Friday. You remember the flu don't you. That's the other virus that can make you very sick, cause hospitalization and even death. It's also the virus that we Americans have had no problem being vaccinated agains for many, many years.

Why that vaccine is any different from the vaccine that has been proven beyond question to save lives and reduce pain and suffering, I'll never know.

I'm getting the flu shot for the same reason I took the COVID-19 vaccine. Because I'm old. I may have a compromised immune system and I don't want to spread my germs to any of my fellow residents here at the ALF. .................





OCTOBER 3, 2021

Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com


AP-NORC poll: Virus fears linger for vaccinated older adults
By MATT SEDENSKY

Bronwyn Russell wears a mask anytime she leaves her Illinois home, though she wouldn’t dream of going out to eat or to hear a band play, much less setting foot on a plane. In Virginia, Oliver Midgette rarely dons a mask, never lets COVID-19 rouse any worry and happily finds himself in restaurants and among crowds.



She is vaccinated. He is not.

In a sign of the starkly different way Americans view the coronavirus pandemic, vaccinated older adults are far more worried about the virus than the unvaccinated and far likelier to take precautions despite the protection afforded by their shots, according to a new poll out Wednesday from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.


 
Read more  >>  https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-business-lifestyle-health-illinois-e2d3f24eb72fd6aaa7074f5d3ac8754a


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New Census Report Reveals Growing
 Number Of Childless Older Adults

By Sara Zeff Geber, PhD

Childlessness is something the U.S. Census Bureau has never bothered to explore––until now. Those of us who have a keen interest in solo aging (adults over 55 with no children and those aging alone for other reasons) have been aware for many years of the rise in childlessness among boomers. The reverberations of this rise in childlessness will have far-reaching implications for the health and wellbeing of the aging boomers.



Is childlessness a Problem?

For the generations prior to the baby boomers, the average rate of childlessness hovered around 10%. That statistic mostly reflects the rate at which couples were infertile, for one reason or another. Nothing about infertility caused a problem for anyone other than the couples who desperately wished they could bear children. It didn’t pose a problem for society, because most people lived in close proximity to relatives at that time and if a childless woman or man managed to live long enough to need assistance, familial support was rarely far away.  

Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarazeffgeber/2021/09/28/new-census-report-reveals-growing-number-of-childless-older-adults/?sh=49d0ebe63a91

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Abdominal fat and weak muscles among
 older adults can cause mobility problems

By Aanchal Nigam

A threatening combination of weak muscles and abdominal fat can lead to major loss of gait speed among older people, stated a new study led by international researchers. The study was published in the ‘Age and Aging’ journal and conducted by the researchers at the Federal University of Sao Carlos (UFSCar) in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil in partnership with colleagues at University College London (UCL) in the UK. The researchers said that older people with abdominal fat, weak muscles face a risk of developing mobility problems.



While a slower gait is a natural outcome of the ageing process, mobility issues can also result if the walking speed falls sharply. Notably, even the day-to-day activities including crossing roads before the change of traffic lights can become significantly difficult. The international researchers also said that among the said adults, there might be a heightened risk of falling and gradual loss of independence if the situation further deteriorates.

Our comparative analysis showed loss of gait speed occurring mainly when abdominal fat and weak muscles were associated. Gait speed didn't decline so sharply in older people who had only abdominal fat or only weak muscles," said Tiago da Silva Alexandre, a professor at the Department of Gerontology, Center for Biological and Health Sciences, Federal University of Sao Carlos (CCBS-UFSCar), and last author of a paper on the study, as per ANI.


Read more  >>  https://www.republicworld.com/lifestyle/health/abdominal-fat-and-weak-muscles-among-older-adults-can-cause-mobility-problems-study.html

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Should You Reveal a Diagnosis?

Why some may choose to keep information private, and why friends should respect that decision



When I was in my 20s, my father was diagnosed with colon cancer. The night before his surgery, I was at my parents' house discussing my father's prognosis with a close friend over the phone.



After l hung up, my mother told me that she had overheard my phone call and was upset by what I had said. I was confused by her reaction. I hadn't said anything untrue, or with malintent. I had simply confided in a close friend. My mother countered that the information was "private" and should remain "in the family," not divulged to others.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

By the Numbers:
Four Headwinds Facing Senior Living

By Jack Silverstein

The COVID-19 pandemic left senior living in need of an occupancy comeback, as most operators reported significant declines in occupancy sustained through 2020 and into 2021. In addition to that major challenge, staffing shortages have increased, forcing operators to do more with less than ever before.



Digital marketing leader G5 is closely tracking these challenges, which relate directly to the marketing and sales changes needed in the changing senior living landscape. In its Senior Living State of the Industry Report, released September 2021, G5 has identified and quantified four major headwinds on the horizon.
#1 Occupancy

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, move-ins declined or were stagnant, making occupancy an overarching challenge that operators continue to face today. NIC MAP Data reports that in the second quarter of 2021, occupancy fell to record lows in both independent living, at 81.8%, and assisted living, at 75.5%.







Government shutdown:
What happens to Social Security,
SNAP, VA benefits and more?

By Debbie Lord
__________________________________________________________________
Why Dentists Oppose Democrats’ Plan to
 Add Dental Coverage to Medicare

By Ed Kilgore
Read more  >>  https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/09/why-dentists-oppose-plan-to-add-dental-coverage-to-medicare.html
__________________________________________________________________
Life expectancy of American men
fell by two years amid pandemic

By Mychael Schnell
Read more  >>  https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/574032-life-expectancy-of-american-men-fell-by-two-years-amid-pandemic-study
_____________________________________________________________________
How to Avoid the Scams Popping Up Everywhere
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/scams-emails-calls-avoid/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=1d16fc62bf-Tuesday_Newsletter_09_28_21___&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-1d16fc62bf-165407981&mc_cid=1d16fc62bf&mc_eid=94767a79b9
__________________________________
A 6% Cost-of-Living Adjustment to Social Security
 May Not Be Significant Enough for Average Seniors

Read more  >>  https://finance.yahoo.com/news/6-cost-living-adjustment-social-175504208.html?guccounter=1
____________________________________________________________________________
Older workers are a necessary part of the workforce:
Here’s what companies can do for them

By Helen Dennis
Read more  >>  https://www.dailynews.com/2021/09/26/older-workers-are-a-necessary-part-of-the-workforce-heres-what-companies-can-do-for-them/
___________________________________________________________________
COVID Has Been Harder On American Seniors
 Than Those In Any Other Wealthy Country

Read more  >>  https://www.scarymommy.com/seniors-american-face-greater-healthcare-economic-hardship-covid/
_________________________________________________________________
Compare Your Health and Drug Plan Options,
Says The Senior Citizens League

_______________________________________________________________
Overtreatment Prevalent in Elderly Patients
 with Type 2 Diabetes

By Connor Iapoce
Read more  >>  https://www.hcplive.com/view/overtreatment-prevalent-elderly-patients-type-2-diabetes
_________________________________________________
Adaptive exercises can help older
 adults increase independence

By Dr. Jason Koh
Read more  >>  https://www.presstelegram.com/2021/09/27/senior-living-adaptive-exercises-can-help-older-adults-increase-independence/_________________________________________________________
Morphine: A Misunderstood Medication
Read more >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/morphine-end-of-life-medication/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0015071d0a-Tuesday_Newsletter_09_14_21__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-0015071d0a-165407981&mc_cid=0015071d0a&mc_eid=94767a79b9
___________________________________________________________________
12 Things You Must Know About Claiming and
Maximizing Your Social Security Benefits

Read more>>https://www.kiplinger.com/retirement/social-security
___________________________________________
U.S. Slips in Retirement Index,
 and 682,400 Seniors Are Behind on Their Mortgage

By Nick Fortuna
Read more  >>  https://www.barrons.com/articles/u-s-slips-in-retirement-index-and-682-400-seniors-are-behind-on-their-mortgage-51632522013
_________________________________________________________________
Nursing homes charging ahead to administer
 COVID-19 vaccine booster shots

Read more  >>  https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nursing-homes-vaccine-booster-shots-covid-19/
_____________________________________________________________________
Older Adults May Experience Equal Benefit From
Cancer Immunotherapies as Younger Patients

By Skylar Kenney
________________________________________________________________
The 10 Best Small Towns to Retire in the U.S.
By Patricia Doherty
Read more  >>  https://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/senior-travel/best-small-towns-to-retire-us?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter
____________________________________________________________________
The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke
Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

By Jon Hamilton
Read more  >>  https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/09/20/1039017741/study-stroke-recovery-best-treatment
_______________________________________________________
Is it safe to get your COVID-19 booster
and flu vaccine at the same time?

By Lizzy Acker
Read more  >> https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2021/09/is-it-safe-to-get-your-covid-19-booster-and-flu-vaccine-at-the-same-time.html
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Workforce crisis among U.S. nursing home
and assisted living communities

By Jake Kratzenberg
Read more  >>  https://www.lanereport.com/146748/2021/09/workforce-crisis-among-u-s-nursing-home-and-assisted-living-communities/____________________________________________________________________
Identifying the Unique Challenges of Solo Agers
______________________________________________________
Socializing may improve older adults'
cognitive function in daily life

By Katie Bohn
Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-09-socializing-older-adults-cognitive-function.html
____________________________________
Taking 7,000 Steps a Day
May Be the Key to Living Longer

By Kayla Hui, MPH
Read more  >>  https://www.verywellhealth.com/step-count-matters-one-study-finds-5202333
______________________________________________________________________
What to Ask When Your Doctor Prescribes a Drug
9 important questions recommended
by the author of "Health Your Self"

By Janice M. Horowitz
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/what-to-ask-when-your-doctor-prescribes-a-drug/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3145ad4233-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_09_23__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-3145ad4233-165407981&mc_cid=3145ad4233&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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What debt ceiling woes could mean
for Social Security benefits

By Lorie Konish
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/22/what-debt-ceiling-woes-could-mean-for-social-security-benefits.html
___________________________________
Low BMI and malnutrition, but not obesity, are risk
factors for older adults dying from COVID-19

Read more  >> https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-09-bmi-malnutrition-obesity-factors-older.html
__________________________________
Nursing homes misdiagnose and sedate residents with
 strong drugs but lag on vaccinating staff

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/nursing-homes-misdiagnose-and-sedate-6034356/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
______________________________________________
Why Older Adults Are at Risk for
Severe Breakthrough COVID​​

By Rachel Nania
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/older-people-breakthrough-covid.html











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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, September 30, 2021







SEPTEMBER 30, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



Government shutdown:
What happens to Social Security,
SNAP, VA benefits and more?

By Debbie Lord

The U.S. Senate failed on Monday to pass a measure that would have suspended the federal debt ceiling and stave off a partial government shutdown set for the end of this week.



The bill, introduced by Senate Democrats, sought to pass a measure that funds the government through Dec. 3, and suspends the debt ceiling through Dec. 16, 2022. The measure had already been approved by the House.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said of the vote that Republicans are not willing to pass any measure that would raise or suspend the debt ceiling.

“We will support a clean continuing resolution that will prevent a government shutdown,” McConnell said. “We will not provide Republican votes for raising the debt limit.”


______________________________________________

Why Dentists Oppose Democrats’ Plan to
 Add Dental Coverage to Medicare

By Ed Kilgore

On the surface, you’d expect dentists to be fond of the Democratic proposal to expand Medicare to include dental (along with vision and hearing) coverage. It’s one of the things progressives are battling to include in the fiscal year 2022 budget reconciliation bill, a.k.a. the Build Back Better package, assuming Democratic centrists don’t shrink the price tag so much that big Medicare improvements become unaffordable. So the medical professionals who care about good teeth and gums and would get the actual Medicare dollars must be big fans, right? Wrong, as the Wall Street Journal reports:


The American Dental Association is mobilizing its 162,000 members to fight a proposal to include dental coverage for all Medicare recipients, opposition that could prove pivotal as Democrats look to make cuts in their $3.5 trillion domestic policy agenda.


 Giving dental, vision and hearing benefits to the 60 million older and disabled Americans covered by Medicare will provide needed care to people who otherwise might not afford it, supporters say.


__________________________________________________________________

Life expectancy of American men
fell by two years amid pandemic
By Mychael Schnell

The life expectancy of American men decreased by two years during the pandemic, according to a new study published Monday by Oxford University.



The study found that life expectancy among men fell by 2.2 years relative to 2019,  the largest drop among the groups that were observed, according to Reuters.


Life expectancy decreased by more than six months compared to 2019 for 22 of the 29 countries examined as part of the study, according to Reuters, which includes the U.S., Chile and nations in Europe.



___________________________________________________________________________

How to Avoid the Scams Popping Up Everywhere


Ways to fend off scammers who are snaring people through phishing emails, texts and calls — and what to do if you fall victim



In August, while checking her email, Deb (she prefers not to reveal her last name) was alarmed to read one she received that looked like it came from the online payment company PayPal. It said someone had accessed her PayPal account and taken $500 from her linked bank account.


Deb, a retired business owner in rural South Carolina, immediately called the phone number in the email to correct the issue. "The person was very professional," she said.


___________________________________________

A 6% Cost-of-Living Adjustment to Social Security
 May Not Be Significant Enough for Average Seniors



Social Security beneficiaries could see the biggest cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) in over a decade thanks to inflation. Due to rising prices, COLA could be in the 5.5% to 6.0% range, said David Certner, legislative counsel and director of legislative policy for government affairs at AARP.



Understand: Inflation’s 6% Cost-of-Living Increase to Social Security Could Be Double-Edged Sword
Social Security Eligibility: What It Takes to Receive Max Monthly $3,895


“With one third of the data needed to calculate the COLA already in, it increasingly appears that the COLA for 2022 will be the highest paid since 1983 when it was 7.4%,” Mary Johnson, Social Security policy analyst for The Senior Citizens League, explained via AARP. COLA depends on price changes between July and the end of September. The Social Security Administration announces any changes in October with adjustments going into effect in January.


_____________________________________________

Older workers are a necessary part of the workforce:
Here’s what companies can do for them

By Helen Dennis


Q. Sometime ago, you wrote about the advantages of working in later life. That was very helpful in my discussion with my husband and his decision of whether to retire or to continue working. Now, can you write about why employers should hire older workers? We older folks may decide to work but then, who will hire us at 60, 70 and 75 years? L.B.



Your question is timely and relevant. The importance of older workers is highlighted during the National Employ Older Workers Week held the last full week in September. The goal is to increase awareness of the older employee segment of the workforce and to develop strategies that tap the potential of experienced workers. The week also is to honor the dedication, experience and commitment that older workers bring to the workforce.


Global research analyst Josh Bersin and Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, chief innovation officer at ManpowerGroup, wrote a 2019 article published in the Harvard Business Review entitled “The Case for Hiring Older Workers.” According to the piece, roughly ten thousand companies had been asked, “Is age a competitive advantage or disadvantage in your organization?” Unsurprisingly, more than two-thirds of the companies considered age a competitive disadvantage. Age discrimination is pervasive as indicated by an AARP report that found two-thirds of those aged 45 to 74 observed or experienced age-related discrimination. And most age discrimination in the workplace is not reported.








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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, September 29, 2021







SEPTEMBER 29, 2021
Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



“V”-day, Followup

As of 12 midnight last night, by mandate, all employees of healthcare operations including hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities like mine will have had to have taken at least one COVID-19 shot to remain employed.[1] Some said this would cause chaos in NY State’s healthcare system as thousands of unvaccinated workers (including RNs and LPNs) would be let go. Well, that did not happen. Not to any great extent, anyway. Why? Because evidently, people would rather get vaccinated and keep their jobs than join the ranks of the unemployed. And there are statistics to back up that theory. As of the deadline last night, 91% of healthcare facility employees in New York State had taken at least one shot. This compares to only 77% last month, before the mandate. Proving that sometimes it’s necessary for the government to stand fast when the health and safety of its citizens are involved. And our little paradise-on-the-hill is no exception.


While I don’t know the exact number of unvaccinated employees here at the Asylum (the unofficial estimate was 15 to 25%) I can tell you all of those that I know that were anti-vaxxers have thrown caution to the wind and complied with the mandate. It was nice to see their shining faces doing the important job of taking care of those of us who need help with everyday tasks. And a brief survey of some of my fellow residents showed there were no perceivable interruptions in service because of a shortage of employees. Therefore, while others in our state were frantically trying to get the courts to validate their claims of “Freedom of choice” and not get vaccinated and to continue to work, putting others in danger, we here have cooler (and smarter) heads prevailing.
 
Was it dedication or just the thought of not getting a paycheck that changed the minds of vaccine-hesitant employees? We may never know. But I’m happy to see the people we depend on every day are still with us. And, because they are vaccinated, will be with us for the foreseeable future as well………………….

[1] The mandate that would apply to employees of public schools has been postponed until Friday, Oct. 1 at 5pm







COVID Has Been Harder On American Seniors
 Than Those In Any Other Wealthy Country



As of Monday, August 2 of this year, 90% of U.S. residents age 65 or older have received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, according to Kaiser Health News. Given that the vaccine has become so highly politicized, with conservatives more likely to oppose pandemic mitigation measures and older people being more likely to lean conservative, that number might come as a shock to some. Still, it’s heartening to see older folks trusting in science and taking care of themselves. Hopefully these folks are encouraging their kids and grandkids to go get vaccinated too.


Despite the promising percentage of seniors getting vaccinated in the U.S., it can’t exactly be said that U.S. seniors are doing well — at least not compared to other high-income countries.


The Commonwealth Fund has released results from its 2021 International Health Policy Survey of Older Adults. Researchers surveyed more than 18,000 adults aged 65 and older in 11 high-income countries, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the U.S.


_________________________________________


Compare Your Health and Drug Plan Options,
Says The Senior Citizens League


An estimated 39 million Medicare beneficiaries spend up to 29 percent of their Social Security benefits on healthcare costs, according to a new survey by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL). "That's a huge chunk of one's household budget, and chances are that many of those people are paying too much for premiums, deductibles, and out – of – pocket costs," says Mary Johnson a Medicare policy analyst for The Senior Citizens League. "One of the best financial moves that Medicare beneficiaries can make is to review health and drug plan coverage and compare options during Medicare's Fall Open Enrollment Period, which starts October 15 and runs through December 7, 2021," Johnson says. "For many people, it could potentially save hundreds of dollars, making the difference between having to split pills or going without, versus covering all prescriptions and still winding up with a little cash left over," says Johnson, who helps her friends and family with the task.


With inflation soaring in 2021, The Senior Citizens League has received dozens of emails from retired and disabled adults who say they have cut back on prescription drugs to cope with rising costs, because they have no savings. Said one disabled retiree, "My husband and I have Social Security as our only income. All of our savings went to pay my medical bills. I have seven prescriptions and my husband has three. They are each a minimum of $12 co-pay per month. We have no extra money. Our grocery budget is the only place we can cut from if we want to pay medical bills."


__________________________________________


Overtreatment Prevalent in Elderly Patients
 with Type 2 Diabetes

By Connor Iapoce


A total of 269 participants were considered potentially overtreated, while 109 participants were appropriately on target, and 56 participants potentially undertreated.
figure image



As the prevalence of diabetes rises with the overall aging of the population in the United States, a lack of data on the benefits and risks associated with treatment intensification highlights the potential for harm of overtreatment, as well as the consequences of undertreatment of older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D).


Due to this, a recent study investigated the potential shift toward the use of newer medicine, with low-risk of hypoglycemia, as well as the characteristics and factors associated with individualized diabetes management focusing on potential overtreatment and undertreatment.


_____________________________________


Adaptive exercises can help older
 adults increase independence

By Dr. Jason Koh


Being a board-certified physiatrist, I often work with the 55-year-old-plus population, and whether it is a result of an illness, injury or just the product of aging, the biggest thing I hear from this group when discussing goals and outcomes is, “I want to keep my independence.”



And I completely understand that!


Starting to feel as if you’re losing your independence by your family suggesting you move to an assisted living facility, or in with them, can be hard to hear and accept. We all need to also understand, that eventually we will need to accept that reality. There are things you can do today, however, to try to maintain and keep your independence as long as possible – namely, exercise.


________________________________________

Morphine: A Misunderstood Medication


Physicians and caregivers work to clear up myths about powerful end-of-life drugs



Within weeks of being diagnosed with multiple myeloma at 87, it became clear that Rosaire Roberts Hall was at the end of her life. Last summer, she moved from her lake house in the woods of northern Minnesota to a hospice home that was nearer to her family.


"The disease took off fast, but she was still sharing memories at the end. We sat together and she told stories I'd never heard," said her granddaughter Heather Kern, of St. Cloud, Minn.








12 Things You Must Know About Claiming and
Maximizing Your Social Security Benefits


For many Americans, Social Security benefits are the bedrock of retirement income so maximizing this stream of income is critical.



The rules for claiming Social Security benefits can be complex, but this guide will help you successfully navigate the details. Educating yourself can ensure that you claim the maximum amount to which you are entitled.


Here are 12 essential details you need to know.
Know Your Social Security ‘Full Retirement Age’











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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, September 28, 2021








SEPTEMBER 28, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



U.S. Slips in Retirement Index,
 and 682,400 Seniors Are Behind on Their Mortgage

By Nick Fortuna

The U.S. fell one spot to No. 17 among developed countries in Natixis Investment Managers’ 2021 Global Retirement Index, as Iceland topped the rankings for the third consecutive year. The ninth annual report provides a snapshot of the relative financial security of retirees in 44 countries. 
 


Separately, a survey of 401(k) participants found that the pandemic has contributed to financial stress for younger workers more so than for older workers, and a federal report determined that almost 700,000 seniors were behind on their mortgage payments in July, raising concerns about a possible spike in homelessness among older Americans.
Here’s the latest Barron’s roundup of retirement-related news and research. 



___________________________________

Nursing homes charging ahead to administer
 COVID-19 vaccine booster shots


Nursing home and assisted living facilities are preparing to roll out COVID-19 vaccine booster shots for their residents and staff, while grappling with an acute labor shortage that's likely to get worse as a federal vaccine mandate takes effect.


Expressing "how grateful we are that the Biden administration prioritized nursing homes," Janet Snipes, executive director at Holly Heights Nursing Center in Denver, Colorado, told CBS MoneyWatch that the facility is now working to get individuals' consent for the boosters. "We're not completely finished, but we haven't had anyone decline."
Holly Heights began reaching out to residents and their families several weeks ago in anticipation the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approving Pfizer-BioNTech boosters for millions of older or vulnerable Americans, including nursing home residents and those who work at the facilities. Boosters for those who received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines are expected to be approved in coming weeks.


_____________________________________

Older Adults May Experience Equal Benefit From
Cancer Immunotherapies as Younger Patients

By Skylar Kenney, Assistant Editor

Elderly patients with cancer may benefit as much as younger patients from immunotherapies, according to a study published in Cell Reports. The investigators said the results suggest potentially expanding the use of these therapies in the elderly, a population in whom immunotherapies may be under-prescribed.


“The interaction between age, immunity, and cancers has been understudied, particularly with the rise of cancer immunotherapies,” said Rossin Erbe, a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in a press release.

According to the investigators, aging simultaneously increases cancer incidence and lowers general immunity, with older patients becoming less capable of mounting an effective immune response to disease. As a result, immunotherapies are less frequently prescribed to older adults, despite some clinical trials suggesting that elderly cancer patients have equal or better responses to immunotherapies compared to younger patients.


________________________________________


The 10 Best Small Towns to Retire in the U.S.
By Patricia Doherty

There's something about small towns that inspires nostalgia and the feeling that traditions of the past still exist on their quaint main streets. Many retirees look for that atmosphere, whether it recalls their own history or a long-imagined ideal place to settle down. There are also practical reasons to move to a small town upon retirement, including affordability, safety, wellness, culture, and comfort. Although not every town offers the ideal combination of these factors, there are many that meet the needs of retirees seeking a simpler life.



Definitions of small towns in terms of population vary from under 10,000 to several times that. Sometimes, towns are considered "small" based on their appearance, lifestyle, or sense of community. In creating this list of small towns, we looked at a variety of qualities (including cost of living, crime data, healthcare availability, senior housing, activities, transportation, and attractions and activities in the area) with the understanding that "best" is ultimately a matter of taste.

Here are some of America's best small towns to consider for retirement or perhaps even for a weekend visit.


__________________________________________


The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke
 Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

By Jon Hamilton

People who have had a stroke appear to regain more hand and arm function if intensive rehabilitation starts two to three months after the injury to their brain.


A study of 72 stroke patients suggests this is a "critical period," when the brain has the greatest capacity to rewire, a team reports in this week's journal PNAS.
The finding challenges the current practice of beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after a stroke and suggests intensive rehabilitation should go on longer than most insurance coverage allows, says Elissa Newport, a co-author of the study and director of the Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery at Georgetown University Medical Center.


__________________________________________


Is it safe to get your COVID-19 booster
and flu vaccine at the same time?

By Lizzy Acker

We’re already several days into fall, which means it’s time for gratuitous pumpkin spice-flavored products and, of course, your flu shot.


According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, now is the time to get inoculated against influenza viruses. Even though for the last year and a half most people have been doing their best to avoid getting COVID-19, it’s also important to avoid the flu, officials say, which ticks up in the fall and winter and can also prove fatal.

But every year there’s an effective vaccine to prevent the flu. You just need to go out and get it. At a pharmacy, at a clinic, at your doctor’s office. Wherever flu vaccines are given and preferably before October is over.










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NEXT NEW BLOG WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, September 27, 2021







SEPTEMBER 27, 2021






Although I have only been to 4 physical therapy sessions, I can safely say I am still alive and able to move most of my body without wincing in pain or doubling-up in on giant muscle cramp. The truth be told; I believe even the limited amount of an actual workout may actually have done some good.
 
Now don’t misunderstand. I am still well aware of the limitations of my body and that I am far away from anything that would resemble normal. But I have seen some progress. Unfortunately, attaining even a minimum increase in strength and flexibility can wreak havoc on here-to-for unused muscles and tendons. And it surprised me what specific exercises caused me the most pain.

One of my main goals when I signed up for this twice-weekly torture was to improve my stamina. The time and distance I can walk without stopping and gasping for breath. One way to do that is to get on a treadmill and walk. When I began three sessions ago, I could only manage three minutes at about 1mph before I had to stop. Now, I can do over 6 minutes at 1&1/2 mph before my lungs and legs give out. A minor triumph, but a triumph none the less. And I barely feel any distress from doing it. Win-win for me. If only some of the other exercises were as benign.


What I found most painful, as well as disagreeable, was a very simple (to the eye) procedure knows as a side-leg-lift.
 
Using a chair (or in my case, a cane) for balance,  I lift one leg to my side as far as I can. I repeat this ten times before switching legs. This is repeated three times for each leg. Easy, right? Not if you have not used those muscles in over 12 years, it’s not. And thus, the pain. Pain that does not come on immediately but hours later, and lasts for days. Fortunately, there is Tylenol, which eases most of the crippling, allowing me a modicum of mobility while my body recuperates.

The question; is it worth it? Yes, it is. Because, despite the pain, I actually feel better. And, because of the pain, I know it’s doing me some good. And, combined with the other exercises designed to strengthen my lower extremities, eventually (hopefully) I can restore some of what I lost during the lengthy COVID-19 lockdown/quarantine.

Because of the Jewish holidays this month we lost some sessions. But beginning next month we will be on a regular twice-weekly schedule. That’s when the real fun begins…………

<[]>



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Workforce crisis among U.S. nursing home
 and assisted living communities

By Jake Kratzenberg


The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and long term care facilities across the country, released a survey of nursing home and assisted living providers across the U.S. Results from the survey highlight an urgent need for Congress to address the labor shortage facing the long term care industry.

Key findings include:




86 percent of nursing homes and 77 percent of assisted living providers said their workforce situation has gotten worse over the last three months


.
Nearly every nursing home (99 percent) and assisted living facility (96 percent) in the U.S. is facing a staffing shortage. 59 percent of nursing homes and nearly one-third of assisted living providers are experiencing a high level of staffing shortages.


___________________________________________

Identifying the Unique Challenges of Solo Agers

Over 30 years ago, researchers and geriatricians identified an "elder orphan" (sometimes called a "solo ager") as a person aging alone with little support. But when my Elder Orphan Facebook group targeting this population launched over 2 1/2 years ago, little was known about them. Even then, few realized that the hardships faced by older people with no nearby family members could be any different from those of others aging at home.



Health care professionals and companies tend to lump the older population into four segments: ages 55 to 64, 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and 85 and older. It's assumed that people in these age brackets deal with, or eventually could deal with, similar concerns relating to health, housing, transportation, caregiving and safety. But those concerns are further magnified for those who do not have a support system, and that number may be higher than you imagine. For example, in Dallas, where I live, 30 percent of people 65 and older live alone.

Thankfully, through the dedicated service of social workers, gerontologists and geriatricians, the unique challenges of the solo ager have been identified. The most recent research project, headed by Rupal Parekh, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Texas at Arlington, School of Social Work, with the Elder Orphan Group, uncovers the preliminary data that brings clarity about the issues facing this segment of the population.


___________________________________


Socializing may improve older adults'
cognitive function in daily life
By Katie Bohn


Socializing with others is important for mental health and well-being, and it may help improve cognition, as well—especially for older adults, according to new research.


In a study led by Ruixue Zhaoyang, assistant research professor of the Center for Healthy Aging at Penn State, the researchers found that when adults between the ages of 70 and 90 reported more frequent, pleasant social interactions, they also had better cognitive performance on that day and the following two.

Zhaoyang said the findings—recently published in the journal PLOS ONE—may have special relevance now due to social distancing mitigation measures throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.


_______________________________________


Taking 7,000 Steps a Day
May Be the Key to Living Longer
By Kayla Hui, MPH


A study conducted by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that taking a minimum of 7,000 steps per day was associated with a 50 to 70% lower chance of early death among middle-aged adults.



There are simple steps you can take to increase your daily steps like taking the stairs instead of the elevator.
Researchers hope to expand on the study and explore how step count impacts younger folks.


Reaching 10,000 steps a day has long been touted as the optimum goal to reach in order to stay healthy and active. But a new study suggests you can walk fewer steps a day and reap similar health benefits.

In an effort to demystify the 10,000 steps gold standard, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst conducted a study to explore its impact on health.  


________________________________________

What to Ask When Your Doctor Prescribes a Drug
9 important questions recommended
by the author of "Health Your Self"

By Janice M. Horowitz

Our experience of medicine is maddening — and hidden factors are always at play in the background that compromise our care. But when you're in the thick of things, sitting with a doctor and eager to be the good patient, you're likely to nod, agree and go along when your physician says: "Just take these pills each morning."


If your doctor hasn't asked you about what other medications and supplements you are taking, then ask them to ask you.


Instead, you need to perk up, pierce through the curtain that's obscuring what's really going on and start asking questions. When you're asking them, make it clear that you're not trying to be an aggressive patient. Be polite. Doctors are people, too, and will treat you better if you're, well, nice.







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NEXT NEW BLOG TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Sunday, September 26, 2021












Monday, September 27th 2021, will be a critical day for us here at the ALF and for all residents and patients of assisted living venues and nursing homes in our nation. It is the day when ALL employees of long-term care facilities must show proof of having been vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to remain employed in those facilities. Until now, vaccinations were optional. But that will end, along with the jobs of many people who, for whatever reason, decided not to get vaccinated. And, if we are to believe the operators of those facilities, the possibility of losing 25% of their employees is possible.


Let me say that I have great compassion for the staff here at the assisted living facility at which I am a resident. They are wonderful, dedicated people who are grossly underpaid and under-appreciated. Most of them do a thankless job with dignity and compassion. And I am sympathetic to those that may not be working here after Monday. But I feel even more sympathy and compassion for my fellow residents who have just come out of a 16-month-long lockdown/quarantine and are just one COIVID-19 case away from a return to that nightmare.

What will happen here Monday is not clear. There is a general news blackout about how many employees will be let go and the effect that will have on the services and care provided to our residents. We have never been given any statistics regarding how many employees will be affected by the mandate. I suspect we will discover that next week. I do know that our facility has been scurrying to hire new, fully vaccinated staff, but that takes time. The vetting procedures are strict and involve background checks and training. Monday will also mean saying goodbye to people we know and love. And that, for many, will be difficult. But we have to remember that the people those workers care for are among the most vulnerable demographic for contracting and dying from the virus. And having these ticking “time bombs” among us is too much of a risk to take. I will let you know what, if any, effect a possible staff shortage has on us. To be continued…………………………
 
 



SEPTEMBER 26, 2021


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What debt ceiling woes could mean
 for Social Security benefits

By Lorie Konish


Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen made headlines this week with an op-ed suggesting government checks could run dry if Congress doesn’t raise the debt ceiling.

“Nearly 50 million seniors could stop receiving Social Security checks for a time,” Yellen wrote.



The House of Representatives has passed a bill to temporarily fund the government and suspend the debt limit. However, that legislation could fail in the Senate. If lawmakers cannot come to an agreement, the government would shut down on Oct. 1.

Social Security beneficiaries may breathe a sigh of relief to know that the program’s funds will still be there to pay their checks, regardless of what happens with the debt ceiling negotiations, according to Nancy Altman, president of Social Security Works, an advocacy group focused on expanding benefits.


____________________________________


Low BMI and malnutrition, but not obesity, are risk
factors for older adults dying from COVID-19



A recent study published in Clinical Nutrition shows that low BMI and malnutrition are risk factors for in-hospital mortality in geriatric COVID-19 patients. The study was performed at Karolinska Institutet in collaboration with Theme Inflammation & Aging at Karolinska University Hospital and geriatric clinics in the Stockholm Region.


These results are important as information on the groups with the highest mortality, i.e. the very old and frail patients, is underrepresented. For example, obesity is a risk factor in COVID-19 infection in younger adults but we instead found that low BMI and malnutrition increased the risk of in-hospital mortality in geriatric COVID-19 patients who were mostly older than 75 years, says Ph.D. Laura Kananen, a researcher at the Department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics, KI.


__________________________________


Nursing homes misdiagnose and sedate residents with
 strong drugs but lag on vaccinating staff


The nation’s nursing homes, battered by the coronavirus pandemic, are under more fire for their resurgent reliance on powerful and risky psychiatric drugs and shaky diagnoses of mental illness to treat elderly residents, as well as for the institutions’ inability to safeguard the old, sick, and injured in their care by ensuring their staff are vaccinated against Covid-19.



Facilities across the country have recorded a 70% spike in dubious designations of elderly residents as schizophrenic. This means they may be dosed with potent antipsychotic drugs, which, critics say, act akin to pharmaceutical restraints and can reduce the vulnerable to near vegetative states, the New York Times reported, based on its investigation of the issue.

The newspaper noted that federal regulators and mental health professionals have campaigned for years to get nursing homes and other long-term care facilities to stop using certain medications, which once were more routinely administered and pack more than a wallop for the old:


___________________________________


Why Older Adults Are at Risk for
 Severe Breakthrough COVID​​

By Rachel Nania


The coronavirus vaccines are still working extremely well, research shows, even in the era of the dangerous delta variant. Unvaccinated individuals are more than 10 times as likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 and more than 10 times as likely to die from the disease as vaccinated people, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).



But on the rare occasion that a vaccinated person does fall seriously ill with COVID-19 — it’s happened to about 0.008 percent of the 176 million fully vaccinated Americans — it’s likely to be an older adult. About 70 percent of breakthrough infections that have required hospitalization have been in adults 65 and older, the latest CDC data shows. This population also accounts for 87 percent of breakthrough deaths.


A study recently published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases mirrors the CDC’s findings: The median age of a small group of seriously ill, yet fully vaccinated, patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at the Yale New Haven Health System between March and July was 80.5 years. Another paper, yet to be peer reviewed, tracks similar trends.


_____________________________________


77% of Assisted Living Providers
 Say Staffing Crisis Getting Worse

By Tim Regan

It’s no secret that staffing challenges have long plagued the senior living industry, but a new survey shows many operators believe those headwinds have intensified in recent months.


More than three quarters of assisted living providers — 77% — said their overall workforce situation has gotten “much worse” or “somewhat worse” since June, according to a new survey from the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL).

The survey results, released Wednesday and based on responses from nearly 1,200 nursing homes and assisted living providers, lend more evidence to the fact that the senior living industry is in the midst of a historic staffing crisis, and one that shows no sign of letting up any time soon.





-///-





Older Americans faced more financial challenges
during Covid than in other wealthy nations

By Lauren Aratani
Read more  >>  https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/sep/15/older-americans-financial-challenges-covid
____________________________________________________________

41% of Americans say it’s ‘going to take
a miracle’ to be ready for retirement

By Jessica Dickler
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/14/36percent-of-americans-say-they-wont-have-enough-to-retire-report-finds.html
____________________________________________________________

Decluttering or Curating?
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/feng-shui-decluttering/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=8f91f6e3b4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_09_09_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-8f91f6e3b4-165407981&mc_cid=8f91f6e3b4&mc_eid=94767a79b9
____________________________________________________________

Could Cheaper, Over-the-Counter
Hearing Aids Finally Be Here?

Read more  >>  https://consumer.healthday.com/8-18-why-is-fda-stalling-on-sale-of-cheaper-sleeker-hearing-aids-2654599025.html
____________________________________________________________

Hindsight is 2020: COVID-19's effects on older adults
Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/guest-columns/hindsight-is-2020-covid-19s-effects-on-older-adults/
_____________________________________________________________

Dementia: The sensation when you stand up
that could indicate you're at risk

By Solen Le Net
Read more  >>  https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1493143/dementia-risk-factor-low-blood-pressure
_____________________________________________________________

Authorities Are Warning About Medicare Scam Targeting Seniors
But it’s a scam, according to the AARP.

Read more  >>  https://miami.cbslocal.com/2021/09/15/medicare-scam-targeting-seniors/
_____________________________________________________________

Older Adults Remain Underrepresented
in Cancer Clinical Trials

Read more  >>  https://www.docwirenews.com/urban-health-today/older-adults-remain-underrepresented-in-cancer-clinical-trials/
_____________________________________________________________

How to Maximize Your Social Security
By Justin Brock
Read more  >>  https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/380946
_____________________________________________________________

Study: Medicare reduces older adults' risk
 for catastrophic health expenses

By Brian P. Dunleavy
Read more  >>  https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/09/10/Medicare-older-adults-out-of-pocket-study/8361631284142/
_____________________________________________________________

Regulators expected to OK Pfizer boosters
for older Americans this week

By Michael Erman
Read more  >>  https://wincountry.com/2021/09/20/regulators-expected-to-ok-pfizer-boosters-for-older-americans-this-week/
___________________________________________________________

Don’t File For Medicaid Too Soon!
Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/don-t-file-for-medicaid-too-soon-1763325/
_______________________________________________________________

Democrats are holding the first hearing in 23 years
on a measure to lift the elderly and disabled out of poverty

By Ayelet Sheffey
Read more  >>  https://www.businessinsider.com/supplemental-security-income-improvements-gets-hearing-in-senate-finance-2021-9
_______________________________________________________________

AT&T announces end to 411 directory,
worrying some seniors

By Austen Erblat
Read more  >>  https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-ne-att-411-directory-ending-20210921-aci35ceixfdkxlfhyiwpyvqzai-story.html
_____________________________________________________________________

Sleep Disturbance Common, Tied to Pain,
Depression in Older Adults
Read more  >>  https://consumer.healthday.com/sleep-disturbances-common-tied-to-pain-depression-in-older-adults-2654960502.html





7 Notes of Encouragement
as You Simplify Your Life


If you are trying to simplify your life, you’ve probably discovered that it’s not an overnight adventure.



I’ve accepted that I will be simplifying for a lifetime. That realization has removed a lot of pressure to “get there” or to “do it the best way” and allowed me to turn my focus to enjoying it instead of finishing it.


If you are realizing this journey is more than decluttering and that simplicity takes time, these notes of encouragement will help you continue to simplify your life.





FYI





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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, September 23, 2021









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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021


Regulators expected to OK Pfizer boosters
 for older Americans this week

By Michael Erman


 U.S. regulators are expected to authorize a third booster shot of the Pfizer Inc/BioNTech SE COVID-19 vaccine for older and some high-risk Americans early this week in time for the government to roll them out by Friday as hoped.



The Food and Drug Administration is expected to give the nod to the shots for at least this group in the days ahead of a meeting of advisers to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scheduled for Wednesday afternoon. The CDC panel will discuss more precise recommendations for how the shots will be administered.


On Friday, an FDA advisory committee voted to recommend emergency authorization of the additional Pfizer shots for Americans 65 and older and those at high risk of severe illness.


________________________________________


Don’t File For Medicaid Too Soon!

Most people assume that they will age in place at home and never need long-term care, but statistics show that that is not the case.  Medicare may be available to pay for a limited period of care under limited circumstances, but if an individual does not have long-term care insurance, nursing home care can cost more than $12,000 per month in New Jersey.  And that is only the average monthly cost of care; many facilities charge a higher rate.  That translates to at least $144,000, which is an awful lot of money to pay out-of-pocket.  That is why many seniors who can no longer remain at home turn to Medicaid, which is a joint federal and state public benefits program, to help fund their care in a nursing home or an assisted living facility.


As part of the process of transitioning from hospital care to long-term care, you will probably be asked whether you have filed a Medicaid application. This is a routine part of the long-term care admissions process.  It is very important to avoid filing for Medicaid before it is needed, for at least two reasons.








______________________________________


Democrats are holding the first hearing in 23 years
 on a measure to lift the elderly and disabled out of poverty

By Ayelet Sheffey

  
For the first time in over two decades, a critical benefit for the low-income elderly and severely disabled is getting a hearing in the Senate.


The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program provides monthly checks to nearly 8 million Americans who have a disability or are over the age of 65 and are low-income. The maximum federal SSI benefit of $794 per month is $279 below the federal poverty level and some Democrats want to lift it higher.

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, who reintroduced the Supplemental Security Income Restoration Act in June, is leading Tuesday's hearing of the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Social Security, Pensions, and Family Policy to discuss improvements to the program.

The last time Senate held a hearing on the issue was in 1998, when monthly SSI payments were $494, which fell below the Dept. of Health and Human Services poverty guidelines even at the time.


______________________________________________


AT&T announces end to 411 directory,
 worrying some seniors

By Austen Erblat

Telecom giant AT&T is hanging up on its 411 directory assistance for cellphone users — and some seniors are feeling short-changed.



The service will bow out starting Monday, Nov. 1, but will still be available for AT&T landlines.


Some older AT&T customers who may not know how to use a computer, no longer have a landline or can’t read the text in a phone book now worry they won’t be able to use a service they feel they’ve paid into for decades.



______________________________________________

Sleep Disturbance Common, Tied to Pain,
Depression in Older Adults


Sleep disturbance in older adults is associated with physical pain and depression, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.



Li-Chuan Tsai, R.N., from the China Medical University Beigang Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues assessed depression, sleep quality, and physical pain among 120 older adults (aged >65 years) with chronic disease.

The researchers found that the average Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score was 5.67, with nearly half of participants (45.8 percent) having sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance was significantly more likely among older adults who were living with a partner and those who urinated at night. There was an association observed for the presence of sleep disturbance with greater levels of depression and higher levels of physical pain.







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It’s Wednesday, September 22, 2021




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SEPTEMBER 22, 2021




“I don't believe in frettin' and grievin'
Why mess around with strife?
I never was cut out to step and strut out
Give me the simple life
Some find it pleasant dining on pheasant
Those things roll off my knife
Just serve me tomatoes and mashed potatoes
Give me the simple life
A cottage small is all I'm after
Not one that's spacious and wide
A home that rings with joy and laughter
And the ones you love inside
Some like the high road, I like the low road
Free from the grief and strife
Sounds corny and seedy, but, yes, indeedy
Give me the simple life” 
[1]



A friend of mine, whom I have known for over 30 years, just celebrated her 64th birthday. And, while trying to think of something witty to say to her on her Facebook page, my mind went back to a time when things were happier. A time when I was younger, doing well and feeling well. A time of great enjoyment for me. Time spent with people I loved. A simpler life.
 
A friend of mine, whom I have known for over 30 years, just celebrated her 64th birthday. And, while trying to think of something witty to say to her on her Facebook page, my mind went back to a time when things were happier. A time when I was doing well and felt well. A time of great enjoyment for me. Time spent with people I loved. A simpler life.

 
I have never asked for much out of life. Money was important to me only so far as it put a roof over my head and food on the table. I drove a modest car and dressed neatly and simply. My home was a small two-bedroom cape in a nice middle class neighborhood on Long Island. Itself a bastion of simplicity. Beyond that, my requirements were few. There was no need for “fancy”, “extravagant,” or expensive. My indulgence, and that of my wife, was having nice dinners with friends. Dinners filled with laughter and good cheer, good food and good wine.
 
Those dinners weren’t fancy. We ate in neighborhood restaurants where the owners knew us and didn’t mind if we lingered a little too long over dessert and another bottle of a nice Bordeaux or Chablis. Good times that I dearly miss.

The years have not been kind to that simple life for me. I’ll never have that again. Divorce, financial downturns, illness and death have spoiled most of what I once enjoyed. The house, car, wife and friends are gone or moved away. I can no longer even have a glass of wine for fear that drinking it could cause a conflict with one pill in a cornucopia of pharmaceuticals I take every day. And those dinners? They have been reduced to three meals-a-day in the ALF dining room where lingering is frowned upon and nothing stronger than cranberry juice is served. And, while I like the people I eat with, they are not the people I loved and laughed with. That simple, decent life I once knew has been reduced to a world of surgical appliances, medications, doctors’ appointments, forms to be filled-out and people I don’t know (and trust even less) controlling my life. A life complicated with rules, regulations and protocols devised by a bureaucracy whose very existence depends on not being simple. ………………….

 
[1] lyrics. “Give me the simple life” Ella Fitzgerald version, written by Harry Ruby / Rube Bloom © Warner Chappell Music, Inc




Dementia: The sensation when you stand up
that could indicate you're at risk

By Solen Le Net


Dementia is a condition typified by memory loss beyond what is to be expected as a consequence of ageing. The condition is characterised by clumps of toxic protein in the brain, that prevent brain cells from communicating with one another. A lack of effective treatment to cure dementia has fuelled the search for early characterisation of the condition. One side, when you stand up, could signal you’re at risk.


Orthostatic hypotension is a form of low blood pressure characterised by the failure of blood vessels to constrict when the body takes an upright condition.


A drop in blood pressure reduces blood flow to the brain, causing feelings of light-headedness and dizziness.




___________________________________________


Authorities Are Warning About Medicare Scam Targeting Seniors


With the pandemic on everyone’s mind, especially seniors, scammers are now preying on people concerned about their health and Medicare coverage.

Seniors across the country are receiving robocalls that claim to be from Medicare.



Some calls are from people claiming to be a “patient advocates,” giving warnings like: “If you do not act soon, then Medicare may label you as ineligible for coverage.”

But it’s a scam, according to the AARP. The fake calls have hit more than 60 million Americans.





______________________________________________


Older Adults Remain Underrepresented
 in Cancer Clinical Trials


Older adults were underrepresented in a large sample of cancer clinical trials, according to a recent study.


The researchers looked at data from more than 1,200 individual studies conducted by the Alliance for Clinical Trials on Oncology group. They included 237 suitable studies for this analysis, including 66,708 patients; the median age of trial participants was 60 years.


Each trial’s expected percent of participants aged 65 or older was calculated using data from the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) database. On average, the expected percentage of participants aged 65 or older was higher than the actual percentage enrolled (58% vs. 39%; P<0.0001). For hematology trials the average expected rate would be 53%, whereas the actual enrollment percentage was 37%.


_____________________________________________


How to Maximize Your Social Security
By Justin Brock


Social Security is the backbone of the average retirement income. Social Security is available to anyone who has paid taxes for 10 years, and when you reach the minimum retirement agent of 62, you may file to receive these benefits. Also, you can receive Social Security Disability payments early if you have a medical issue that Social Security deems worthy of activating (this form of income is referred to as an SSDI.) There is definitely a conundrum with deciding when to draw upon your Social Security funds and when to delay. It can be tempting to draw as soon as eligible, but some nuances can change the decision when factored in.


When considering when to retire, remember: The longer you work, the better. Your benefits are based on the average income of your 35 highest paid working years. Since most people's income goes up as they get older, working longer can really increase this average. If there is one trick to boost this portion of your income, this is it. Unfortunately, it also requires working when many people are sick and tired of doing just that.


Full Retirement Age (FRA) is based on your birthday. There is a chart that can easily help you decide what your FRA is here. When someone starts Social Security early at age 62, your reduction of total benefit can reach as much as 30%. This can be a huge loss for someone. In addition, 8% a year past FRA can be added to your Social Security income by postponing further all the way until age 70.


______________________________________________


Study: Medicare reduces older adults' risk
 for catastrophic health expenses

By Brian P. Dunleavy


Older adults' out-of-pocket healthcare expenses drop by 27% once they enroll in Medicare, improving their protection from financial risk, a study published Friday by JAMA Health Forum found.


This is despite a 5% increase in annual medical expenses accrued after turning age 65, the data showed.


And although nearly 9% of adults age 64 experienced "catastrophic" health expenses -- or costs exceeding 40% of annual income minus spending on food and housing -- enrolling in Medicare, usually at age 65, reduced their risk for these financial problems by 35%, the researchers said.






MPs approve scrapping pensions triple lock
 this year in Tory manifesto breach

By Dan Bloom


MPs backed the second reading of the Social Security (Uprating Of Benefits) Bill, the legal mechanism to scrap the pensions triple lock next year to avoid an unintended 8% rise


Tory MPs have officially backed scrapping the pensions triple lock in a Commons vote that breaches the party's own manifesto.


MPs tonight voted 300-55 for the second reading of a Bill that will legally cancel the promise for pension rises next April.


A final vote on the third reading of the Social Security (Uprating Of Benefits) Bill was expected to pass later tonight.










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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, September 21, 2021






SEPTEMBER 21, 2021


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During Falls Prevention Awareness Week,
 NCOA Reminds Older Adults to Check their Risk


The National Council on Aging (NCOA), the national voice for every person's right to age well, is proud to join thousands of community-based organizations for Falls Prevention Awareness Week, September 20-24, 2021. NCOA and its partners are encouraging every older adult to complete a Falls Free CheckUp to quickly and easily assess their risk of falling and take steps to reduce that risk.


NCOA is encouraging all older adults to complete an easy Falls Free CheckUp to assess their risk of falling.

"Annual checkups are an important way to stay healthy as we age—and that includes checking your risk of falling every year," said Ramsey Alwin, NCOA President & CEO. "Our Falls Free CheckUp makes it easy. Just answer 12 questions, and you will get a personalized report identifying your potential risk—plus easy steps you can take right away to address it. The checkup is also available in Spanish as the Chequeo Contra Caídas."


______________________________________________


America’s Remaining Unvaccinated Seniors
By Jim Geraghty


The percentage of Americans who are vaccinated is probably higher than you think, and the group of Americans who are at risk to succumbing to COVID-19 remain those who are at least in their mid 40s, if not senior citizens, and those who have health risks due to high blood pressure and diabetes. We would be much better off focusing all of our efforts on getting shots into those remaining high-risk Americans instead of pressuring companies to fire healthy 20-somethings who are vaccine-hesitant.

America’s Vaccination Standings



As of this morning, 93.2 percent of American’s senior citizens have at least one shot, 76.5 percent of American adults have at least one shot, 74.6 percent of all eligible Americans — those twelve and up — have at least one shot, and 63.8 percent of all Americans have one shot.

Some people prefer to measure our vaccination efforts by the percentage of demographic groups that are fully vaccinated, which is usually about ten percentage points lower. But as of July, one dose of Pfizer or Moderna is at least 80 percent effective against symptomatic infection, and close to 100 percent effective against hospitalization and death. Those who get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after the shot. If we could get everyone in America who is eligible to take just one dose, we would be in really great shape against this virus.


_________________________________________


New workout promises to improve balance
 and prevents falls in older Americans

By BARBARA MORSE


A new workout is promising to improve balance and prevents falls in older Americans.



It's called Tai Ji Quan and two times a week, this class is held at Tockwotton on the Waterfront Senior Living Community.

"When we know it's Tuesday and Thursday, we say, 'Oh, boy. I don't know if I should go'," said Carmela LaSalvia, who is known as Millie to her friends.




_________________________________________________


Over 60? Stop Doing This Now, Say Experts
BY Dr. Quratulain “Annie” Syed

These mistakes can take years off your life.


Turned 60 this year? Congratulations! You're entering the best decade of your life. Your 60s are a decade that will bring you some freedom from your worldly duties and give you the opportunity to pursue passions you put on hold while managing your full-time family and work responsibilities. As a geriatrician, I like to tell my patients that their newfound freedom does, however, come with its own set of responsibilities. If this decade of your life has a theme, I recommend making it self-care. Investment in your physical and mental health and stopping certain behaviors and habits during your 60s will give you enormous rewards in the decades ahead. I give my own patients the following advice. Read on to learn what it is—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID.


"Excessive dietary salt intake has been linked to elevated blood pressure in research studies. Additionally, older adults are more sensitive to blood pressure fluctuations with dietary salt intake, including reduction in blood pressure with dietary salt reduction. As elevated blood pressure is a risk for heart attacks and strokes, please do yourself a favor and get rid of the salt shaker from your dining room table," says Dr. Syed.


____________________________________________


7 Senior Dating Tips
By Kimberly Johnson


First, It’s Not About Luck

If you’re still throwing darts at online dating profiles, consulting your horoscope, thinking that finding a partner is just a numbers game, or hoping a friend will fix you up, then you’ve already missed the senior dating boat. If you wait for your online dating site inbox to fill up instead of being proactive, if you only answer emails from men or women who fit a narrow type, or you haven’t refreshed your photos or updated your profile in six months, you need to know that the effort required to meet a life partner begins when you sign up and ends only when you’re in love.

No Whining


While online dating for seniors isn’t a contact sport, it sometimes leaves seniors feeling bruised on the inside. Face it, you’re competing with every senior dater in your community, and you need to act accordingly. Complaining there aren’t enough good men, that the available men are abysmal, that women only want to date a wallet, and a zillion other nonsensical judgments will only ensure you quit online dating frustrated and single. You’ll need equal amounts of stamina, determination, and intelligence.









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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, September 20, 2021





SEPTEMBER 20, 2021


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Israeli study finds COVID booster shot
 increases protection elevenfold for older people

By Ido Efrati


Coronavirus vaccine booster shots increase protection from infection over tenfold in those over 60, according to an Israeli study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.



The study used data on 1.14 million Israelis aged 60 and up who had received two doses of the vaccine by the end of August. It divided cases into two groups: one consisting of people who received two doses of the vaccine, and another consisting of people who received a third dose. The researchers found that at least 12 days after the booster shot, the rate of infection in the non-booster group was 11.4 higher than the booster group, while their rate of severe illness was 19.5 times higher.

The peer-reviewed study was authored by 11 researchers, including Health Ministry director general Nachman Ash and Israel’s director of public health services, Dr. Sharon Alroy-Preis. They used several statistical methods and wrote that they had attempted to account as much as possible for variables such as behavioral differences and differences between different demographic populations.


________________________________________


Medicare to repeal medical device rule
 pushed by Trump administration

By Bob Herman

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is proposing to kill a regulation the agency finalized earlier this year under the Trump administration that would have required Medicare to pay for any medical device deemed as a "breakthrough" by the FDA.


Driving the news: After receiving public feedback, CMS determined the rule was "not in the best interest of Medicare beneficiaries because the rule may provide coverage without adequate evidence that the breakthrough device would be a reasonable and necessary treatment."

Between the lines: The rule would have been a gift to the medical device industry, which supported the rule.




___________________________________________________________


What the Bob Ross Estate Fight
 Can Teach Business Owners



The new, buzzy Netflix documentary on the late, beloved, iconic public broadcasting TV host, painter Bob Ross — "Bob Ross: Happy Accidents, Betrayal and Greed" — documents how the artist's son, Steve, now 55, was allegedly robbed of his late father's inheritance by the artist's business partners. It's worth watching for anyone but offers particular cautionary lessons for business owners that could help them avoid making inheritance mistakes and protect their legacy.



The documentary, produced by actress and writer Melissa McCarthy and her husband, filmmaker and actor Ben Falcone, shows how Ross' business partners Annette and Walt Kowalski profited from the painter's talents and reputation by taking control of his name, image and likeness.

The Story of Bob Ross Inc.

Today, the Kowalskis fully profit from sales of Bob Ross paint brushes, paint tubes and other materials; Bob Ross paintings sometimes sell for $8,000 to $10,000 online....


___________________________________________


Scammers on Match Steal Millions
By Katherine Skiba


Looking online for love? Be careful. After meeting suitors on Match.com, a well-known dating site, victims across the U.S. have lost upward of hundreds of thousands of dollars to these criminals who pose as perfect partners.


When online dating descends into a big fat con, the emotional and financial wallop can be devastating, and older Americans are among those who have paid the price. It happens, as a top federal prosecutor in Oklahoma put it, to people looking for love, companionship and “a partner with whom to share their life.”


Consider the Utah woman, 81, who said she paid about $26 to subscribe to Match.com
earlier this year only to meet a con man. Urging her off the dating site to message each other through Google Hangouts and WhatsApp, he pursued her relentlessly. The 21st century Svengali hid behind an attractive photo and said he was a 64-year-old native of Copenhagen, Denmark, educated in the U.S. and the owner of a construction firm and a four-bedroom home in Oklahoma. He called her “sweetheart,” “babe,” and the “love of my life.” Saying he was retiring in November, he promised they’d marry and began addressing her as “my wife.”


_____________________________________


New workout promises to improve balance
 and prevents falls in older Americans

By BARBARA MORSE

A new workout is promising to improve balance and prevents falls in older Americans.



It's called Tai Ji Quan and two times a week, this class is held at Tockwotton on the Waterfront Senior Living Community.


"When we know it's Tuesday and Thursday, we say, 'Oh, boy. I don't know if I should go'," said Carmela LaSalvia, who is known as Millie to her friends.






3 Changes to Social Security You Probably Didn't Know About
The social safety net is changing before our eyes.

By Sam Swenson

Social Security has long been considered one of the pillars of a safe retirement. Along with pension income and a healthy nest egg, the program can be expected to cover at least a portion of your retirement costs. However, recent changes to Social Security have made the proposition a bit more tenuous. Future retirees will need to maximize each of those three sources of retirement income to ensure they're covered throughout their golden years.



Here, we'll look at three changes to Social Security you probably didn't know about.


1. Its trust reserves have a shorter life span
In the most recent update from the Social Security Administration, the outlook for its combined trust fund is said to have worsened since 2020. The combined fund is made up of two separate trusts: the OASI Trust Fund (for Old-Age and Survivors' Insurance) and the DI Trust Fund (for Disability Insurance)....











There are several reasons nearly 80 million Americans have refused to get any of the currently approved COVID-19 vaccinations. Vaccinations that have been proven to work and work well. Reasons which range anywhere from the religious to the absurd, with everything in between. Not the least political. Those idiots who are cutting off their noses to spite the Democrats. They believe they are being patriotic. And, in a way, they are. Eventually, many of them will be dead, leaving only sane people to get on with the business of governing our country. However, there is another group of people who will not get vaccinated only because they fear mockery or even being shunned by their relatives, friends and neighbors.


Remember when you were back in grade school and, heavens forbid, you dressed a little different from the way the rest of your classmates dressed and how you were mocked for it. Or, in a worst-case scenario, bullied? That’s exactly how some people who are well past their formative years are acting right now with vaccinations. Unfortunately, the consequences go far beyond the cloistered confines of a schoolhouse. Peer pressure, when it concerns whether to be vaccinated against a deadly disease, can be disastrous for our nation and humanity. Additionally, this “shaming” may not be only localized. Often it covers an entire state. And it comes from the top in the guise of freedom and independence.

Every time a governor of a state refuses to act upon a “mandate to vaccinate”, or the wearing of masks. Or even try to make it illegal to require vaccines in certain situations, and then tell this to people who are surrounded by others in their peer group who, for whatever reason won’t get vaccinated, they are playing to the base constituency who fear their freedoms and liberties are being compromised if they are required to show proof of vaccination to eat in a restaurant, shop at a mall or go to school.

Amazingly, there are people who have found a way around any conflict with peers. They have gone to other states or locations, away from where they might be spotted by someone they know, to be vaccinated. And they will go back to their neighbors and lie about it so as not to be excluded from the herd. I suppose that’s better than nothing, but it does little to keep a community safe. One would think those folks would have advanced beyond Junior High in their dealings with adults.
 
A noted physician was interviewed on TV the other day. He said something that should register with every American who has not been vaccinated. What he said was simple and profound. “Every unvaccinated person who died of the complications of the COVID-19 virus since January 1st, died needlessly and in great agony.” I don’t know what more has to be said……………………….
 






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SEPTEMBER 19, 2021


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Older Americans faced more financial challenges
during Covid than in other wealthy nations

By Lauren Aratani


O
lder Americans were more likely to suffer pandemic-related economic difficulties compared with older citizens of other wealthy countries, according to a new survey from the Commonwealth Fund.



In a survey taken by adults 65 and older in 11 of the world’s wealthiest nations, 19% of US adults reported using up all or most of their savings or losing sources of income during the pandemic – the highest percentage of any country. The percentage is nearly seven times higher than Germany, where 3% of older adults reported economic difficulties.

The gap was even more pronounced when the survey results were disaggregated by race. Latino and Black Americans had higher rates of economic difficulties compared with white Americans, with 39% of Latino Americans and 32% of Black Americans reporting hardships compared to 14% of White Americans.



______________________________________


41% of Americans say it’s ‘going to take
 a miracle’ to be ready for retirement

By Jessica Dickler


Retirement is looking less and less like a given, at least in the United States.



Overall, 59% of Americans said they accept that they will have to keep working longer, while 36% now believe that they will never have enough money to be able to retire, according to the latest data from the Natixis Global Retirement Index.  

Even more — roughly 41% — said their ability to be financially secure in retirement is “going to take a miracle,” the report found.
More from The New Road to Retirement:


___________________________________________


Decluttering or Curating?


By following principles of feng shui, rightsizing your home can help promote well-being



The COVID-19 quarantines have brought a new perspective about how we inhabit our spaces. Even as we venture forth into the "new normal," many of us will continue to spend more personal and work time at home.

Not surprisingly, during those long lockdown hours within our own four walls, many of us discovered that we were drowning in belongings – drawers, closets, rooms and garages – our homes filled to the brim.


_______________________________________


Could Cheaper, Over-the-Counter
 Hearing Aids Finally Be Here?



Until now, folks suffering from hearing loss typically have had to fork out thousands of dollars for a device that could be adjusted only by a professional audiologist.



No wonder that only one-quarter of the nearly 29 million U.S. adults who could benefit from a hearing aid have actually tried one, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.


Less costly high-tech, over-the-counter hearing devices are being developed, and some have even arrived on the market from companies like the speaker manufacturer Bose.


_________________________________________


Hindsight is 2020: COVID-19's effects on older adults


Nobody would deny that 2020 resulted in less-than-perfect health.


The effects on the senior population arguably have been the most significant. Isolation, fear and loss have had undeniable effects not only on older adults’ mental health, but also on their physical health. The sudden change to a sedentary lifestyle and a lack of preventive / maintenance care or attention to underlying medical conditions — such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity — created a rapid deconditioned state that worsened their current comorbidities and created new ones.

Naturally, as fear of hospitals and other medical facilities grew, avoidance of treatment followed, and a deterioration of organic disease states rapidly grew. Now that the immediate threat is subsiding due to vaccinations, the focus for older adult healthcare can be redirected to the management of chronic diseases and the removal of barriers that prevent a return to their previous, active lives.






How to Grieve for a Very Good Dog
By: W. Hodding Carter


If I had lost a human partner, there would have been the usual funeral rituals, and being an emotional basket case would have seemed understandable. But our culture treats the death of a pet more like the loss of an automobile. When it wears out, you should just go buy another one. Well-meaning friends and family members had advised this in their attempts to help me feel better. What they didn’t get was that I had lost a soul mate—an irreplaceable relationship—not a piece of property.



During our more than 15 years together, Sunny was faithfully by my side as I went through a bitter divorce, raised my son alone, dealt with caring for my mother and her dementia, and endured the death of my parents, as well as PTSD caused by childhood trauma, empty-nest syndrome when my son went to college, stressful jobs, scary health issues, moving to a new town where I knew no one and, of course, the COVID-19 lockdown.

Sunny was like a handrail along the edge of a thousand-foot cliff. Navigating life’s challenges seemed doable because I knew I could hold on to her if needed. Now the handrail was gone. Trying to understand why I was in such pain, I sought out a few experts, who explained to me what it is about these transitions that makes them so difficult.







Flu season is coming fast and could be miserable
By Erika Edwards
Read more  >>  https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/flu-season-coming-fast-miserable-studies-warn-rcna1909
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The ‘first’ symptom of dementia may not be memory loss
Read more  >>  https://newsnationusa.com/news/health/dementia-the-first-symptom-of-dementia-may-not-be-memory-loss-major-study-finding/
__________________________________________________________

At the End of Life, Some Are Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/vsed-option/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=42a07f3332-Tuesday_Newsletter_09_07_21_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-42a07f3332-165407981&mc_cid=42a07f3332&mc_eid=94767a79b9
________________________________________________________

How the Pandemic Worsened Mobility and Increased Falls
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/mobility-and-falls-pandemic/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=42a07f3332-Tuesday_Newsletter_09_07_21_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-42a07f3332-165407981&mc_cid=42a07f3332&mc_eid=94767a79b9
___________________________________________________________

Retired Seniors in U.S. Aren’t Covered
by Biden’s Vaccine Plan

By Jonathan Levin, Josh Wingrove
Read more  >>  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-11/retired-seniors-in-u-s-aren-t-covered-by-biden-s-vaccine-plan
________________________________________________________

Healthcare accounts not utilized by older adults
By Keith A. Reynolds
Read more  >>  https://www.medicaleconomics.com/view/healthcare-accounts-not-utilized-by-older-adults
________________________________________________________

Why the Cost of Long-Term Care Is
Out of Reach for the Middle Class

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/the-cost-of-long-term-care-is-out-of-reach-for-middle-income-earners/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=8f91f6e3b4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_09_09_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-8f91f6e3b4-165407981&mc_cid=8f91f6e3b4&mc_eid=94767a79b9
___________________________________________________________

Bogus diagnoses allow for high rates
 of drugging in nursing homes

By Ivana Saric
____________________________________________________

A Surprising Number of People Could See Their
 Monthly Social Security Benefit Rise

 $100 (or More) in 2022
__________________________________________________________

Rides, meals and more for seniors
 — just a phone call away

___________________________________________________________

Social Security & You:
 Social Security will not go broke

By TOM MARGENAU
____________________________________________________________

CDC updates assisted living guidance for
 face masks, testing, quarantine

____________________________________________________________

Chronic Kidney Disease May Be
 Overestimated in the Elderly

___________________________________________________________

You're 80 Percent More Likely
 to Have a Stroke at This Time

By Lauren Gray
___________________________________________________________

What The Villages Lacks:
An Aging Expert Explains Why He's Not a Fan

_________________________________________________________

The unsung importance of casual
 relationships for older adults

By Judith Graham
_______________________________________________________

Where you live could determine
 how long you stay independent

By Vanessa Misciagna
________________________________________________________





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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, September 16, 2021







SEPTEMBER 16, 2021




Nothing raises the blood pressure more than a bowl of salted peanuts here at the A.L.F. than a discussion about our dining situation. All aspects of it. From the service, the dinnerware and place-mats to the food itself. How and what is fed to us has always been a touchy subject. And rightly so.

For many residents, the dining room is the only place where they get to meet and interact with other residents. Not to mention partaking in the only meals most of them have all day. And it is the quality of those meals that often becomes the center of conversation both in and out of the dining room.

 
Each month for as long as I remember, we have held a meeting with our food service manager. These meetings (chaired and arranged by our resident food committee) are held once-a-month and are open to all residents. It is the one time residents, as a group, can meet, question, praise and complain about what goes on in the dining room. And the recent meeting held this past Tuesday was no exception.

Frankly, the food has not been very good here, and it became worse during and after our over 16 month pandemic lockdown.

The food was so bad; the facility was forced to fire the existing food service manager and hunt for a new one. Not an easy task. The job is thankless and difficult. The candidate must not only deal with a staff of poorly trained, underpaid servers and cooks, a food budget not much higher than that of a penal institution,  but a group of the grumpiest, most unappreciative, surly diners as well. Amazingly, they di manage to find someone who was willing to do the job. And this week we had our second meeting with him.

The previous meeting was a month ago. Just days after he was hired. He told us that if we gave him a month, things would change. I am happy to report; he kept his promise. Somewhat.
 
Long-time residents here have become accustomed to the rhetoric and to take anything anybody says with a grain of salt. But this time was different. Some meals that heretofore have been just awful suddenly became quite good. Notably among them was a dish of eggplant parmesan. Past efforts resulted in a dry, over-cooked, over-breaded and under-cheesed mess. It tasted nothing like the dish was supposed to taste. But what was set before us last week was, and I’m not exaggerating, restaurant quality. And a roasted chicken dish served the next afternoon was of equal quality. A very encouraging start.

 
The service has improved too. More servers doing their jobs the right way. A result of proper training. Most likely because of our new manager having 35 years in the catering and restaurant business.

Is everything perfect? No. And it’s not likely to ever be so. There are just too many variables and barriers to contend with. Budget and the ability to keep staff among them. However, after what we have been subjected to these past months (which can only be described as “criminal”) any improvement would be considered a godsend. Personally, I’m looking forward to the next weeks and months if only to see what’s new. We have been promised such dishes as BBQ ribs and chicken parmesan. Meals that used to be favorites here and somehow were removed from the menu. At the very least, it will be interesting to see how the promises are followed through. As I said, we’ve seen this before…………
 
 


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You're 80 Percent More Likely
 to Have a Stroke at This Time

By Lauren Gray


A stroke occurs when the blood supply to your brain is blocked, stopping oxygen and nutrients from reaching your brain tissue and ultimately killing brain cells. Every forty seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke, and every four minutes, someone dies from it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Of course, these numbers represent averages, not actual medical emergencies occurring evenly throughout the day. In fact, research shows that the distribution is more uneven than you might think: you're 80 percent more likely to have a stroke during one time of day compared with all the others.

Becoming aware of the riskiest hours for stroke could help you connect the dots to recognize the symptoms sooner. Being extra vigilant to warning signs during those hours—numbness or weakness on one side of the body, confusion, speech or vision problems, dizziness, or a severe headache with no known cause—could literally save your life. Read on to find out when you're most likely to have a stroke, and what you can do to slash your risk!


__________________________________________


Population of older Americans tops young children for first time


For the first time in the United States, there are more older adults than young children.


“The first of the Baby Boomers turned 65 in 2011,” said Kansas State University specialist in aging Erin Yelland. “So, the oldest of the Baby Boomers are just now turning 75, which means that this population is going to continue to rapidly grow.”

Older Americans – those age 65 and up – have topped 54 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, experiencing rapid growth over the past 10 years. The youngest age group – those age 5 and younger – has remained mostly flat in the U.S. and is estimated at just under 20 million.


__________________________________________


What The Villages Lacks:
An Aging Expert Explains Why He's Not a Fan



The chairman of the Center for the Future of Aging's concerns about this type of 55+ community

We learned from the 2020 U.S. Census that the fastest growing metro area in the nation is The Villages, a master-planned retirement community in central Florida. In a demographically changing and urbanizing America, this dominantly white, politically conservative stronghold bucked the trend as retirees lured by warm winters, pastel-hued homes, golf carts and pickleball courts flocked in.


We are all free to choose how and where we want to live, of course, and new housing solutions for the rapidly growing population of older Americans are needed. But to be honest, if communities like The Villages represent the future of aging, please count me and many of us out.





____________________________________________


The unsung importance of casual
 relationships for older adults

By Judith Graham


“Hi there!” he called out to customers at a gas station where he’d stopped on his way to the airport. “How’s your day going?” he asked the Transportation Security Administration agent who checked his ID. “Isn’t this wonderful?” he exclaimed to guests at the wedding, most of whom were strangers.


“I was striking up conversations with people I didn’t know everywhere I went,” said Keenan, 65, who retired in December as chief executive officer of the Illinois Academy of Family Physicians. “Even if they just grunted at me, it was a great day.”

It wasn’t only close friends Keenan missed seeing during 15 months of staying home and trying to avoid COVID-19. It was also dozens of casual acquaintances and people he ran into at social events, restaurants, church and other venues.


____________________________________________


Where you live could determine
 how long you stay independent

By Vanessa Misciagna

Think about your address, your zip code. Maybe you’re there because you moved for work, or your family has never known another one, or maybe you're there because you had no where else to go.


Of all the factors that determine it, your zip code may actually be a major factor in how long you live independently.


"Like many studies, one finding leads to another leads to another," said Dr. Thomas Gill, geriatrician and professor at Yale.










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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, September 15, 2021






SEPTEMBER 15, 2021





It’s been a while since I’ve done any real exercise. Okay, I DID NO REAL EXERCISE. The thought of staying in one place, stretching, bending, and lifting for no apparent reason at all, is something I wanted no part of. And for those people who went to a gym or fitness center just to hop on a treadmill or worse, a stationary bicycle and go nowhere, well, that’s just crazy. And besides, why would I want to pay for a membership when I can walk for free? And what better place to walk than in the world’s most walk-able city, New York. That’s why, whenever I could, instead of driving or taking public transportation, I would walk. It would not be unusual to find me, early on a Sunday morning, walking from the tip of Manhattan Island to Central Park (a journey of about 5 miles). Or the length of Central Park (3 miles) and back. That was my exercise. It was low impact and educational. There were at least 7 museums, two zoos, and a variety of historic sites along the way. All for the cost  of a subway ride. But that was a long time ago, in a different life. A life I no longer have.


Age and illness have taken their toll. Months of inactivity all but crippled me. Fortunately, I could fight back and, after years of physical and occupational therapy, I regained some of what I lost. But not nearly enough to get me to where I need to be. And so, I recently began another round of PT here at the ALF. And guess what? I’m doing exactly the things I hated years ago.
 
The last two sessions found me, not only on a stationary bicycle-like device, but on an honest-to-goodness treadmill too. Oh, the humanity.


Amazingly, I could go for 10 minutes on the bicycle and 5 minutes on the treadmill at 1.2 mph. Now, that may not seem like a big deal to you, but to me, it’s a frigging’ marathon. And don’t think I don’t feel it. The “burn” that is.
 
According to vmfit.com…’’There are two types of “burning” you’re feeling when you exercise: muscular overload and localized muscular fatigue. The former happens when you exert more effort than your muscles have the capacity for, like lifting heavy. The latter happens when a muscle group gets tired, which differs from being overloaded.”

 
It is the latter (localized muscular fatigue) that got to me midway into my “walk” on the treadmill. But I did not stop. Not that I did not want to, but I knew that to stop would mean I was conceding to my weakness. Giving in to the pain. A personal failure. I pushed through the burn and completed my 5 minute goal. Maybe I’ll pay for it tonight or tomorrow. But I’ll know I accomplished something. I’m just glad the “torture” sessions are only 30 to 40 minutes long.

Because of the Jewish holidays I will miss my next two sessions. I’ll try to do more walking on my own. After all, “no pain, no gain.”…….

 






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CDC updates assisted living guidance for
 face masks, testing, quarantine



Assisted living communities should follow the same infection prevention and control procedures as retirement and independent living communities in most cases, according to updated federal guidance related to the coronavirus.



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s changes focus on source control (face masks), SARS-CoV-2 testing and quarantine for fully vaccinated residents.

The CDC now recommends that assisted living communities follow the guidance for retirement communities and independent living — for the most part. When healthcare is being delivered, however — including by home health agencies or by staff members in the case of a COVID-positive resident — assisted living communities should follow the recommendations for nursing homes, the agency said.


_____________________________________________


Chronic Kidney Disease May Be
 Overestimated in the Elderly



Current chronic kidney disease (CKD) definitions that do not consider age-related estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline may inflate the burden of CKD in the elderly, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine.


Ping Liu, Ph.D., from the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and colleagues compared the outcomes associated with CKD defined by a fixed versus an age-adapted eGFR threshold. The analysis included administrative and laboratory data from adults with incident CKD from April 1, 2009, to March 31, 2017 (127,132 in the fixed cohort and 81,209 in the age-adapted cohort). The fixed eGFR threshold was 60 mL/min/1.73 m² versus thresholds of 75, 60, and 45 mL/min/1.73 m² for age younger than 40 years, 40 to 64 years, and 65 years and older, respectively.

The researchers found that the fixed-threshold cohort had lower risks for kidney failure (1.7 versus 3.0 percent at five years) and death (21.9 versus 25.4 percent) compared with the age-adapted cohort. Among 54,342 people ages 65 years and older with baseline eGFR of 45 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m² and normal/mild albuminuria who were in the fixed-threshold cohort only, five-year risks for kidney failure and death were similar to those of non-CKD controls, with a risk for kidney failure of ≤0.12 percent in both groups across all age categories. Further, the risk for death in this group was 69 times higher than the risk for kidney failure at age 65 to 69 years, 122 times higher at age 70 to 74 years, 279 times higher at age 75 to 79 years, and 935 times higher at age 80 years and older.


_____________________________________________


Ten Films Revolving Around Seniors and What Life Brings:
 From 'The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel' to 'The Duke'

By Brigid Brown

Some of our favorite actors are in their 60s and 70s (and climbing). They've not only lived a lot of life, and produced a lot of work, they also portray characters depicting what it's like for someone to reach their senior years.



Like, in The Duke, starring Jim Broadbent and Helen Mirren as pensioners, which comes out on September 17.

Based on a true story, Broadbent portrays a retired taxi driver who isn't okay with how retirees are being treated. As a form of protest, he steals a famous painting from The National Gallery, a portrait of the Duke of Wellington, holds it hostage and politely demands rights for senior citizens. Mirren portrays his devoted, yet concerned, wife, wishing she knew what he had been up to.


_______________________________________


Assisted Living vs. Nursing Homes:
 Which Is Right For You?

By Dawnielle Robinson-Walker

When it comes to residential care facilities for seniors, “nursing home” is often the umbrella term used to describe both assisted living and nursing homes. However, these facilities are not the same.



Assisted living communities help residents with activities of daily living (ADLs) while nursing homes provide seniors with 24-hour monitoring and high-level medical care. Learning more about the various features and benefits of assisted living and nursing homes can help you determine the right fit for you or an aging loved one.

More than 800,000 Americans reside in assisted living communities, which offer a safe, long-term residential setting for active seniors who can no longer live on their own. Residents may be able to choose from private, individual studios with kitchenettes and shared apartments for friends and couples. And while these senior residents don’t require 24/7 skilled nursing care, help with daily living tasks (such as getting dressed and using the bathroom) and medication management is available if needed.









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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, September 14, 2021







SEPTEMBER 14, 2021

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Bogus diagnoses allow for high rates
 of drugging in nursing homes

By Ivana Saric


Loopholes regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia and two other conditions have allowed these powerful drugs to proliferate in understaffed nursing homes, a New York Times investigation revealed.


Why it matters: Antipsychotics are so powerful that they have been referred to as "chemical straitjackets," and can pose increased risk of death for elderly patients with dementia.


The big picture: Because antipsychotics are so powerful and potentially dangerous, the federal government requires that nursing homes report how many of their patients are being treated with the powerful drugs, the Times noted.


_________________________________________


A Surprising Number of People Could See Their
 Monthly Social Security Benefit Rise
 $100 (or More) in 2022



Whether you're in your 60s and readying to hang up your work coat for good or just entering the workforce, there's a good chance that Social Security will play a key role in your retirement.


According to an April-released survey from U.S. national pollster Gallup, just 15% of nonretirees don't believe they'll need a cent from Social Security to make ends meet during retirement. By comparison, 38% of respondents expect it to be a "major" source of income. That's the highest percentage considering Social Security as a major source of income since this survey began 20 years ago.

Because Social Security is so vital to the financial well-being of seniors, disabled people, and even the survivors of deceased workers, there's arguably no announcement that's more anticipated each year than the October cost-of-living adjustment (COLA).


___________________________________________


Rides, meals and more for seniors
 — just a phone call away



Navigating the complex world of technology can be hard enough for young people, let alone for homebound older adults. GoGoGrandparent strives to change that.



In advance of Grandparents’ Day this past Sunday, Sept. 12, Justin Boogaard, CEO and founder of the platform that offers rides, groceries and other services for older adults, shed some light on the inspiration behind his business.

“It’s empowering older adults and people with disabilities to get what they want when they want, and we can be used as an extension of a care team,” he said.


____________________________________________


Social Security & You:
 Social Security will not go broke

By TOM MARGENAU

Social Security & You: Social Security will not go broke



Here we go again. Another round of scare stories about the impending doom of Social Security. Headlines, such as this one in my local newspaper — “Social Security moves closer to bankruptcy” — have many of my readers on edge.

These kinds of headlines were prompted by a report released last week from the Social Security Board of Trustees that said the nation’s bedrock social insurance program is one year closer to insolvency. It said that if no changes are made to the program by 2034, the system would be unable to pay full benefits. That’s one year earlier than the 2035 date in last year’s report.


___________________________________________


Fourth stimulus check a must for seniors
 despite Social Security bump, league says

By Sigrid Forberg



Though pleas for a fourth stimulus check have yet to die down, Washington seems to have lost interest in the idea of another universal cash handout.




Yet one advocacy group is hoping lawmakers will at least issue $1,400 checks to some of the nation’s most vulnerable: seniors.


The nonpartisan Senior Citizens League says that, while Social Security is poised for a big bump next year, it won’t be nearly enough to keep food on the table.










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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, September 13, 2021





SEPTEMBER 13, 2021





Jury Duty

It’s been over 20 years since I last received a NOTICE FOR JURY DUTY. Therefore, you can imagine my surprise when, along with a Land’s End catalog and a membership offer from the AARP, a red and white envelope appeared in my snail-mail box. Frankly, I thought they had forgotten about me or no longer knew where I lived. But, like the IRS, the people that run the courts in my state have a way of always finding you.
 
The last time I was called for jury duty, I was living in another county and the courthouse was within walking distance of my home. Back then, I was eager to serve. Mostly because , for at least two or three days, I would not have to go to work. It was almost as good as a mini-vacation.

 
That was not the first time I had been summoned. My services had been requested twice before and, although I was glad for the break from work, sitting in a room full of other prospective jurors waiting to be called for a “Voir Dire”[1] was not something I was looking forward to. It’s stressful and boring. Until the last time that is.


Although I tried my best to fail the jury selection process, they picked me anyway. And, since I was the first to be selected, I immediately became the jury foreperson. It was a hate crime case where the defendant was accused of 2nd degree murder in the death of a gay man. Eleven days later and a hung jury, I was released from my service as a juror with the promise that I would not be called again for another 4 years. Now, twenty-plus years later, they want me again.
 
I set the notice aside, not giving it much thought. I believed that if you were over 75, you would be excused. I was wrong. While the rules may vary in certain states, in NY, there is no upper age limit. The only way to be excused is to get a note from a doctor describing any medical conditions that would prevent me from serving. I certainly have enough of those, so I’m not worried about having

to serve. But why would they want an old codger, whose attention span is that of a gnat on a jury, anyway? I don’t care what condition someone my age is, the stress of having to sit through a trial and subsequent deliberations would take its toll, not only on my mind, but on my bladder as well. Jurisprudence and an enlarged prostate do not mix well. Monday, I’ll stop by the medical suite and have my doctor write something. If I were younger and in better health, I would have no problem spending a few days in a courthouse. It would relieve some of the boredom. And the $40 per day they pay you ain’t bad either…………………….
 
[1] Voir dire. A preliminary examination of a witness or a juror by a judge or counsel.





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Retired Seniors in U.S. Aren’t Covered
 by Biden’s Vaccine Plan

By Jonathan Levin, Josh Wingrove


President Joe Biden’s new Covid-19 plan will mandate vaccines for 100 million working Americans, but one group was conspicuously absent from this week’s announcement: senior citizens. They’re also the most likely to be hospitalized or die from the virus -- by a wide margin.


Retired seniors have been far more accepting of vaccines than their working-age counterparts. Their full vaccination rate is about 82%, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because they’re susceptible to severe illness, even relatively few unvaccinated seniors means more deaths -- and more crowded hospitals -- than would occur in a larger pool of younger adults.

About 75 million people in the U.S. are 60 and older. Recently, about four-fifths of the nation’s Covid deaths have occurred in that population.


________________________________


Senior Living Groups Praise Sweeping
New Vaccine Mandates,
 Blast Lack of Financial Relief

By Tim Regan


Senior living providers have been on the leading edge of implementing Covid-19 vaccine mandates for employees — and soon, they must be joined by every large company in the United States.


President Biden on Thursday announced plans to order companies with 100 or more employees to mandate coronavirus vaccinations for workers or test them for Covid-19 weekly.

The new emergency rule is under development at the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA will also require employers with more than 100 workers to provide paid time off for workers to get vaccinated. Businesses that ignore the new rule could face fines of as much as $14,000 per violation, a senior Biden administration official told the Washington Post.


_________________________________


Healthcare accounts not utilized by older adults
By Keith A. Reynolds


According to a news release, a poll of people age 50 to 80 found that those who do are more likely to have high incomes and education levels, and to be in good health and under the Medicare eligibility age. The poll found that out of the 29 percent of respondents who saved money for healthcare before they needed it, 19 percent used a personal bank account, only 9 percent used flexible spending accounts (FSAs), and 5 percent used health savings accounts (HSAs).


Meanwhile 40 percent of respondents say they have enough funds to pay for health costs without having to save and 27 percent reported they couldn’t afford to save for future health costs.

Having an FSA was more common among respondents aged 50 to 64, those who make more than $100,000, and those with a four-year college degree. Similar trends were seen in HSAs and other tax-advantaged options offered by employers. People who claim their health was fair or poor were less likely to have any of these accounts, according to the release.


_________________________________


Why the Cost of Long-Term Care Is
 Out of Reach for the Middle Class



More policy options may help alleviate the financial burden, though many are a long way off



The cost of aging in America, specifically for middle-income earners, has been spiraling out of control for years. But as the first boomers reach 75 this year, the financial reality of long-term care needs are moving front and center.


Seven out of 10 people will need long-term care during their lifetime — whether that's someone in the home to help with activities like bathing and dressing, a skilled nursing facility to recover after a hip replacement or assisted living or nursing home care when living at home is no longer viable, according to a recent Genworth financial survey.







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REMEMBERING, SEPTEMBER 11, 2001






Waiting For The Casualties That Never Came


There were thousands of photographs taken. Each with its own story. The people that took those photos will never forget that Tuesday morning in September 2001. And for those of us who were directly affected by the events of that day, we have our own stories and memories to tell.
 
Those at the epicenter, later known as “ground zero”, have memories of fear, terror, death and heroism. For us who were far away, like me, what we saw and remember are not the images of fire and smoke, or the screams of people and first-responders racing, not away from the towers, but to them. What we remember are the people who saw and heard what was happening just a mile and a half away and could do nothing about it. For us, it was not about survival but how we would get home, far away as possible from the nightmare we all witnessed.

Seeing one of the Towers collapse before my eyes was bad enough, almost “cartoon-like.” Walking over the Williamsburg bridge, in almost total silence, with thousands of people needing to be some place, any place else, was surreal. They are images that will forever be with me. But out of all the images, photos and videos of that day, the one that stays in my mind is one that is not reproduced over and over like the others. Mainly because the scene depicts what did not happen instead of what did.

My office was about a mile and a half from the site of the World Trade Center and directly in-line with the twin towers. Even from that distance, the towers loomed over us. They were part of the scenery we saw every day. We saw them when we walked to and from the subway or as we drove down Hudson or Greenwich Streets or when we went out for lunch. They were there. Part of the city. Part of us.
 
Shortly after, the second tower collapsed, after 10 am, we were instructed to leave our building. Our business phones would be switched over to one of our out-of-town offices. I made my way east towards the nearest subway station. Of course, the trains were not running.

 
I walked uptown from my West 10th Street office, hoping to catch a bus north to a subway that might still be in service. My walk took me past St. Vincent’s Hospital.[1] I knew they had to be very busy as they were one of the closest hospitals to ground zero. I expected to see ambulance after ambulance, sirens blaring, lights flashing and harried medical personnel rushing to get critically injured people out of the ambulances and into the ER. But what I saw was, sadly, quite different.

Instead of a scene reminiscent of an episode of Grey’s anatomy or MASH, what I observed was almost the apposite. The doctors and nurses were not rushing from patient to patient in a triage situation. Instead, they were standing there on the curb, gurneys, wheelchairs and various other medical equipment next to them with nothing to do. It had been more than an hour since the first tower collapsed, and not a single casualty had needed their services.
 
No ambulance was screeching to a halt in front of the mid-century modern building. No mangled bodies lifted on to stretchers. No IVs started or CPR performed. There was nothing but silence and, I suppose, disbelief. It took a moment for me to realize what I think the medical personnel already knew. There were no people in need of emergency help because they were beyond anything anybody standing there in the mid-morning sun could do. There were no casualties because they were all dead. Three thousand people never made it out of those buildings.

The rest of my day was spent trying to get home. With traffic at a standstill and public transportation disrupted, my only option was to walk.
 
I made my way over the Williamsburg bridge, through the streets of Brooklyn and into Queens, my home borough, where I squeezed on to a bus which took me to a subway that was still running and eventually arriving home at 3pm. I called my brother in Florida to tell him I was okay and fell asleep.
 
I don’t remember dreaming. Perhaps that’s a good thing. Years have gone by with thousands of images and miles of news footage showing the horrors of that day. But the image I remember most is the one and the one I will never forget are those people in front of that hospital waiting for the casualties that never came…….............

[1] After losing a several-year-long battle with financial hardship, St. Vincent’s closed on April 30, 2010.

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GOOD DAY



SEPTEMBER 12, 2021

A Minor Miracle.

I just wanted to say a few words concerning the incidents of COVID-19 infections among our residents and staff. THERE ARE NONE. And I consider this to be a minor miracle considering that not 100% of our residents or staff have been fully or partially vaccinated. Although the numbers are high (98% and 75% respectively) there remains the ever-present possibility of re-infection and another lockdown. In fact, any instance of COVID-19 infection among staff of residents will immediately put us back where we were 18 months ago as per DOH regulations.
 
How have we avoided another lockdown when many other facilities across the nation are reporting large numbers of re-infection? The answer is simple. The management has followed the comparatively strict protocols set by the NY State Department of Health. These include daily testing of staff and enforcing things like hand washing, mask wearing and limited contact with visitors. And, while not all residents are happy with the rules, the vast majority of us have followed them without controversy. Why? Because nobody here wants to return to a lockdown/quarantine condition. We like our freedom way too much for that………………………



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Flu season is coming fast and could be miserable
By Erika Edwards

Health officials are urging people to get their flu shots now, in an attempt to prevent further strain on hospitals already overwhelmed by Covid-19 and other viruses. The push to get flu shots as soon as possible comes as two studies warn that this flu season could be a miserable one.



"There are some factors that we cannot control as far as how bad the flu season is going to be," said Xiaoyan Song, chief infection control officer at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D.C., "but there are some that we absolutely have control over."

"Get vaccinated," she said.


______________________________________


The ‘first’ symptom of dementia may not be memory loss

Dementia is the broad term used to describe a number of different conditions that lead to progressive brain decline. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, which is generally characterised by memory loss and other cognitive abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Although there is not a cure for Alzheimer’s, spotting it early enough can slow down its progression and help you or your loved one to prolong a good quality of life.



Most people associate memory loss with Alzheimer’s but research suggests it may not be the first indicator.

This is the key finding of systematic review that investigated the existing literature.

Researchers conducted a broad sweep of the literature – spanning from from 1937 to 2016 – in a bid to document the signs and symptoms preceding the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.


___________________________________________


At the End of Life, Some Are Taking
Matters Into Their Own Hands

It's called the VSED option — the refusal to eat or drink. The goal is to hasten death and it's perfectly legal.



Some patients diagnosed with terminal illnesses or chronic progressive diseases find the prospect of a long decline, great suffering or significant deterioration to be intolerable.


For those with the desire to hasten their own death, one option is to refuse to swallow food or sip liquids. The practice, known as "voluntarily stopping eating and drinking," or VSED, typically results in death within 10 days to two weeks.


___________________________________________________________________________________

How the Pandemic Worsened
Mobility and Increased Falls

As soon as COVID-19 hit and people began to isolate; some became less physically active and others reported falling


Many people who stayed close to home during the COVID-19 pandemic last year used the opportunity to get out and walk more. But others, especially those who described themselves as isolated, became less active. Those changes in mobility may have led to an increase in the number of falls among people between the ages of 50 and 80, and what one researcher called a "bowling ball effect" due to reduced mobility and decreased physical movement.


That's according to a new survey published by the University of Michigan. The National Poll on Health Aging found that between March 2020 and January 2021, 25% of people age 50 to 80 surveyed had at least one fall during the pandemic due to a loss of balance, a slip or a trip and 70% of them hurt themselves.






Vaccine protection against hospitalization
falling slightly in older adults, CDC says

By Katie Adams
Read more  >>  https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/pharmacy/vaccine-protection-against-hospitalization-falling-slightly-in-older-adults-cdc-says.html
__________________________________________

California tops list of states offering best
long-term care services for older adults

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/california-tops-list-of-states-offering-best-long-term-care-services-for-older-adults/
_____________________________________________

Companion dogs may be a key to solving dementia
_____________________________________________

Older Adults Have Gone Digital:
Four Trends That Are Here to Stay

Read more  >> https://www.marshalltribune.com/premium/brandpoint/older-adults-have-gone-digital-four-trends-that-are-here-to-stay,22421
______________________________________________

Do some cognitive functions improve with age?
By Erika Watts
Read more  >>  https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/do-some-cognitive-functions-improve-with-age?c=1580280669625
_________________________________________________

Will Hearing Aids Ever Be Hip?
By JANE E. BRODY
__________________________________________________

Number of people with dementia
set to jump 40% to 78 million by 2030

By Stephanie Nebehay
Read more  >>  https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/number-people-with-dementia-set-jump-40-78-mln-by-2030-who-2021-09-02
_____________________________________________________

Screening for atrial fibrillation in the elderly
could help avoid stroke and death

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210830/Screening-for-atrial-fibrillation-in-the-elderly-could-help-avoid-stroke-and-death.aspx
___________________________________________

Late-summer sip:
A new world of booze-free options
By KATIE WORKMAN
Read more >>  https://apnews.com/article/lifestyle-business-399052fc6e4142c93a18d1491066ffa7?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Sep01_MorningWire&utm_term=Morning%20Wire%20Subscribers
________________________________________

After Closures For 'Unacceptable' Conditions,
New Orleans To Focus On Senior Living Centers

 By Bobbi-Jeanne Misick
Read more  >>  https://www.wwno.org/news/2021-09-06/after-closures-for-unacceptable-conditions-new-orleans-to-focus-on-senior-living-centers
_________________________________________

U.S. News launches 'Best Senior Living' program
Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/u-s-news-launches-best-senior-living-program/
____________________________________________

Medicare Dental Benefit Pushed
to 2028 Under Democrats’ Bill


_________________________________________

The US workforce has gotten
significantly older and more diverse

By Alicia Wallace
Read more  >>  https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/06/business/labor-day-american-workforce-composition/index.html
_________________________________________

Assisted, independent living move-in rates
reached record post-pandemic highs in June

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/business-daily-news/assisted-independent-living-move-in-rates-reached-record-post-pandemic-highs-in-june-nic/





A Better Place


Doesn’t all our greatest art address the subject of death—its cruelty, its inevitability? The shadow it casts on our all too brief lives? “What does it all mean?” we ask ourselves.



Allow me to tell you: death means that the dinner reservation you made for a party of seven needs to be upped to ten, then lowered to nine, and then upped again, this time to fourteen. Eighteen will ultimately show up, so you will have to sit with people you just vaguely remember at a four-top on the other side of the room, listening as the fun table, the one with your sparkling sister at it, laughs and laughs. Or perhaps you’re all together but not getting your main courses because the chef, who should be in the kitchen, cooking, is getting dressed down by your brother-in-law, who did not care for the soup. Or maybe your party has been split into six groups of three, or three groups of six. While the specifics blur together, there will remain one constant, which is you, having to hear things like “Well, I know that your father did his best.”


People love saying this when a parent dies. It’s the first thing they reach for. A man can beat his wife with car antennas, can trade his children for drugs or motorcycles, but still, when he finally, mercifully dies, his survivors will have to hear from some know-nothing at the post-funeral dinner that he did his best. This, I’m guessing, is based on the premise that we all give a hundred and ten per cent all the time, in regard to everything: our careers, our relationships, the attention we pay to our appearance, etc.








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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, September 9, 2021





SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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After Closures For 'Unacceptable' Conditions,
New Orleans To Focus On Senior Living Centers

By Bobbi-Jeanne Misick


After New Orleans officials shut down several senior apartment complexes over the weekend, Mayor LaToya Cantrell said her administration is focused on ensuring that residents who were moved from those assisted living facilities in the city after Hurricane Ida are returned to facilities that are in better conditions.


“What we found was unacceptable and accountability will be across the board,” Cantrell said at a press conference on Monday. “But right now we will remain focused on improving the conditions in the facilities that we closed. We will not see this happen again.”

After the storm, the New Orleans Health Department conducted wellness checks at several senior apartment complexes and found eight facilities to be unfit for ongoing occupancy. Strike teams found five people dead in some of those homes, a statement from the city said.


_________________________________________


U.S. News launches 'Best Senior Living' program

U.S. News & World Report has launched a “Best Senior Living” initiative with the goal of releasing inaugural listings for consumers in the first quarter of 2022.


The program will cover individual independent living, assisted living, memory care and continuing care retirement/life plan communities.

Chad Smolinski, chief product officer for U.S. News, told McKnight’s Senior Living that the initiative is a logical step for a company that over the decades has shifted from a news and information publisher to a one with a mission to “help consumers make better decisions.” Today, the brand is known for its lists of hospitals and colleges, among other topics.


_____________________________________


Medicare Dental Benefit Pushed
 to 2028 Under Democrats’ Bill


Seniors on Medicare would get vision and hearing benefits over the next two years but would wait until 2028 for dental coverage under legislation a key House panel announced Tuesday.



The measure, set to be a central part of Democrats’ $3.5 trillion domestic policy package, would be one of the largest expansions of Medicare benefits since its prescription drug program was created almost 20 years ago.


“This is our historic opportunity to support working families and ensure our economy is stronger, more inclusive, and more resilient for generations to come,” Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.), chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, said in a statement.


________________________________________


The US workforce has gotten
significantly older and more diverse

By Alicia Wallace


America's workforce is considerably older and more diverse than it was 40-some years ago.



Federal labor economists recently analyzed federal labor data to see just how much the nation's labor force has changed in recent decades, according to a Sept. 1 blog post on the US Bureau of Labor Statistics site.
In examining the Consumer Population Survey data, the economists looked "peak to peak," zeroing in on 1979 and 2019 — two high points of employment and economic activity.

Here's a quick look at how the American labor force has changed and some of the reasons behind the biggest shifts in its composition.


_______________________________________


Assisted, independent living move-in rates
 reached record post-pandemic highs in June


Move-ins outpaced move-outs in all three senior living segments — independent living, assisted living, and memory care — for four consecutive months from March through June of this year, showing continued improvement. That’s according to the latest monthly data from National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care’s NIC MAP Data Service, powered by NIC MAP Vision.


Further, June move-ins for the independent living and assisted living care segments reached their respective recorded highs since the start of the pandemic. Independent living reached 2.8% of inventory and assisted living reached 3.8% of inventory. Move-ins for the memory care segments also were high in the second quarter of the year, at 4.4% of inventory in June, down from the recorded high of 4.7% of inventory in March of this year.

NIC also released its latest monthly data Thursday on occupancy within the skilled nursing sector. The upward trend in skilled nursing occupancy continued in June. Occupancy increased for the fifth consecutive month, rising 86 basis points from May to end of June at 74.2%. Occupancy is now up 297 basis points from the 71.2% low point reached in January of this year.


_______________________________________




7 massive holes in social care reform
 as thousands will have to sell their home

By Dan Bloom


Boris Johnson stood up in No10 today and announced something that - in his words - “should have been done a long time ago”.


The Prime Minister finally unveiled his plan to fix social care in England, two years after he claimed was “clear and prepared”.


But he broke a manifesto pledge to pay for it - hiking National Insurance UK-wide by 1.25% from April, in a move that will cost £30k earners £255 a year.







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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, September 8, 2021







SEPTEMBER 8, 2021


My Season Of Discontent


The weather here has been gorgeous. The big storm we had last week brought about nothing but bright sun and clear blue skies. And, although it’s been warm, there is very little humidity. The cool breeze that wafts across our sun-drenched patio has changed the mood of many of our residents who were locked in their rooms for the last 16 months. There’s nothing like nice weather to ease painful, arthritic joints and congested lungs. And normally, if this were any other time of year, I too would enjoy all that nature offers. But the days between Labor Day to after the Jewish holidays traditionally, for me, have harbored nothing but bad memories.


Most likely, my disdain for this time of year began early in my life. Kids in New York City return to school shortly after Labor Day. The joyful, carefree days of summer were over and it was back to rising early, trekking to school, putting up with the nasty kids, the boring classes and homework. That’s a lot to be sad about, especially when you consider the weather still looks and feels like summer. But that’s kid stuff. So why do I dislike these days now that I’m an adult? Because two life-changing incidents happened to me in early September.

The first happened in 1984 when, on a bright sunny Saturday afternoon, my wife stopped me at the entrance to our living room and, with tears in her eyes and purpose in her voice, announce, “I want a divorce.” A stiletto to the heart could not have been more painful or more final. I knew our marriage was in trouble, but I never thought it to be irretrievable. She thought differently. A so, our 8 year adventure together ended. I moved out of our house a few days later.

The second bad memory occurred  17 years later on an equally clear, mild September morn. It was the 11th day of September 2001 and for me ,and the world, nothing would ever be the same. Although I was not at ground zero, I was close enough to watch the towers come down. Towers, that only a few hours earlier, I observed from the window of my car as I drove over the Williamsburg bridge on my way to work in Greenwich Village. Little did I know I would be on that same bridge, on foot, desperately trying to get home to the relative safety of my apartment in Queens. I spent the rest of that day in front of the TV watching, with disbelief, the horror I had seen with my own eyes unfold.


 No, this time of year is not a happy time for me. And the prospect of going through another Winter under the constant threat of another COVID-related lockdown does nothing to lessen the feeling. The weatherman is looking for rain, perhaps later today or tomorrow. Somehow I don’t think that will make me feel any better…
 



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Steven Petrow's Advice On Stupid Things
Not to Do When You Get Old


The author’s new book gives ideas on how to age better than the generations before us



When author Steven Petrow was in his 50s and his parents were in their 70s, he began to see them making quite a number of decisions that he thought weren't in their best interests. He started to make notes, which led first to a New York Times column (more on that later) and now a book: "Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old: A Highly Judgmental, Unapologetically Honest Accounting of All the Things Our Elders Are Doing Wrong."


Petrow, now 64, took time to talk with us about his book and what he's learned from writing it. What follows is our interview, edited for length and clarity.



____________________________________


Dementia: How often do you dream?
Your dreaming habits could determine your risk

By Solen Le Net

Despite predictions that dementia cases will triple by the mid-century, progress in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases remains slow. However, it is clear that lifestyle is key to improving conditions for at-risk populations. New research has found that brain activity during sleep could be key to warding off mental decline.



Dementia, which is typically caused by Alzheimer's disease, affects an estimated 850,000 people in the UK alone. There is mounting evidence that the disorder is caused by decreased cerebral blood flow, which damages and eventually kills brain cells. A new study conducted on mice, has shed new light on brain activity, notably blood flow, during the REM stage of sleep. Study authors believe the findings could pave the way for the development of new therapies.

In both mice and humans, REM sleep is characterised by rapid eye movements and vivid dreams.


_________________________________________


10 Choices That Can Help You Live Longer


If you are under 60 and in reasonably good health, I believe you will witness some groundbreaking health care advances within your lifetime. And, I believe, you will be able to grow young with the aid of these astonishing new technologies.


Quit your bad habits. I'm talking about cigarettes, alcohol and sugar.

Living to at least 100 is within reach for most people on the planet today. In the United States, 50% currently make it past 83 and 25% past 90. Going forward, these numbers will only improve for anyone who follows what I call a longevity-optimized lifestyle.


___________________________________


Study explores factors that drive older adults
to start or sustain physical activity

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

The importance of physical activity is well recognized by both science and the public. Yet, more than 80 percent of adults in the United States fail to meet the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans," which recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week. Moreover, 40 percent of Americans over the age of 75 are entirely inactive.



Little is known about factors that are associated with increasing, sustaining, or declining physical activity levels over time, which is necessary to achieve and maintain the long-term benefits of being physically active. In older adults especially, these trends are poorly understood.


A study by Florida Atlantic University's Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing and collaborators explored what drives older adults from diverse backgrounds to start or sustain physical activity and what prevents them from doing so. The bottom line: knowledge and old clichés alone aren't enough.





Australian state leader plans ‘vaccinated economy’
 that will ‘lock out’ those who refuse COVID jabs



MELBOURNE, Victoria, Australia (LifeSiteNews) – The leader of the southeastern state of Victoria in Australia warned unvaccinated people that they will be locked out of society under his plans for eventually reopening the economy.


In common with political leaders around the world, Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews insists that receiving one of the experimental jabs is essential for “safety,” ignoring the fact that thousands of people worldwide have died or suffered other serious side effects after receiving one of the shots.



Andrews told a press conference last week that Victoria, with Melbourne as its capital, will move from a state of lockdown to “lockouts” for those who refuse to get jabbed.  









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NEXT NEW BLOG THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, September 7, 2021






SEPTEMBER 7, 2021



Labor Day has come and gone and I hope yours was joyful and, most important, safe. For many Americans, Labor Day is being spent in a hospital bed fighting for their lives. Not a pleasant thought, I know. But it’s the reality of the times we live in. How did we become so distrustful of our fellow citizens? Why can’t some see what is right in front of their noses? The truth is, we may never be rid of this virus and its variants until we all work together to stop it. And that means getting vaccinated or, at the very least, following basic anti-infection protocols. We here at the A.L.F. had to forego our yearly BBQ again. The threat of a re-occurrence of the virus and subsequent lockdown remains a threat. Instead, we had just a little taste of what we might have had if there was a BBQ. Sadly, it ain’t much……...........









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Will Hearing Aids Ever Be Hip?
By JANE E. BRODY


You may be tired of reading columns about the dismally poor use of hearing aids by Americans. And, to be honest, I’d rather not have to write one every year or two. However, most people who could significantly benefit from these miracles of miniaturization still do not use them. But help is on the horizon.


Two-thirds of Americans aged 70 and older “have clinically relevant hearing loss,” according to the Johns Hopkins Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health. Unaddressed hearing loss can increase the risk of cognitive decline, dementia, falls, cardiovascular disease, social isolation, depression and anxiety, but less than 20 percent of the adults who could benefit from a hearing aid currently wear one.

Although the need is generally greatest for those 65 and older, the Medicare legislation of 1965 excluded the coverage for hearing aids (as well as for vision aids and dental care) and never updated it. Medicare does cover the cost of a hearing exam performed by an audiologist, who can diagnose and prescribe treatment for hearing loss. But if the result is a prescription for hearing aids, which can range in cost from about $2,000 to $12,000 a pair, they will not be covered by Medicare and only rarely by private insurance.


_______________________________________


Number of people with dementia
set to jump 40% to 78 million by 2030

By Stephanie Nebehay


More than 55 million people worldwide are living with dementia, a neurological disorder that robs them of their memory and costs the world $1.3 trillion a year, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday.


The progressive condition can be caused by stroke, brain injury or Alzheimer's disease. With populations ageing, the number of sufferers is projected to rise to 78 million by 2030 and 139 million by 2050, the WHO said in a report.



Only one in four countries has a national policy in place to support dementia patients and their families, it said, urging governments to step up to the public health challenge.


__________________________________________


Screening for atrial fibrillation in the elderly
 could help avoid stroke and death

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Screening for atrial fibrillation in 75- and 76-year-olds could reduce the risk of stroke, severe bleeding and death, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published in the journal The Lancet.



Atrial fibrillation, a form of arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat, is associated with a five-fold increased risk of stroke. The symptoms are often deleterious since large blood clots can form in the heart, break free and risk clogging large vessels in the brain and cause stroke. Anticoagulant therapy reduces the risk of stroke. Still, countries do not screen the general population for atrial fibrillation, but rather treat those patients who are discovered during routine care.


"There has never really been a study that examines if it would be beneficial to screen for atrial fibrillation, which is why we wanted to investigate it."


_____________________________________


Late-summer sip:
A new world of booze-free options
By KATIE WORKMAN


Looking to kick back and enjoy the late days of summer with something non-alcoholic? There’s been a real transformation going on in the world of non-alcoholic beverages.



Craftspeople, mixologists and scientists have moved well beyond sweet “fake wines” and watery no-alcohol beers. There’s now a bountiful selection of zero-proof drinks that don’t feel like a substitution for something, but rather like a stand-alone genre of sophisticated drink choices.

Interest in a sober lifestyle has been growing for years, leading to the rise of mocktails and alcohol-free bars. The pandemic led even more people to question boozy drinking habits as they found themselves at home much of the time, feeling anxious, perhaps, or trying not to put on weight.










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NEXT NEW BLOG WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, September 6, 2021










SEPTEMBER 6, 2021




5 minutes


I had my first physical therapy session last Thursday. As I sat, waiting for my therapist to finish with another patient, the memory of my first introduction to PT over 9-years-ago flashed before me. And that memory was not a nice one. It was bad, not because the therapy did not work, but because of the pain, frustration and depression I experienced. But this time it’s not the same. I’m here, not because I need to be here to save my life, but because I want to be here to improve it. That’s a big difference.

 
My last therapy began in 2010 and lasted (on and off) for two years and at three different rehab units. My goal was simple. Get out of the f***ing wheelchair that had become my nemesis and my shame. I say “shame” because I was almost completely helpless. Unable to lift myself in or out of that contraption. Back then, the process was slow and deliberate. I had to learn to walk again. Finally, after many months and countless numbers of therapists, I graduated from the “chair” to a walker and then to a Rollator just a week before I arrived here at the ALF. And now, I was back. Not to learn to walk, but to walk better, longer and steadier. I knew what lay ahead of me would not be easy. But this time I knew there would (or should)be results.


The session began with some balance tests. I stood, without my cane to support me, my feet heal to toe while the therapist tried to push me over. She told me to resist as best I could. To my surprise, I could maintain my balance. This was a baseline, a place to begin. On to the parallel bars. I remembered these well. It’s the first thing they allow you to do once you have mastered standing on your own. But unlike before, I had no trouble walking from one end to the other and back. And, even when she told me to walk heel to toe forwards and backwards, I could do it with little difficulty. A few more “exercises” on the bars and I was ready for the big test. The one I was most apprehensive about. The treadmill.


I had never used a treadmill. It’s not a device one should try without supervision. It could be downright dangerous.

 
The therapist asked how long do I think I could walk without stopping. I told her, “I didn’t know, but probably not for over three minutes. I stepped gingerly onto the device, clung on to the handlebars and waited for her to turn it on.

 
“We’ll start off at the lowest speed. One mile per hour and see how long you can maintain that pace. Silently, the ground beneath my feet moved. There was nothing for me to do but move with it. It was a creepy feeling. One rarely walks on a surface that’s constantly in motion. It was very much like those people movers they have at some airports. However, I quickly became used to it and had only minor difficulty keeping up. My biggest problem was keeping myself upright and standing erect. After what seemed like an hour, but in actuality, only 3 minutes, I became winded. I asked her to stop the treadmill. She said it was not bad for the first time, but I was sorry I could not have lasted longer. “We’ll try for four or five minutes next time. Okay?” I was quick to agree. All I wanted to do was rest. You never know how out-of-shape you are until you’ve been on a treadmill. Unlike a walk in the park, it’s merciless and impersonal. But truthfully, I can’t wait to try it again.



Because of Rosh Hashanah, there will be no session on Tuesday. But this coming Thursday I’ll be back at it. My goal will be 4 minutes (maybe 5). I’ll let you know if I make it..................


*   *   *


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Vaccine protection against hospitalization
falling slightly in older adults, CDC says

By Katie Adams


COVID-19 vaccines' efficacy in preventing hospitalization decreases over time among people ages 75 and older, but it was still above 80 percent at the end of July, according to data presented Aug. 30 to the CDC's independent panel of vaccine experts.



Protection levels stayed higher among adults under age 75. Sara Oliver, MD, a member of the CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service, said COVID-19 vaccines' efficacy in preventing hospitalization among adults ages 18-49 remains at 94 percent or higher.


The data, which suggests COVID-19 vaccines' efficacy may be beginning to wane among vulnerable populations who were vaccinated earliest, was presented to the panel during a meeting discussing the U.S. booster plan, according to CBS News.


______________________________________________________


California tops list of states offering best
long-term care services for older adults



A comparison of cost, access and quality has launched California to the top of MedicareGuide’s list of top states for long-term care.


The Sunshine State topped the best lists for assisted living costs per month, adult day services total licensed capacity, homemaker services per month, and home health aide costs per month.


States rounding out the top five for long-term care are Minnesota, Washington, Texas and New York. Bottom-ranking states for older adults needing long-term care services are Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nevada and Mississippi.


_______________________________________________________


Companion dogs may be a key to solving dementia


New research measured an Alzheimer's disease-associated peptide (Aβ42) in companion dog brains and found that higher abundance is associated with increased cognitive decline. The data support that cognitive dysfunction in dogs models several key aspects of human dementia, underscoring the suitability and usefulness of companion dogs as an animal model for aging studies.


Dementia is an umbrella term for loss of memory and ability to learn, deterioration in thinking, behavior, and the ability to carry out daily tasks. The chance of getting dementia rises as one gets older: In general, 5-8% of people over 60 are thought to have some degree of dementia. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer's Disease, for which unfortunately no cure exists yet. One main limitation in Alzheimer's research is the lack of useful animal models that develop dementia spontaneously, without genetic engineering, and also adequately reflect the genetic and environmental complexity of humans.


_________________________________________________


Older Adults Have Gone Digital:
Four Trends That Are Here to Stay



During the pandemic, many older adults went digital, adopting technology to manage daily tasks and stay connected to family and friends. As we emerge from COVID-19, here’s what we see ahead for older adults with respect to their use of technology.



Post-pandemic, older adults will continue to acquire and use tech


It’s probably no surprise that during the pandemic, older adults’ usage and acquisition of tech increased, according to AARP’s annual tech survey and we predict these trends will continue once the pandemic ends.


______________________________________


Do some cognitive functions improve with age?
By Erika Watts

   
For years, most research indicated that older adults experience a decline in brain functioning across the board. However, a new observational study, which appears in Nature Human Behaviour Trusted Source, suggests that may not be true.



The study’s authors found that rather than seeing a decline in all cognitive functions, older adults instead demonstrated improvements in some domains.


According to the American Psychological Association, cognitive functioning refers to “performance of the mental processes of perception, learning, memory, understanding, awareness, reasoning, judgment, intuition, and language.”


___________





Daughter on Universal Credit fears for dad often
left with 37p after paying bills


On a sunny day last week in the seaside resort of Bridlington, ­dozens of families gathered on the sand. For many of the children, whose families rely on Universal Credit, it was their first ever view of the sea.



They were using their buckets and spades not to build sandcastles but to create a giant sand sculpture, with the words “Cancel The Cut”.


Katy Howard, 30, was with daughter Casi-Rose, eight, and other members of Unite Community to protest the £20 cut to Universal Credit that is about to plunge millions into poverty.










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NEXT NEW BLOG TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH 2021





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GOOD DAY
It’s Sunday, September 5, 2021







SEPTEMBER 5, 2021


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Annuities make it easier for retirees to spend
By Kate Dore


With fewer employer pensions these days, some retirees are hesitant to draw down their nest eggs. However, older Americans may spend more freely with a guaranteed source of income, such as Social Security or a private annuity.


That’s according to a research paper that examines spending in retirement. The report compared retirees with a life-long income stream to those living off an investment portfolio.




The findings suggest retirees with guaranteed income may spend twice as much as those tapping wealth from their retirement savings.


_______________________________________

Eating walnuts every day could
 lower bad cholesterol in older adults


Adding a fistful of walnuts to your daily diet – no matter what else you eat – could lower bad cholesterol levels and reduce heart risks in otherwise healthy older adults, a new study suggests.



The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, found people who ate about half a cup of walnuts every day for two years modestly lowered their LDL, or "bad," cholesterol levels as well as the number of LDL particles associated with cardiovascular disease risk.


Previous studies show walnuts, which are high in omega-3 fatty acids, are associated with lower rates of heart disease and stroke, as are nuts in general.


___________________________________________


Aging Care Leaders: Congress Must Pass "Gamechanger" Bill


Congress must pass a massive social programs bill that includes billions in funding for seniors and those with disabilities, leaders in home health and senior services said Tuesday.


“Homecare providers are too short-staffed to send help, adult daycare services too few and far between, and there are waitlists for affordable housing … so millions of families have been trying to fill this gap by stepping in as caregivers,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of Leading Age. “This is the most important moment in decades for older Americans and their families.”


She said that if Congress doesn’t act now to pass the $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill, the nonprofits and other groups providing senior care will be overwhelmed. The bill sets up a framework for construction of legislation to expand social programs—including around $400 billion worth that will go toward senior care, home- and community- based services, and pay raises for caregivers, among other items.


_________________________________


Comparing seniors who relocate long-distance
 shows where you live affects your longevity

By Peter Dizikes

Would you like to live longer? It turns out that where you live, not just how you live, can make a big difference.


That’s the finding of an innovative study co-authored by an MIT economist, which examines senior citizens across the U.S. and concludes that some locations enhance longevity more than others, potentially for multiple reasons.


The results show that when a 65-year-old moves from a metro area in the 10th percentile, in terms of how much those areas enhance longevity, to a metro area the 90th percentile, it increases that person’s life expectancy by 1.1 years. That is a notable boost, given that mean life expectancy for 65-year-olds in the U.S. is 83.3 years.


___________________________________________


More Than 80 Percent of Seniors Are Vaccinated.
 That’s ‘Not Safe Enough.’

By Paula Span


Dr. Won Lee began her initial visit to a new homebound patient, Almeta Trotter, last month by asking about her life, her health and how she was managing in her apartment in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston she shares with her longtime partner and a parakeet.


Eventually Dr. Lee, the medical director of the Geriatrics Home Care Program at Boston Medical Center, raised a key question. “I said, ‘What are your feelings about vaccination against Covid?’”



“I heard that I shouldn’t get it because I take blood thinners” for a heart problem, replied Ms. Trotter, 77.



*   *   *


Commentary: Old people ads
William Carter • Columnist



Apparently, according to all of the commercials out there these days targeting only old people, no matter what they’re advertising, I’m supposed to be practicing Tai Chi in a park somewhere with a bunch of other old people, or tottering into the kitchen to interrupt my wife as she’s making soup for lunch, sweep her into my arms and slow dance with her, cheek to cheek, for no other reason than, I guess, to indicate how happy we are to be retired and having soup for lunch. 


Old people also play a lot of cards in these commercials, discuss disposable catheters with each other or admire the free, plastic water bottles we received for renewing our yearly memberships to AARP.  

Old people seem to like to admit, too, how terrified we all are of climbing ladders to clean out our gutters, which, if the ominous, underlying message of one particular, clog-free gutter ad is to be believed, is the second leading cause of death of the elderly, topped only by stress-related heart attacks from screaming at squirrels that are invading our bird feeders. 







Home Is Where the Health Care Is: New Study Shows Increase
in Number of Homebound Older Adults
While CMS Expands Home Health Reimbursement Model

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/home-is-where-the-health-care-is-new-3675826/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link_______________________________

Don't Have Much of a 401k or IRA?
How Senior Citizens Build
A Retirement Fund On A Fixed Income

By Georgina Tzanetos
Read more  >>  https://www.gobankingrates.com/retirement/planning/senior-citizens-build-retirement-fund-on-fixed-income/
_______________________________________

3 Conversations Solo Agers Should Have
to Pre-Plan Their Funerals

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/funerals-aging-alone/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=fb688f2c3e-Tuesday_Newsletter_08_24_21__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-fb688f2c3e-165407981&mc_cid=fb688f2c3e&mc_eid=94767a79b9
___________________________________

What to Do When You Feel Like
 You Can't Do Anything

Read more>>  https://www.nextavenue.org/surgery-what-to-do/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=fb688f2c3e-Tuesday_Newsletter_08_24_21__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-fb688f2c3e-165407981&mc_cid=fb688f2c3e&mc_eid=94767a79b9
____________________________________________________

Reliving high times?
Marijuana use on the rise in older men

By Linda Carroll

Read more  >>  https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/marijuana-use-rise-older-adults-n1238914
_________________________________________________________

Most retirees will need long-term care.
These are the best ways to pay for it

By Kate Dore
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/26/most-retirees-will-need-long-term-care-these-are-ways-to-pay-for-it-.html
______________________________________________________

Motor control in older adults may be exacerbated
by age-related executive functioning decline

Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210826/Motor-control-in-older-adults-may-be-exacerbated-by-age-related-executive-functioning-decline.aspx
____________________________________________________

The Top 10 Reasons Americans Do Not Retire
By Marilyn Lewis
Read more  >>  https://www.moneytalksnews.com/slideshows/the-top-reasons-americans-do-not-retire/________________________________________________________

Choose Home Care Act Presents Senior Living Opportunities,
Draws Skilled Nursing Backlash

By Chuck Sudo
Read more  >>  https://seniorhousingnews.com/2021/08/29/choose-home-care-act-presents-senior-living-opportunities-draws-skilled-nursing-backlash/
______________________________________

Aging in Place Is Gaining Popularity Among Retirees.
Here's How to Prep Your Home.

By Debbie Carlson
Read more  >>  https://www.barrons.com/articles/aging-in-place-retirees-prep-your-home-51630076579?tesla=y
___________________________________

Gray Divorce’ Is on the Rise:
How to Strengthen Your Relationship at Any Age

By Becky Upham
Read more  >> https://www.everydayhealth.com/emotional-health/why-more-couples-are-divorcing-at-older-ages-than-before-and-what-you-can-do-to-avoid-it/
_______________________________________

Can virtual reality help seniors?
Study hopes to find out

By TERRY SPENCER
Read more >>  https://apnews.com/article/seniors-business-technology-health-education-007b522597b60b45fd9f3b2c4e0b5e87
_____________________________________________

Mentally stimulating jobs linked to
lower risk of dementia in old age

Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-08-mentally-jobs-linked-dementia-age.html
_________________________________________________________

Age Can Impair a Man's Odds for Fatherhood
By Cara Murez
Read more  >>  https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-08-23/age-can-impair-a-mans-odds-for-fatherhood-study
___________________________________________________________

Study focuses on understanding how muscle fatigue
and changes in gait affect older adults
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210825/Study-focuses-on-understanding-how-muscle-fatigue-and-changes-in-gait-affect-older-adults.aspx
___________________________________________________________

Study shows that rewarded life experiences
are replayed and consolidated during sleep

By Ingrid Fadelli
________________________________________________________

Social Security, on surprisingly solid ground
By Eric Kingson, Nancy Altman
Read more  >>  https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-social-security-on-surprisingly-solid-ground-20210831-lflrsgmu6zgvlhwkoognh63tki-story.html
______________________________________________

Social Security Costs Expected to Exceed Total Income in 2021
as Covid-19 Takes Financial Toll

By Kate Davidson
Read more  >>  https://www.wsj.com/articles/social-security-costs-expected-to-exceed-total-income-in-2021-as-covid-19-takes-financial-toll-11630436193
______________________________________________________
How Long Can the IRS Levy
on Social Security Benefits?

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/how-long-can-the-irs-levy-on-social-6605536/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
__________________________________________________

43 friends in the Senate
Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/editors-columns/43-friends-in-the-senate/________________________________________________

The Surprising Exercise You Stop Doing After 60
By John Anderer
Read more  >>  https://www.eatthis.com/the-surprising-exercise-you-stop-doing-after-60-say-experts/





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GOOD DAY
It’s Thursday, September 2, 2021







SEPTEMBER 2, 2021


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Social Security, on surprisingly solid ground
By Eric Kingson, Nancy Altman

The just-released 2021 Social Security Trustees Report shows that, even in the midst of a deadly, worldwide pandemic, Social Security has met and continues to meet all its obligations to the American people, just as it has done for more than 80 years. It has done so in times of war, economic collapse, and a once-in-a-century health-care crisis.



According to the 2021 report, Social Security currently costs around 5% of gross domestic product. At the end of the 21st century, that rises by only about one percentage point to 6% of GDP. Nearly all other industrial capitalist nations, right now, today, devote a larger percentage of GDP — with Germany, France and Portugal spending about 11% — to fund their retirement, survivors and disability systems. At a time when the age 65-and-over population is continuing to grow numerically and as a percent of the United States — from 54 million in 2019 (16.5% of the United States population) to an estimated 81 million in 2040 (22%) and 94 million in 2060 (23%) — that small increase in GDP is more than justified.


The report shows that Social Security’s earned benefits can be paid in full until 2034. Even if Congress does absolutely nothing during the next 75 years, the program would be able to pay around 78 cents of every benefit dollar earned by the American people.


________________________________________________

Social Security Costs Expected to Exceed Total Income in 2021
 as Covid-19 Takes Financial Toll

By Kate Davidson

WASHINGTON—The severe economic downturn caused by the Covid-19 pandemic last year weighed on the financial health of Social Security, but not nearly as much as many forecasters originally feared, according to new projections of the program’s finances.



Trustees for the Social Security trust fund in an annual report released Tuesday said the program is expected to pay benefits that exceed its income in 2021, the same as it anticipated last year at the outset of the pandemic.
While the pandemic had a significant impact on the program, the trustees said, they expect Social Security’s reserves to be depleted by 2034, only one year sooner than they estimated in their April 2020 report. Once the reserves are exhausted, benefits would be reduced automatically unless Congress steps in to shore up the program, which lawmakers have done previously.


How Long Can the IRS Levy
 on Social Security Benefits?


To levy on Social Security benefits, the IRS generally issues Form 668-W to the Social Security Administration (“SSA”).[i]  After receipt of the Form 668-W, Notice of Levy on Wages, Salary, and Other Income, SSA will withhold future amounts of payments due to the Social Security beneficiary and remit the same to the IRS for payment on outstanding tax liabilities. Often, the question I receive from clients subject to Social Security levies is how long will the levy continue?  This Insight tackles that interesting question.



After a tax assessment has been made, the IRS generally waits for the taxpayer to make full payment of the assessment or offer payment arrangements (e.g., an installment agreement or an offer in compromise).  But, if the taxpayer fails to do either, the IRS will begin issuing notices to the taxpayer to demand full payment.  Taxpayers who ignore these notices generally do so at their own peril.


Indeed, if a taxpayer fails to make full payment of an assessed tax, the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) specifically authorizes the IRS to collect payment through other means, including administrative levies.  Administrative levies are unique to the IRS.  Generally, creditors other than the IRS must obtain a court order to make a levy against a third party.  This is not so for the IRS, which simply has to serve an administrative levy notice.  See Barnard v. Pavlish, 187 F.3d 625 (3d Cir. 1999).


43 friends in the Senate

The drumbeat continues for more funding to help senior living and care providers simply survive in the wake of all of the pandemic-related expenses they have incurred. Or simply the release of funding that already has been promised.



You’ve seen the numbers. In a National Center for Assisted Living survey of 122 assisted living communities that we reported on in June, 49% of respondents said they are operating at a loss, and the same percentage said they have made cuts this year due to increased expenses and lost revenue due to COVID-19.


All of the major associations representing senior living operators have been making noise, alone and together, to try to get Provider Relief Fund monies — or, at a minimum, more information about those funds — released. In one example, the American Health Care Association / NCAL, the American Seniors Housing Association, Argentum and LeadingAge sent a letter to the administration earlier this month asking for the immediate allocation of remaining PRF dollars to senior living communities and nursing homes.

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/editors-columns/43-friends-in-the-senate/

____________________________________________________


The Surprising Exercise
You Stop Doing After 60

By John Anderer

There are plenty of reasons to keep moving well beyond your 60th birthday. Regular exercise in old age helps preserve cognition, improve balance, and prevent bone loss—just to name a few perks. In fact, a recent study even reports that when we exercise, a specific hormone is released by the muscles into the bloodstream. From there, the hormone makes its way to the brain where it helps "supercharge" neurons, providing a serious brain boost. Researchers say one day the hormone may be developed as a form of Alzheimer's treatment.



With all of those benefits in mind, many older adults are inclined to hit the ground running with new and intense exercise routines and ideas. While intense workouts seven days a week are an admirable fitness idea in theory, it's also just as important for exercisers over 60 to work around their personal bodily limitations. For instance, the Mayo Clinic advises that older adults living with conditions including heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, or high blood pressure consult with their physician before starting a new workout regimen.


Besides speaking with a doctor, the exercises older adults choose to engage in should be carefully chosen as well. According to Leann Poston M.D., M.B.A., M.Ed., of Invigor Medical, seniors should prioritize exercises that strengthen bone density, improve balance, and add muscle mass. Moreover, it's super important to start slow. If an older individual is new to weightlifting they should "start with light weights or even soup cans and increase the weight as able," she explains.






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GOOD DAY
It’s Wednesday, September 1, 2021






“They know what the Destroyer learned a long time ago
—lying in bed doesn’t rehabilitate anyone.”
                                                                            ― Adele Levine



SEPTEMBER 1, 2021


Email- theseniorlog@protonmail.com



Mentally stimulating jobs linked to
 lower risk of dementia in old age



People with mentally stimulating jobs have a lower risk of dementia in old age than those with non-stimulating jobs, finds a study published by The BMJ today.


One possible explanation is that mental stimulation is linked to lower levels of certain proteins that may prevent brain cells forming new connections (processes called axonogenesis and synaptogenesis).

Cognitive stimulation is assumed to prevent or postpone the onset of dementia. But trial results have varied and most recent long term studies have suggested that leisure time cognitive activity does not reduce risk of dementia.


_______________________________________


Age Can Impair a Man's Odds for Fatherhood
By Cara Murez

It's no surprise to hear that women's fertility wanes as their biological clock ticks away.

But do men have a biological clock, too?


New research shows it's not exactly the same, but their likelihood of fathering a child does appear to decline, even with assisted reproductive technology, once they're past age 50.


Research completed among potential fathers both above and under age 50 in the United Kingdom found that even with in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the chance of achieving a live birth significantly declined once a man was over 50. However, that paternal age did not independently affect risk of miscarriage after assisted reproductive technology.


_______________________________________


Study focuses on understanding how muscle fatigue
 and changes in gait affect older adults



Older adults on a walk or hike, or just going about their daily routines, seem to experience greater fatigue than their younger counterparts. Such fatigue may ultimately affect their ability to participate in activities that are meaningful to them and help keep them healthy.


A University of Massachusetts Amherst team of scientists in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences is focused on understanding how muscle fatigue and changes in gait affect the ability of people in their 70s and 80s to remain active.


With a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute on Aging, biomechanical engineer Katherine Boyer will lead the study, which has started to recruit participants in Western Massachusetts.


____________________________________________


Study shows that rewarded life experiences
 are replayed and consolidated during sleep

By Ingrid Fadelli

Past neuroscience studies have consistently showed that sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation. For instance, some neuroimaging research showed that the brain regions that are activated while humans are encoding waking experiences can later be reactivated during sleep, particularly during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep.


Interestingly, the same brain regions are also associated with increased local slow-wave activity (SWA). Interestingly, the activation of these brain regions and SWA are known to be associated with two mechanisms related to memory optimization, namely neural replay and synaptic homeostasis. These mechanisms are typically associated with improvements in behavior over time.


Researchers at University of Geneva in Switzerland have recently carried out a study aimed at investigating the ways in which the brain selects memories that will be reprocessed during sleep. Their findings, presented in a paper published in Nature Communications, suggest that the brain tends to prioritize the consolidation of memories or life experiences with high motivational relevance, namely those associated with rewards.






It was time for me to face reality. The over 16 months of isolation had taken its toll on my mobility.
 
BC (Before Covid) I had little problem walking around the perimeter of our 14 acre facility. Today, I barely could walk around our 15 car parking lot without feeling soreness in my legs, hips and knees (plus a good deal of gasping for air). I needed help. Fortunately, it was not far away. And the timing could not have been better.
 
Among the many “amenities” here at the A.L.F. is having several healthcare professionals on sight. Among those (and separate from the facilities staff) is a group of men and women who operate a physical therapy unit in our main building. The staff are all trained and dedicated PT’s who have helped many of our residents get and maintain their mobility and other motor functions. And, once a year, we residents are offered an evaluation of our physical condition. My time came yesterday.

After lunch, I made my way down to our lower-level where our physical therapy unit is located. I had been there two or three times in the past inquiring about using some of the equipment in my spare time. But this was the first time I was there as a potential patient.
 
I was met by a young lady dressed in dark blue scrubs. After the introductory formalities, we got down to business. Questions about my current condition were followed by listing what I hoped to accomplish.

I explained my desire to at least return to my pre-covid state and possibly even improving it. She listened intently and told me that was not out of the realm of possibility. We then began the “physical” part of the evaluation. Some of which I had been through before.
 
Before coming here to the facility, I had been a patient in a nursing home/therapy situation struggling to regain the mobility I lost after months of hospitalization. My goal then was just to lift myself out of a wheelchair and walk with the aid of a walker. It took 21/2 years to get that done. It was painful and, at times, discouraging. But I did it. That was ten years ago. Now, I was older and fatter.

The evaluation began with testing the strength of my legs. She pushed down on my ankles while I did my best to resist. It seems my legs were fairly strong. I knew that. The problem was mostly with my stamina and balance. I should not get as tired as fast as I do for the short distances I walk. Of course, there was a test for that which included, of all things, walking a certain distance in six minutes and, thereafter, testing my pulse and oxygen levels. I did not do as well as I had done with the strength test. My O2 dropped dramatically. And I could feel pain in my legs and hips. We both agreed I needed to do some work.
 
Therapy is not new to me. And brings back bad memories. But I am wiser now and know the benefits that can be derived from such a regimen. How long it will take I don’t know. But I will do my best.
 
She set up a schedule for regular physical therapy sessions. Twice a week for a half-hour to 45 minutes at a time. Now I have something to do besides writing this blog after breakfast.
 






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GOOD DAY
It’s Tuesday, August 31, 2021








AUGUST 31, 2021


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Choose Home Care Act Presents Senior Living Opportunities,
Draws Skilled Nursing Backlash

By Chuck Sudo


A bill introduced last month in the United States Senate would allow in-home care alternatives to skilled nursing facilities and poses substantial ramifications for private-pay senior living providers.


Sponsored by Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.), the Choose Home Care Act of 2021 would allow certain Medicare beneficiaries to receive extended Medicare services such as skilled nursing or rehabilitation services in their homes for up to 30 days following hospitalizations or surgeries, in addition to their usual home health allowance.


Additionally, beneficiaries may also receive traditional home health services for longer than 30 days, as needed.


______________________________________


Aging in Place Is Gaining Popularity Among Retirees.
Here's How to Prep Your Home.

By Debbie Carlson


The reasons given for this desire to age in place are myriad, from community ties to nearby family members to tax breaks such as property-tax exemptions. And of course there is the cost: If homeowners can stay in their dwellings, it may be possible to delay or forgo moving into assisted living that could cost tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars. The 2020 Genworth Cost of Care Survey by insurance provider Genworth Financial, for instance, shows the national monthly median cost of assisted living is $4,300.


For people near or in retirement looking to remodel, architects and designers suggest incorporating a flexible design to allow homeowners to comfortably age in place. Adding universal design elements doesn’t require a complete rehab. By incorporating universal design, retirees can plan for longevity, rather than infirmity, says Sarah Barnard of Sarah Barnard Design. “There are a lot of different ways that we can ensure our comfort and independence,” she says.


Even if homeowners aren’t planning a full renovation, they can easily adopt a few simple upgrades that can make it easier to age in place. Here are some tips:


____________________________________


‘Gray Divorce’ Is on the Rise:
How to Strengthen Your Relationship at Any Age

By Becky Upham

The recent news that Bill Gates, 65, and Melinda Gates, 56, are divorcing after 27 years of marriage took much of the world by surprise. The power couple appeared to be the picture of marital stability and longevity, having raised three children while founding and leading the world’s largest nonprofit, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has distributed over $54 billion in grants since its inception.


While we don’t know all the reasons behind the Gates’ decision, it is clear they are not alone in separating after decades together.



Past research published in The Journals of Gerontology found that more than 1 in 4 people getting divorced in the United States are over age 50, and over half of those divorces happen after 20 years of marriage. Pew Research data from 2017 found that the rate of divorce after age 50 nearly doubled from 1990 to 2015. And a study published in June 2020 the Journal of Family Issues found that in people over 50 attitudes shifted to be more supportive of divorce from 1994 to 2012.


________________________________________


Can virtual reality help seniors?
Study hopes to find out

By TERRY SPENCER

Terry Colli and three other residents of the John Knox Village senior community got a trip via computer to the International Space Station in the kickoff to a Stanford University study on whether virtual reality can improve the emotional well-being of older people.


Donning 1-pound (470-gram) headsets with video and sound, the four could imagine floating weightless with astronauts and get a 360-degree tour of the station. In other programs, residents can take virtual visits to Paris, Venice, Egypt or elsewhere around the globe; attend a car rally, skydive or go on a hike.


“I feel great. It is amazing. It is like you are really there,” said Colli, 73, and a former spokesman for the Canadian embassy in Washington.











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GOOD DAY
It’s Monday, August 30, 2021






AUGUST 30, 2021




Physical pain comes early in life. At birth, or soon thereafter. Whether it be toothing pain, a stubbed toe or a paper cut, pain is something we live with. Fortunately, most pain we feel is fleeting. Lasting for only a few minutes or, at worst, a week or two. However, for many of us older folks, the pain we endure is constant and long-lasting. It does not go away with time. In fact, time often exacerbates the condition. We call this “Chronic pain” [1] and it’s something many (if not all) seniors live with every day.
 
According to a study[2]….
 
“People ages 65 and older were more likely to have pain than any other age group; in addition to having a higher prevalence of back pain, 42 percent had arm, hand, or shoulder pain compared with 30.7 percent for the population overall, and 50.3 percent had pain in their hips and legs compared with 36.5 percent of the population.”
 
Think about that for a moment. Most of the older people you come in contact with are in pain. Some of it severe. And yet they seem to carry out most of their daily activities with little difficulty. Or do they? Pain may be the elderly’s little secret.


Most of us old folks don’t like to admit we are in pain. Why? Because when we do, we either get little sympathy (not that we are looking for it) or they want to subject us to a battery of time-consuming, often painful tests which only confirm what we already know. Something is wrong. This leads to one or two options. They will prescribe a pill (adding to the already copious amount of medication we take every day). Or surgery which might or might not cure the problem. in any event, it ain’t going to be fun.

So, what do most of us do? We live with it, that’s what. And, unless the pain gets to a point where we can’t function, we ignore it and go on with our lives. Time is too short to waste on bemoaning our condition or allowing a little thing like an arthritic hip to keep us from a Bingo game or lunch with the girls. Does this make us superhuman? Some of the pain old folks suffer would make young people run to the ER demanding X-rays, CAT scans and MRI’s along with a Rx for Oxycontin or some other opioid. Old people just pop a couple of Motrin or Tylenol and limp off to the next activity.

This does not mean we are impervious to pain or we are not aware of it. Believe me, we feel pain as much as you do. Maybe more so. We just understand it better than young folks. An even embrace it. We wear it as a badge of honor and a sign that we have beaten the odds.
 
Humans were not meant to live to 90 or 100 years old. Our body parts, much like those of an old washing machine, were designed to run for only 60 or 70 years before the gears, pumps, hoses and belts begin to “act up’ and eventually fail. But unlike a Maytag or Whirlpool, our parts are not interchangeable. What works in your body will not work in ours. Unlike a washing machine or your old Dodge, we can’t go to Pep Boys and order a new oil pump. They just don’t make parts for a 1945 YOU anymore.


For me, well, I can’t remember the last time I woke up when something did not hurt. The night does strange things to an old body. Instead of resting and healing, the lack of activity works against us. The joints seem to dry up. The muscles lose their elasticity and tighten, and where did all that phlegm come from? As the day wears on, many of those pains will have gone, leaving me with only a bum hip and a constantly runny nose and the knowledge that this I will have to contend with this again tomorrow. Fortunately, I am well stocked with acetaminophen to get through the day.
 
So, the next time you meet a senior who might be a little cantankerous, grumpy or sullen, remember, they are probably in pain and they are doing their best to cope with it. Just be nice to them and thank your lucky stars they don’t have a gun…….........
 

[1]Chronic pain is long standing pain that persists beyond the usual recovery period or occurs along with a chronic health condition, such as arthritis. Chronic pain may be "on" and "off" or continuous. It may affect people to the point that they can't work, eat properly, take part in physical activity, or enjoy life.
[2]source: https://www.everydayhealth.com/pain-management/more-than-half-of-americans-live-with-pain-according-to-report/



*   *   *


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Reliving high times?
Marijuana use on the rise in older men

By Linda Carroll


Marijuana use is on the rise among baby boomers in the United States, especially men, according to a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.


The findings appear to reflect changing attitudes toward cannabis across the country, study co-author Bill Jesdale, an assistant professor of population and quantitative health science at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worchester, suggested.



Use of the drug increased in older adults in both the states where marijuana has been legalized for recreational use and in the states where it has not, he said. “It seems that something has happened to the country as a whole.”


___________________________________

Most retirees will need long-term care.
These are the best ways to pay for it

By Kate Dore


As retirees live longer, many worry about outliving their savings. However, many older Americans haven’t planned for a looming expense: the cost of long-term care.


The median cost of a private room in a nursing home was $105,850, and in-home care costs were $53,768 to $54,912 annually, according to Genworth’s 2020 Cost of Care Survey.

Of course, these costs vary by location. While private room nursing homes charged a median of $13,535 per month in Massachusetts, retirees shelled out $7,619 per month in Tennessee in 2020, Genworth reported.


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Motor control in older adults may be exacerbated
by age-related executive functioning decline



Aging-US published "Cognition and action: a latent variable approach to study contributions of executive functions to motor control in older adults" which reported that Aging is associated with profound alterations in motor control that may be exacerbated by age-related executive functioning decline.


However, comprehensive studies regarding the contributions of single facets of executive functioning to movement control in older adults are still lacking. A battery of nine neuropsychological tasks was administered to n = 92 older adults in order to derive latent factors for inhibition, shifting, and updating by structural equation modeling. A bimanual task was used to assess complex motor control.


A sample of n = 26 young adults served as a control group to verify age-related performance differences.

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The Top 10 Reasons Americans Do Not Retire
By Marilyn Lewis

You likely assume that people with monster retirement nest eggs got them by having a monster income. Well, while a big income certainly helps, it’s not the only way to retire rich — or, at least, richer.


Little things you do now can lead to lots more money down the road.


For example, here are several simple things successful retirees do, which you should be doing today, that will lead to a richer retirement tomorrow.







TV magician dies from Covid after refusing to have
vaccine because his wife was 'super apprehensive'

By Katie Weston

A TV magician has died from Covid after refusing to have the vaccine because his wife was 'super apprehensive' about getting jabbed.




Tony Junior, who appeared in the Channel 4 reality show Seasiders, was admitted to hospital at the start of his month after contracting the virus.


The entertainer had documented his battle with the disease on social media, saying no one on his critical care ward had received the jab.









Australia’s cane toads evolved as
cannibals with frightening speed
.By Max Kozlov

The list of ‘deadly animals in Australia’ just got a little weirder. The cane toad, a toxic, invasive species notorious for devouring anything it can fit in its mouth — household rubbish, small rodents and even birds — has become highly cannibalistic in the 86 years since it was introduced to the continent, according to a new study. Its counterpart in South America, where cane toads originated, is far less cannibalistic.


The discovery could help researchers to understand the evolutionary underpinnings of how this uncommon and extreme behaviour emerges. Scientists have seen cannibalism evolve in species before, says Volker Rudolf, a community ecologist at Rice University in Texas, who studies the phenomenon. But what’s exciting about this work, he says, is that the researchers are almost seeing it “develop in front of their eyes”, given that the behaviour arose in less than a hundred years — the blink of an eye by evolutionary standards.


“These toads have gotten to the point where their own worst enemy is themselves,” says Jayna DeVore, an invasive-species biologist at Tetiaroa Society, a non-profit organization in French Polynesia, and a co-author of the study, which was published on 23 August in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America1. Scientists estimate that there are well over 200 million of the amphibians in Australia. They have become so abundant, says DeVore, that they face more evolutionary pressure from each other, as they compete for resources, than from anything else in Australia.








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Home Is Where the Health Care Is: New Study Shows Increase
in Number of Homebound Older Adults
While CMS Expands Home Health Reimbursement Model


JAMA Internal Medicine recently published an article finding that the number of homebound adults aged 70 or older more than doubled during the last decade. In 2011, approximately 5% of adults aged 70 or older were homebound compared with 13% in the same age group in 2020. The authors indicate the steep incline in 2020 was likely due to social distancing restrictions and other health precautions taken over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. But the high number of homebound adults aged 70 and older will likely continue throughout 2021 and have potential lasting effects on the overall health of the individuals and their health care delivery.



While telehealth has become a staple in the lives of many post-pandemic (as discussed in a prior blog post), it may not be reaching this vulnerable population. The JAMA article indicated that, of the survey respondents, 27.8% did not have a cell phone, 50.8% did not have a computer, and more than 50% did not email, text or go online in the last month. This means those in this population that need assistance with health care services may need to rely on in-person home care.

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Don't Have Much of a 401k or IRA?
How Senior Citizens Build
A Retirement Fund On A Fixed Income

By Georgina Tzanetos

The question of how to squeeze extra money out of a fixed income budget has long perplexed both advisors and their retiree clients. The answer is of course not simple, but most people fall into one of two categories — those who can draw on retirement accounts and those who cannot.


A whopping 40% of Americans rely solely on Social Security for their income after the age of 65. How? Well, luckily for this group social security will likely be funded for the remainder of the time they will require it. Additionally, Medicare also covers the majority of healthcare costs.

But what if a Medicare supplement is needed? An unexpected health cost? A repair needed on an older home? The reality is, there is always something that extra cash will be needed for. For this group of retirees, the goal of building an emergency fund will be a little more challenging. Here are some ideas for those with a home and those without to boost their savings.



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3 Conversations Solo Agers Should Have
to Pre-Plan Their Funerals



According to Pew Research Center, older people are more likely to live alone in the U.S. than anywhere else in the world. In fact, in the U.S., 27% of adults ages 60 and older live alone. This trend of solo aging shows no sign of slowing down, with only 30% of millennials living with a spouse and child.


While these are all interesting data points, the implications are far more significant. This shift toward solo aging, or adults without children, means thoughtful care must be placed on deciding who will help solo agers with end-of-life decisions, like planning a funeral or memorial service.

It can be overwhelming to think about these decisions and it may be difficult to know where to begin. Resources like Remembering a Life can help. Remembering A Life offers guidance on where to begin the planning process, the kinds of decisions that should be made and the many options available to make a tribute personal and meaningful.


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What to Do When You Feel Like
 You Can't Do Anything


With apologies to the French poet Arthur Rimbaud, I'll remember the summer of 2021 as my own Season in Hell. But I am pleased and proud to report that I pulled through the gloomy time. And I want to assure you that you can, too, should you be unlucky enough to have a similar experience.


Let me explain.

I had ankle surgery on June 8 and was ordered not to put any weight on that area for 12 weeks. Before the surgery, I'd been in the habit of walking about 10 miles a day around Manhattan. So, this prolonged period of inactivity figured to be jarring, to say the least.

I went through an immediate post-surgery period of self-pity, worried that I wouldn't be able to cope with whatever challenges that the world threw at me.






5 Myths About Libido for People Over 50

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Retirees are getting hit by rising prices.
Here's what will soften the blow

By Jeanne Sahadi
Read more  >>  https://edition.cnn.com/2021/08/19/success/high-inflation-low-rates-retirees-feseries/index.html
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Third Pfizer Vaccine Dose Shown To Be 86% Effective
In Preventing Covid Among The Elderly

By Jonathan Ponciano
Read more  >>