Good Day. It’s Saturday, January 29, 2022






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QUARANTINE #3
DAY 6

More of the same



JANUARY 29, 2022



Alarming Increase in Opioid Deaths Among Older Adults​
By Barbara Stepko

It has been called “most consequential preventable public health problem in the United States.” Indeed, the opioid epidemic is a national crisis with devastating consequences. The numbers are an eye-opener. Overdose deaths involving this highly addictive class of drugs — which includes natural opioids prescribed for pain, like morphine and codeine, plus synthetic versions, such as fentanyl and heroin — have increased over six times since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There were an estimated 100,306 drug overdose deaths from opioids in the U.S. during the 12-month period from May 2020 through April 2021, an increase of 28.5 percent from the 78,056 deaths during the same period the year before.



One surprising casualty: older adults. From 1999 tthrough 2019, 79,893 Americans age 55 and older died due to an opioid overdose, according to a new 21-year study published in JAMA Network Open. In 2019 alone, approximately 10,300 people age 55 and older died from opioid overdoses, compared to just over 500 in 1999. And ER visits for opioid misuse increased by nearly 220 percent from 2006 to 2014 for people 65 and older, researchers reported in a 2019 issue of Innovation in Aging.

SAMHSA National Helpline

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's helpline (the Treatment Referral Routing Service) offers information on support groups, treatment options and other assistance: 800-662-HELP (4357).




Too young to retire but at risk for Covid,
older Americans struggle to find work

By Michael Sainato


Elaine Simons, a 61-year-old substitute art teacher in the Seattle, Washington area, was on a 10-month contract and hoping to settle into a more permanent role at the school where she was teaching when the Covid-19 pandemic hit the US in March 2020.


Her school shut down for the remainder of the school year, with Simons having to pack up her classroom and learn to navigate the technology necessary to teach remotely. In June 2020, Simons was informed her teaching contract would not be renewed.

Some 5.7 million workers ages 55 or older lost their jobs in the US in March and April 2020, 15% of workers in an age demographic that has also experienced the vast majority of Covid-19 deaths. The unemployment rate for workers ages 65 and older hit a record rate of 7.5% in 2020.




Even low levels of pollution are killing older people
By Rachel Koning Beals


Senior citizens who breathe in even low levels of pollution from industry, traffic, wildfires and other sources face greater odds of dying earlier as a result, and incremental changes in allowable emissions could save lives, an in-depth study of Medicare recipients shows.



The study, which researchers argue is the first of its kind, was released Wednesday. It tracked some 68.5 million people over four years, and extended to people who live in rural areas and towns with little industry.


Findings suggest that if the federal rules for allowable levels of fine soot had been even slightly more stringent, some 143,000 deaths could have been prevented over the course of a decade. The report’s timing is significant, as the Environmental Protection Agency is mulling tougher pollution regulations right now.




Suffering From Panic Attacks? You Are Not Alone

In October 2021, co-anchor Dan Harris left ABC's "Good Morning America Weekend" after 21 years with the network. In his announcement, Harris expressed his desire to focus his attention on his Ten Percent Happier's meditation company, which includes an app and podcast. Harris became interested in meditation after suffering an on-air panic attack in 2004.


Harris is not the only famous person to suffer from panic attacks. Carson Daly, Selena Gomez, Prince Harry and Stephen Colbert have all been candid about their struggles with panic disorder.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, "An estimated 2.7% of U.S. adults had panic disorder in the past year and an estimated 4.7% of U.S. adults experience panic disorder at some time in their lives."






12 Tips for Getting the Most Out of
Your Trip to a Museum
Jeremy Anderberg


Museums can be intimidating. They often have the reverential feel of a church or library, where you don’t want to talk too loud or get scolded for touching something you shouldn’t. They’re also frequently expensive and sprawling — so chock-full of curios and educational opportunities that you don’t want to miss anything or fail to get your money’s worth, and thus walk around ‘til you’re ready to drop.


Museums, though, should be an experience that everyone delights in and looks forward to. These institutions are the great storehouses of human experience and the natural world. While libraries hold ideas, museums hold the tangible objects of history and of science. They’re one of the few places you can physically go for the exclusive purpose of experiential learning and immersing yourself into the subject matter. So how can you get the most out of a museum without being overwhelmed by it all?

I spoke with Emilee Richardson from the Science Center of Iowa about how to maximize your next visit to one. By following the tips below, you can mitigate the feeling of intimidation and instead take full advantage of everything these great institutions of knowledge have to offer.






What is Nursing Home Abuse or Neglect?
Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/what-is-nursing-home-abuse-or-neglect-6001423/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
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Rural Diabetes Patients Have Worse Health Outcomes
By Peter Urban
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2022/rural-diabetes-care.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-011922-P6-6090185&ET_CID=6090185&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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U.S. Supreme Court Lifts Injunction Against CMS’ Health Care Facility Vaccine Mandate:
What Does This Mean for Your Health Care Facility?

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/u-s-supreme-court-lifts-injunction-5759359/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
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Your eyes hold the key to your true biological age, study finds
By Sandee LaMotte
Read more  >>  https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/18/health/eye-reveals-true-age-wellness/index.html
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The No Surprises Act took effect Jan. 1, 2022 and you
may be surprised what it will, and won't, do to prevent surprise medical bills

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/what-to-know-about-new-surprise-medical-bills-law/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=1e829e7ee0-Tuesday_Newsletter_01_18_22&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-1e829e7ee0-165407981&mc_cid=1e829e7ee0&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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More than half of Americans support a
maximum age limit for elected officials

By Taylor Orth
Read more  >>  https://today.yougov.com/topics/politics/articles-reports/2022/01/19/elected-officials-maximum-age-limit-poll?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter
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How FEPA Protects Michigan’s Elderly
Against Financial Exploitation

Read more  >>  https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/how-fepa-protects-michigan-s-elderly-9753193/?origin=CEG&utm_source=CEG&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CustomEmailDigest&utm_term=jds-article&utm_content=article-link
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Why Dehydration Can Turn Deadly for Seniors
By Cari Shane
Read more  >>  https://www.discovermagazine.com/health/why-dehydration-can-turn-deadly-for-seniors
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Who Wants to Be Frail?
The More Frail an Older Adult Is,
the Higher the Risk for Injuries

Read more  >>  https://www.columbusmonthly.com/story/lifestyle/features/2022/01/21/frail-sudden-unexplained-weight-loss-bmi-frailty-index/6582441001/
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The importance of indoor air quality for
prospective residents of senior living

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/marketplace-columns/the-importance-of-indoor-air-quality-for-prospective-residents-of-senior-living/
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Mediterranean diet associated with a
lower risk of mortality in older adults

Read more  >>  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220120103400.htm
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9 Habits You Can Cultivate to Prevent
Turning into a Grumpy Old Woman

By Michele Meier Vosberg
Read more  >>  https://sixtyandme.com/9-habits-you-can-cultivate-to-prevent-turning-into-a-grumpy-old-woman/
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American College of Surgeons and JAHF join hands
to improve surgical care for older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220122/American-College-of-Surgeons-and-JAHF-join-hands-to-improve-surgical-care-for-older-adults.aspx
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Social Isolation Among Older Adults Linked to Having Fewer Teeth
Read more  >>  https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2022/january/social-isolation-among-older-adults-linked-to-having-fewer-teeth.html
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Feelings of fatigue predict early death in older adults
Read more  >>  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220124084616.htm
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How much can you spend in retirement?​
By Allan Roth
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/retirement/planning-for-retirement/info-2022/how-to-estimate-your-annual-withdraw-strategy.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-SAPLA--CTRL-012022-P2-6092234&ET_CID=6092234&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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Geriatric Emergency Rooms: Better Care,
Better Value and Becoming More Common

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/geriatric-emergency-rooms-better-care/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=a90a1ab669-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_01_20&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-a90a1ab669-165407981&mc_cid=a90a1ab669&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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Co-housing and dementia villages:
Social innovations offer alternatives for long-term care

By Sarah Tranum
Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-01-co-housing-dementia-villages-social-alternatives.html
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Social Security Offices Are Expected to Reopen in March
By Mark Miller
Read more  >>  https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/21/business/social-security-offices-reopening.html
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5 Ways to Prevent Elder Financial Exploitation​
By John Rosengren
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-2021/prevent-elder-financial-exploitation.html?CMP=EMC-MIM-DIS-OTH-CAREGIVING-POSTHOL2022_PENON_T2-1282201-1574106-01202022_VulnerableFraudVictims_HDL_Caregiving-6092418-&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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U.S. senior citizens protected from financial fraud under Scott bill
Read more  >>  https://riponadvance.com/stories/u-s-senior-citizens-protected-from-financial-fraud-under-scott-bill/
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Steven Petrow's Advice On Stupid Things
Not to Do When You Get Old

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/steven-petrow-stupid-things/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=87dccbf6b5-Tuesday_Newsletter_01_25_22&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-87dccbf6b5-165407981&mc_cid=87dccbf6b5&mc_eid=94767a79b9










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NEXT NEW BLOG, MONDAY, JANUARY 31. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


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Good Day. It’s Thursday, January 27, 2022



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QUARANTINE #3
DAY 4


The quarantine remains in effect today, leaving residents here at the A.L.F. to cope with the boredom and the sketchy meals. There has been no sign from our administrator as to our status concerning any new cases of Omicron among us. I guess this is good news.


Hopefully, there will be no extension of the lockdown past Monday. I’ve been keeping busy by “working” on this blog and watching streaming channels like Netflix, Amazon Prime and IMDB-TV. My latest favorite series is from Israel. It’s called “FAUDA.” You can binge on all 4 seasons now. Also, back on is the latest season of “OZARK.” If you liked “Breaking Bad” you’ll love this. For something a little lighter, try “The Impostors.” ……………………….




JANUARY 27, 2022


Social Security Offices Are Expected to Reopen in March
By Mark Miller


The national network of Social Security customer service offices, which were closed nearly two years ago at the start of the pandemic, is on track to reopen on March 30.


The Social Security Administration and unions representing the agency’s work force agreed this week to reopen more than 1,200 offices, contingent on changes in pandemic conditions and further negotiations. Bargaining is set to conclude by March 1, which would allow 30 days to plan for the office re-entry.

“This agreement will allow all the parties to wait and see what happens with the latest wave of the pandemic,” said Rich Couture, chief negotiator for the American Federation of Government Employees, one of three unions representing the agency work force involved in the talks. “Hopefully it subsides, but if it doesn’t, we can take further action to postpone the reopening if necessary.”




5 Ways to Prevent Elder Financial Exploitation​
By John Rosengren


More than 334,000 incidents of elder financial exploitation — the theft or misuse of an older person’s money by someone they know — are reported to authorities in the U.S. each year, causing an estimated $6.3 billion in losses, according to an analysis of federal and state data by Comparitech, a cybersecurity research company.


And those numbers probably underestimate a problem experts say is vastly under-reported.  

But experts also say that in most cases, financial abuse can be prevented before it starts. Take these steps to help protect yourself or a vulnerable loved one from financial exploitation.​

1. Designate someone you trust as your financial power of attorney.




U.S. senior citizens protected from
financial fraud under Scott bill


The bipartisan Empowering States to Protect Seniors from Bad Actors Act, introduced by U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC), aims to protect America’s senior citizens from financial fraud.


“Throughout the pandemic, we have seen a heartbreaking uptick in fraud and scams against our nation’s seniors. In 2020 alone, more than $1 billion was stolen,” said Sen. Scott, ranking member of the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. “I’m proud to join my colleagues in fighting these heinous crimes and protecting older Americans. No senior should have to worry about financial fraud in their golden years.”

Sen. Scott on Jan. 20 signed on as the lead original cosponsor of S. 3529 alongside bill sponsor U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) to create an annual $10 million grant program implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which would work with state securities regulators to protect senior investors.




Steven Petrow's Advice On Stupid Things
Not to Do When You Get Old



When author Steven Petrow was in his 50s and his parents were in their 70s, he began to see them making quite a number of decisions that he thought weren't in their best interests. He started to make notes, which led first to a New York Times column (more on that later) and now a book: "Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old: A Highly Judgmental, Unapologetically Honest Accounting of All the Things Our Elders Are Doing Wrong."

Petrow, now 64, took time to talk with us about his book and what he's learned from writing it. What follows is our interview, edited for length and clarity.


Next Avenue: What did you first notice that your parents were doing that you didn't think was best for them?








How to Qualify for Disability


Social Security uses a strict 5-step process to determine if you qualify for disability. That's true regardless of whether you apply for SSDI or SSI benefits.



If you're questioning how to qualify for disability, you are unlikely to receive benefits if you don't match the criteria listed in the below steps. So let's get to it.

Step 1 - Are you working?















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NEXT NEW BLOG, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, January 26, 2022



Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com








QUARANTINE #3
DAY 2


It was déjà vu again as that knock on my door at about 8am this morning signaled the first full day of yet another lockdown.

The staff is so used to this by now that serving meals off of a cart has become second nature. I guess that’s a good thing. At least there is a semblance of order for them as well as we residents. It’s also good because we know what to expect. We know the food most likely will be third rate (it’s already 2nd rate). The coffee will barely be hot and the pancakes just above room temperature. There’s no butter (I forgot to ask for some) but it doesn’t matter, it wouldn’t melt, anyway. But the food service is just one component of this current lockdown. The hardest part is what it has always been. Isolation, loneliness, and the knowledge this current quarantine could extend beyond the planned seven days.


Of course, being the troopers we are, we will grudgingly go along with whatever they want to do to us. We are used to that, too. Sadly, we have become pawns in this never-ending battle with this virus from hell, and there is very little we can do about it. Because any protest or attempt not to comply is treated with disdain and the protester looked upon as a troublemaker. Therefore, so as not to cause any more grief than we have, we just nod our heads, wear our masks and huddle, alone, in our little cells waiting for the next delicious meal to arrive………………………






JANUARY 26, 2022


Feelings of fatigue predict early death in older adults


How fatigued certain activities make an older person feel can predict the likelihood death is less than three years away, according to research published today in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences by University of Pittsburgh epidemiologists. It is the first study to establish perceived physical fatigability as an indicator of earlier mortality.


Older people who scored the highest in terms of how tired or exhausted they would feel after activities were more than twice as likely to die in the following 2.7 years compared to their counterparts who scored lower. Fatigability was assessed for a range of activities using the novel Pittsburgh Fatigability Scale.

"This is the time of year when people make -- and break -- New Year's resolutions to get more physical activity," said lead author Nancy W. Glynn, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Pitt's Graduate School of Public Health. "I hope our findings provide some encouragement to stick with exercise goals. Previous research indicates that getting more physical activity can reduce a person's fatigability. Our study is the first to link more severe physical fatigability to an earlier death. Conversely, lower scores indicate greater energy and more longevity."



How much can you spend in retirement?​
By Allan Roth

The most difficult and important issue among those near or in retirement is “How much of my savings can I spend each year without running out of money?” Morningstar, the financial research company, has done some outstanding work recently to answer this question. Hint: It’s not the same for everyone.


The research was published in The State of Retirement Income: Safe Withdrawal Rates, by Morningstar experts Christine Benz, Jeffrey Ptak and John Rekenthaler.

Benz told me this is such a difficult issue because of four critical unknowns:




Geriatric Emergency Rooms: Better Care,
Better Value and Becoming More Common


Geriatric ERs are game-changers in health care. Here's why older adults need them and how they have evolved.



A hospital's emergency department is not always the best place for older people. The problems that bring these patients in may be complicated or made worse by long waits, lack of food and even some standard procedures, doctors say.



While younger people generally go to the emergency department after one-time crises, older adults more often show up because of exacerbating events related to underlying conditions, such as a frailty-related fall or shortness of breath due to congestive heart failure, said Dr. Ula Hwang, professor of emergency medicine at Yale School of Medicine and a key researcher in geriatric emergency medicine.




Co-housing and dementia villages:
Social innovations offer alternatives for long-term care

By Sarah Tranum

COVID-19 has amplified existing cracks in the long-term care (LTC) system in Canada. We need socially innovative solutions to help seniors age safely and with dignity.



From co-housing to community paramedicine programs, home-based primary care to publicly funded dementia villages, there is hope on the horizon.

As a social innovation designer, I study complex challenges with the aim to find the common approaches needed to solve these issues and not just manage the symptoms.







Stride (Don't Stumble) Into 2022:
 7 Must-Know Home Safety Tips for Seniors


As people age, many begin to experience physical changes that often limit mobility and reduce dexterity. Though mobility aids and medications are available to help remedy some of the more frustrating and uncomfortable side effects, many seniors need extra accommodations to move freely. Public spaces aside, seniors should prepare themselves to implement safety tips and modifications to their homes to reduce the risk of costly tumbles.



If you’ve noticed signs of mobility deterioration and are looking for ways to stay protected while moving about your space day-to-day, read on for five helpful safety tips for senior citizens.

Select a mobility aid based on your environment
For seniors who struggle with dexterity and day-to-day maneuvering, selecting a comfortable, easy-to-use mobility aid is a fundamental aspect of home safety. However, determining which aid is suitable for you requires careful consideration to ensure you’re able to navigate your space and nearby environments comfortably.












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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, January 25, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com






                                               And yet again…
Another round of COVID
Ends Activities At The A.L.F.


Shortly after breakfast this morning, I was summoned to a meeting with our administrator. For an adult, it’s like being asked to go to the principal’s office. You know it can’t be good news. I was not disappointed.
 
Beside me in front of his desk was our activities' director. I had a suspicion on what he wanted to tell us, so it was not a surprise with the news the facility was to undergo another lockdown, including the suspension of all activities and communal dining. The only difference, this time, it’s being done to keep a minor situation from escalating.

 
It has become quite apparent recently, to even the casual observer, that many of our residents have been confined to their rooms. Our dining room is only half-full at mealtimes, as well as our usually well-attended BINGO games. The reason for those restrictions is that some of our residents have come in contact with infected persons. A few of which are our own residents. In order to stem a further outbreak, our administrator thought it best to keep us away from one another for a few days. Seven days to begin with.  

It would not take somebody with psychic capabilities to foresee this was coming. Absenteeism and ambulances are often a good sign something nasty is afoot. As you know, long-term living facilities like nursing homes and assisted living have been hit particularly hard by this pandemic. This has set in motion some of the most stringent infection control protocols available. Quarantining, primary among them. While effective, these measures put a strain on everybody here. Staff and residents alike. As well as friends and family members whose visitations will end. But we are a hardy lot, much stronger than most people think, and we will endure this latest insult to our freedom as we have done in the past. For me, I’m happy I have this blog and Netflix………
 




JANUARY 25, 2022


Mediterranean diet associated with a
lower risk of mortality in older adults


A greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet which had been assessed through an index made with biomarkers during a 20-year scientific monitoring is associated with a lower mortality in adults over 65. This is one of the main conclusions of a study led by Cristina Andrés-Lacueva, head of the Research Group on Biomarkers and Nutritional & Food Metabolomics of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences of the University of Barcelona (UB) and the CIBER on Fragility and Healthy Ageing (CIBERFES), also formed by the Food Innovation Network of Catalonia (XIA).




The paper, published in the journal BCM Medicine, has been carried out in collaboration with the National Institute on Ageing (NIA) of the United States. According to the conclusions, the analysis of dietary biomarkers in plasma and urine can contribute to the individualized food assessment for old people. The study is based on the InCHIANTI project, conducted in the region of the Italian Tuscany, a study that has been carried out during twenty years in a total of 642 participants (56% women) aged over 65 or more and which enabled researchers to obtain complete data on food biomarkers.

As stated by the UB Professor Cristina Andrés-Lacueva, head of the research group in CIBERFES, "we develop an index of dietary biomarkers based on food groups that are part of the Mediterranean diet, and we assess their association with mortality."




9 Habits You Can Cultivate to Prevent
Turning into a Grumpy Old Woman

By Michele Meier Vosberg

You probably know a grumpy old person. They aren’t fun to be around, and if you let them, they can suck all of the energy out of a room. It is difficult to be in the company of a grumpy old person – male or female – and when we must, we often do it out of obligation.


There are many reasons why someone may become a grumpy old person. Perhaps they are experiencing chronic pain, which can leave them exhausted and frustrated. Perhaps they are lonely. Perhaps they are angry at a particular person, or even at the world which they perceive has not been kind to them.

The Example of My Aunt

I recently had a conversation with my aunt about grumpy old people. We were looking at photos of our ancestors, and she remarked that her great-grandmother was a grumpy old lady. “I don’t know why she was so grumpy, but I never liked going to her house,” she said. “There was never any joy in those visits.”




American College of Surgeons and JAHF join hands
to improve surgical care for older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Today the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Geriatric Surgery Verification (GSV) Program and The John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF) announced their work on a new partnership to improve surgical care for older adults while serving diverse populations across the nation. The GSV Program is designed to ensure appropriate, safe, high-quality surgical care for older adults aligned with what matters most to them.


With support from JAHF, ACS is using the three-year award to evaluate the content, implementation, and outcomes of the GSV Program as it is put into place in real settings, and to make any necessary adaptive changes to foster broad dissemination of this program around the U.S., including rural settings and safety net hospitals. A key part of this work will include developing and incorporating standards for palliative care (a current gap in the GSV Program), and then determine opportunities for alignment with other existing JAHF and ACS quality improvement programs.

We want to make quality surgical care available to all older adults across the U.S. and this project takes a big step in that direction. Our goal for evaluating how the GSV Program is functioning in the real world is to gain insight to adjust and align program standards so the GSV framework truly fits and benefits all hospitals and their older surgical patients-;regardless of a hospital's size, location, population served, or teaching status."




Social Isolation Among Older Adults
Linked to Having Fewer Teeth

Older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to have missing teeth—and to lose their teeth more quickly over time—than those with more social interaction, according to a new study of Chinese older adults led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology.  


“Our study suggests that maintaining and improving social connections may benefit the oral health of older adults,” said Xiang Qi, a PhD student at NYU Meyers and the study’s first author. “The findings align with previous studies demonstrating that structural indicators of social disconnection can have powerful effects on indicators of health and well-being.”

Social isolation and loneliness in older adults are major public health concerns around the world and are risk factors for heart disease, mental health disorders, cognitive decline, and premature death. In some countries, including the United States and China, up to one in three older adults are lonely, according to the World Health Organization. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these issues among older adults, as many in-person interactions have been interrupted to protect older adults from infection.






Divorced?
You can collect Social Security benefits from an ex-spouse.
Here’s how

By Lorie Konish


As you approach retirement, you may find that your ideal life no longer includes your current spouse.


You’re not alone. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of people who have been divorced is highest among those ages 55 to 64.

It may seem callous, but it might be wise for you to pause those plans to end your marriage — because you may receive significant financial benefit for doing so.

You may be able to claim Social Security retirement benefits on your ex-spouse’s work record. But the timing of the divorce itself could be all-important, according to financial planning experts.













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Good Day. It’s Monday, January 24, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







Before a winter storm a few years ago tore it down, there was a sign attached to the transom over our main entrance that read “Welcome Home.” It was put there as a way of greeting newcomers to the world of assisted living, a transition that for many, can be quite traumatizing. At the very least, it’s a strange way to live. You are thrust together with people you don’t know and from all walks of life. 


While some people adjust quite well to their new surroundings, many don’t. And this causes a problem for staff and other residents alike. For the staff, it’s hard enough having to deal with people whose abilities are impaired, but when you add sadness and depression to the mix, things become even more difficult.
 
Most of the folks who come to assisted living centers are old and very set in their ways. And not all of those “ways” are compatible with the lifestyles of others. One miserable person can set the tone for dozens of others, changing the mood of the entire facility. In the nearly 9 years that I have been a resident here, I have observed the atmosphere and character of this place change many times. But never have I seen it as bad as it has been the past few months. And, as much as I hate to use COVID as an excuse for everything, this time it’s true. The long quarantine we were put under last year combined with the one-month lockdown earlier this year really cast a pall over this place that does not want to go away.

We are also under a strict mask mandate, which only adds to the depressing aura and irritability of some of our residents who don’t agree with the current anti-virus protocols. And, just like in the real world where there are “maskers” and “anti-maskers” we have those here causing the irritability level to go sky high. And that the outside temperature has been below freezing, prohibiting people from going outside (the only place where masks are not required) has turned this place into one miserable collection of old people. And now there is something else. In the past week and a half, we have had several people contract the omicron virus or have been in direct contact with those who have. Those residents have been restricted to their rooms for at least a week, turning us into a ghost town with empty lobbies and a near-empty dining room. And if that were not bad enough, four of our residents (including one of my table-mates) [1] have died, all in the last week. While none of the deaths are because of the virus (as far as we know), their passing could not have come at a worse time. It’s probably just as well the “Welcome Home” sign is no longer there. This place doesn’t feel much like home (or anywhere else) right now………………………


[1] Personal note. Jeanne was our table-mate for the last two years. We lost her Friday. She was a lovely lady who faced life heroically. Jeanne suffered from Lupus, the debilitating kind which caused her almost constant pain and difficulty walking. Just getting to meals had become a struggle. She was removed to a hospital about a week ago (the reason is not known) where she succumbed to an unknown illness. Sadly, as most times here, we never have time to say goodbye. They will not tell you which hospital she was taken to or the nature of her illness so we could not talk to her. The only way we were informed of her passing was a picture and briefly worded statement placed on a mantle on the main floor. 
 



JANUARY 24, 2022


More than half of Americans support a
maximum age limit for elected officials
By Taylor Orth

Americans over 60 hold many of the highest offices in the U.S. government. An analysis of the current 117th Congress revealed that it’s the oldest, on average, of any Congress in at least the past 20 years. The average age of U.S. Senators is currently 64 and the average age of U.S. House members is 58. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is 81 and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is 71. Presidents are also being elected at older ages than in the past; at 70, President Donald Trump was the oldest to take office, though his record was quickly surpassed by his successor, President Joe Biden, who took office at age 78.


As the average age of elected officials has risen, some have questioned whether we should restrict individuals over a certain age from holding office. In 2019, former President Jimmy Carter expressed concern over the age of the presidential candidates in the 2020 election, stating: "I hope there's an age limit…If I were just 80 years old, if I was 15 years younger, I don't believe I could undertake the duties I experienced when I was president." Last month, SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk tweeted, “Let's set an age limit after which you can't run for political office, perhaps a number just below 70.”

The U.S. constitution specifies a minimum age requirement of 25 for the House of Representatives, 30 for the Senate, and 35 for presidents, but does not address a maximum. There are mandatory retirement ages for some other jobs, such as airline pilots (age 65) and in most U.S. states, judges. In Canada, Senators may only hold office until age 75. A recent YouGov poll asks Americans whether they think there should be a maximum age limit for elected officials, and if so, what it should be. 




How FEPA Protects Michigan’s Elderly 
Against Financial Exploitation 

In 2021, Michigan passed the Financial Exploitation Prevention Act (FEPA or Act) which took effect last September. FEPA sets forth new requirements on financial institutions to report financial exploitation of vulnerable adults to adult protective services and law enforcement in Michigan, and was a result of work led by the Department of Attorney General’s Elder Abuse Task Force.


The Elder Abuse Task Force was launched by Attorney General Dana Nessel and consists of more than 55 different organizations in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors working together to combat elder abuse.

FEPA requires financial institutions to develop and implement policies, training, and procedures for identifying and reporting the exploitation of their customers, and allows them to freeze customer transactions or assets. Procedures prescribed by the Act included asking questions during a suspicious transaction, or placing a hold on the transaction for up to 10 days to give law enforcement an opportunity to make sure it’s legit. The financial institutions that comply with FEPA receive immunity from criminal, civil, and administrative liability for actions taken in good faith under the Act.




Why Dehydration Can Turn Deadly for Seniors
Cari Shane

During a 2003 heatwave in Europe, over 70,000 people died — most from dehydration. An overwhelming number of these individuals were older adults, in their 70s, 80s and 90s, many of whom lived alone. Gary Egan, a scientist previously affiliated with Melbourne’s Howard Florey Institute, wanted to figure out why some people with access to water could possibly die of dehydration.  


His thirst study, a collaboration with the Research Imaging Center at the University of Texas, suggests that people over the age of 65 actually underestimate how thirsty they are. That’s because, at a certain age, humans lose the sensations that ‘tell them' to hydrate.

Specifically, Egan’s research shows older adults lose their ability to feel thirst because their brains no longer communicate optimally with their bodies. Without a working signal to do so, many seniors, especially those who live alone, simply don’t drink enough water. Egan and his research partners believe that’s what happened in Europe nearly 20 years ago when a significant number of older adults died in the 3-week heatwave.   




Who Wants to Be Frail? 
The More Frail an Older Adult Is, 
the Higher the Risk for Injuries

“Look, you are healthy and everything seems to be going well,” my doctor told me last summer, despite my frustration that I had not dropped the pandemic five pounds I’d gained since March 2020. “It’s just a number.”


His response gave me pause. My whole life has been a battle of the bulge featuring rollercoaster dieting and even a sampling of plus sizes after the birth of my second child, Alex.

Yet, I carefully considered the doctor’s recent comment. Sure, I could dive right back into my diet, measuring and cataloguing every bite. I could deprive myself of all desserts, pizza and bread­—and avoid social functions with all those tempting appetizers. My body just craves certain foods. (Ask my cousin, Steve, about that gingerbread house that went missing a few years back just after my diet had ended in a loss of 35 pounds.)




The importance of indoor air quality for 
prospective residents of senior living

The importance of indoor air quality (IAQ) in senior living and care has received a lot of attention over the past few years. Even before the pandemic, owners and operators were beginning to take notice of the effect that air quality can have on senior living residents.



Although IAQ affects everyone, research shows that older adults are particularly susceptible to the health risks associated with poor air quality due to the aging body’s decreasing ability to compensate for the effects of environmental hazards. Air pollution, which can be two to five times worse inside than outside, can aggravate existing chronic health conditions common among seniors, including asthma, lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes and heart disease, in addition to negatively affecting cognition. Ventilation, on the other hand, can positively affect sleep quality.

Before the pandemic, senior living owners and operators already were beginning to take action, given the aforementioned effects on senior health and quality of life, even if indoor air quality was not top of mind for prospective residents. The pandemic, however, dramatically increased public awareness around the importance of indoor air quality to the health of at-risk groups, such as older adults.






Timely Tips for Filing Your 2021 Tax Return


Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but filing your 2021 tax return may be one frustrating experience — especially if you're expecting to get a refund.




Recently, U.S. Treasury Department officials conceded in a phone call with reporters that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will face "enormous challenges" this filing season; the agency will start accepting federal income tax returns Monday, January 24.

The problems? The IRS is backlogged, many centers that process paper returns have been closed due to COVID-19 and the agency is understaffed (its customer service workforce is down 40% since 2010). What's more, last year's stimulus payments and the expanded child-care tax credit have added filing complexity.










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NEXT NEW BLOG, TUESDAY, JANUARY 25. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


-30-


Good Day. It’s Sunday, January 23, 2022



Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com











How are you feeling? A question that gets asked a lot around here. This is not surprising. One’s health is the major topic among the residents of assisted living facilities, considering most everyone here is here because they have lingering effects of some debilitating illness or injury. So, when someone inquires as to the state of your health, it’s not an idle question and is often answered in more than just a haphazard manner.

At the A.L.F., the simple question “How are you feeling” often elicits a detailed response requiring intricate knowledge of medical terminology. But no fear. Most old folks are “expert” diagnosticians and the mere mention of a symptom will provide one with a complete list of medications, treatments and procedures along with the name of “The best doctor in the world” for your particular complaint.


Personally, I try not to get into details concerning my health. That does not mean I will lie when asked. I have no problem telling anybody exactly how I feel. For example, yesterday if you as asked me I would have said “I feel like s**t.” Because I did. There was not a part of my body that was not signaling distress. Was I sick? No. I’m just old and yesterday I felt every one of my 76 years. Fortunately, as the day wore on and after a handful of Tylenol, my body found its “norm” so instead of being in pain, I just felt lousy. Therefor, if you ask an old person how they feel, don’t be surprised if they answer “Compared to what?” Because the answer to “How do you feel” is as much a matter of relativity as it is an actual ache or pain. “Compared to yesterday, I feel great.” Tomorrow, who knows.

Have a wonderful weekend and we’ll be back on Monday with all new content. Until then…um…feel better?…..



JANUARY 23, 2022


What is Nursing Home Abuse or Neglect?

The statistics about nursing home neglect or abuse are jarring: a national survey of nursing home staff reported that a total of 36% of nursing home residents say that they witnessed a minimum of one incident of physical abuse against an elderly patient in the previous year. 10% of staff committed at least one act of physical abuse toward an elderly patient, and 40% of staff admitted to psychologically abusing patients.


Nursing home abuse can occur in a number of forms, and it is not limited to instances of physical abuse. Other common types of abuse that occur in nursing homes include psychological abuse, financial exploitation, neglect, and sexual abuse. If you are concerned that a loved one has suffered some type of elder abuse, keep reading to learn about what actions you can take.

Types of Nursing Home Abuse...



Rural Diabetes Patients Have Worse Health Outcomes
By Peter Urban


For adult living with diabetes, where you live may influence your chances of avoiding long-term complications including cardiovascular, kidney and eye disease, according to a new study led by researchers at the Mayo Clinic.


Appearing in JAMA Network Open, the neighborhood-by-neighborhood analysis of nearly 32,000 diabetics across three states found disparities in how likely they were to achieve “optimal care” based on five benchmarks known as “the composite D5 metric.”


“Adult patients with diabetes in areas that were more socioeconomically deprived and rural were significantly less likely to attain the D5 metric of optimal diabetes care compared with patients who lived in less deprived and urban areas,” the study concluded.


U.S. Supreme Court Lifts Injunction Against CMS’
Health Care Facility Vaccine Mandate:
What Does This Mean for Your Health Care Facility?

Health care employers are not alone in feeling overwhelmed by the constantly changing legal status of the various federal vaccine mandates.  On Thursday afternoon, the Supreme Court made its rulings on two preliminary challenges to workplace mandates related to the COVID-19 pandemic: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)’s Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) for large employers (100+ employees), and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) vaccine mandate for health care employers.  This article focuses on the current status of CMS’s Interim Final Rule (IFR), issued on November 4, 2021.  The IFR detailed staff vaccination requirements as a condition of receipt of Medicare or Medicaid funds.  CMS estimated that there would be more than 180 million staff, patients, and residents employed or treated at facilities covered by the rule.



Legal Challenges to CMS’s Vaccine Mandate


On November 29, 2021, a federal court in Missouri stayed the CMS vaccine mandate in Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.  On December 15, 2021, a federal court in Louisiana stayed the CMS rule for fourteen additional states: Louisiana, Montana, Arizona, Alabama, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio.  Therefore, at that time, the CMS rule was on hold in the 25 (referred to in this article as the “injunction states”) and enforceable in the rest of the country (referred to in this article as the “non-injunction states”).  A few days later, though, CMS indicated that it would temporarily halt enforcement nationwide.



Your eyes hold the key to your true biological age, study finds
By Sandee LaMotte


The eyes may offer a "window into the soul," as poets say, but they also have a lot to say about your health.


Dry eyes can be a sign of rheumatoid arthritis. High levels of cholesterol can cause a white, gray or blue ring to form around the colored part of your eye, called the iris. A coppery gold ring circling the iris is a key sign of Wilson's disease, a rare genetic disorder that causes copper to build up in the brain, liver and other organs, slowing poisoning the body.

And that's not all: Damage to blood vessels in the back of your eye, called the retina, can be early signs of nerve damage due to diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, even cancer, as well as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.



What to Know About the New Surprise Medical Bills Law


The No Surprises Act took effect Jan. 1, 2022 and you may be surprised what it will, and won't, do to prevent surprise medical bills

Back in December 2020, Congress passed, and then President Donald Trump signed, the No Surprises Act, a bipartisan law aiming to protect patients from unexpected, unwelcome and often costly medical bills. That law finally kicked in Jan. 1, 2022. While it will prevent many surprise medical bills, it won't prevent all of them.


"The No Surprises Act is a step toward empowering patients to make informed decisions and ensures that they pay no more than their fair share," says Gerard Niewenhous, a consumer health advocate in Minneapolis.






What Every Retirement Saver Needs to Know About 2022
By John Waggoner


We all get sentimental from time to time, but unless you hit the lottery or found true love, you probably won't be looking back on 2021 all too fondly. The COVID-19 pandemic is still with us, inflation is rising, and ABBA, inexplicably, dropped a new album.


Although everyone’s retirement is different, 2022 is going to have some big differences from 2021 that will affect almost every retiree and retirement saver to some degree. You’ll see changes in your tax rates and deductions, for example, as well as a bump up in your Social Security check if you're already collecting benefits. You’ll also be able to sock away a bit more in your retirement accounts. Here’s a closer look at what you need to know.
Standard deduction goes up

Let’s start with the good news first: Higher standard deductions for your federal income taxes. Taxpayers get to choose between taking a standard deduction and itemizing their deductions. Deductions lower your taxable income and thus your taxes.







Social Security’s cost-of-living adjustments
spark debate about the appropriate measurement used

By Lorie Konish
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/12/social-security-cost-of-living-adjustments-spark-debate-about-measurements.html
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How A Spouse's Physical Disability Impacts A Relationship
By Francine Russo
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/how-a-spouses-disability-impacts-a-relationship/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=cdd5c09327-Tuesday_Newsletter_01_11_22_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-cdd5c09327-165407981&mc_cid=cdd5c09327&mc_eid=94767a79b9
==================================================================
Senior living must be prioritized in COVID-19 response,
association says in plea to Biden administration

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/senior-living-must-be-prioritized-in-covid-19-response-association-says-in-plea-to-biden-administration/
==================================================================
How to Spot a Company That Values Older Workers
By Gwen Moran
===============================================================
Even in mild cases, many older adults
face mobility issues after COVID-19

By Maria Marabito
Read more  >>  https://www.healio.com/news/primary-care/20220114/even-in-mild-cases-many-older-adults-face-mobility-issues-after-covid19
===============================================================
What nursing homes have been like
with the spread of omicron

By Rhitu Chatterjee
Read more  >>  https://www.npr.org/2022/01/13/1072867399/what-nursing-homes-have-been-like-with-the-spread-of-omicron
===============================================================
Ozone Exposure Linked to Cognitive
Decline in Older Adults, YSPH Study Finds

By Matthew Kristofferson
Read more  >>  https://ysph.yale.edu/news-article/ozone-exposure-linked-to-cognitive-decline-in-older-adults-ysph-study-finds/
===============================================================
Ageism in Dementia Care?
By Robrt L. Pela
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/ageism-in-dementia-care/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=be5126ee50-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_01_12__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-be5126ee50-165407981&mc_cid=be5126ee50&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===============================================================
Can Talk Therapy Help You Have Better Sleep?
By Sari Harrar
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2022/talk-therapy-for-insomnia.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-011722-P9-6084891&ET_CID=6084891&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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Q&A: How assisted living is changing with the times
By Carol Smith  
Read more  >>  https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/01/13/q-a-how-assisted-living-is-change-with-the-times.html
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How Family Mediation Can Help Resolve Elder Care Conflicts
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/can-family-mediation-help-if-youre-arguing-with-your-siblings-about-mom-or-dad/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=be5126ee50-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_01_12__&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-be5126ee50-165407981&mc_cid=be5126ee50&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===============================================================
Stimulus Checks 2022:
When will SS beneficiaries receive
this year's $1,400 payment?

Read more  >>  https://www.marca.com/en/lifestyle/us-news/2022/01/11/61dd6d6346163f0b908b462a.html
===============================================================
Fact-check:
Are retired presidents and legislators
collecting full salaries 'for life'?

Read more  >>  https://www.statesman.com/story/news/politics/politifact/2022/01/17/retired-presidents-legislators-collecting-salaries-for-life/6527927001/
===============================================================
5 Increasing Health Risks for Older Adults Due to Climate Change
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/5-increasing-health-risks-for-older-adults-due-to-climate-change/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=cdd5c09327-Tuesday_Newsletter_01_11_22_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-cdd5c09327-165407981&mc_cid=cdd5c09327&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===============================================================
Not Being Able to Detect Sarcasm Can Be a Sign of Dementia
By Lauren Gray
Read more  >>  https://bestlifeonline.com/lies-sarcasm-dementia-news/
===============================================================
Connecting With Others Tech Free
By Robin L. Flanigan
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/home-family/friends-family/info-2022/connecting-without-technology.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-011822-P8-6087548&ET_CID=6087548&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d





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NEXT NEW BLOG, MONDAY, JANUARY 24. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


-30-





Good Day. It’s Thursday, January 20, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







JANUARY 20, 2022


Fact-check:
Are retired presidents and legislators

collecting full salaries 'for life'?


Viral Facebook post: Retired U.S. presidents and members of Congress collect full salaries “for life."

PolitiFact's ruling: False


Here's why: Elected officials’ post-retirement benefits have long been the target of false or misleading claims.


PolitiFact has repeatedly debunked claims about benefits available to executive and legislative officials when they’re finished serving
.



5 Increasing Health Risks for Older Adults Due to Climate Change


Why climate change will likely expose older adults to more climate-related hazards

With over one-third of California long-term care communities located in areas that are at high risk for fire, it would be difficult to find someone more on edge than a long-term care facility operator during California's fire season.



Unless you are a care manager for older adults in Florida during hurricane season.

While Liz Barlowe of Barlowe & Associates in Seminole, Fla., and her clients have evaded severe storms, she creates a disaster plan with her clients annually. This includes a transfer to a safe place for them to stay with access to medical attention and an ample supply of food, or the presence of a caregiver who can ride out the storm with them in their home.




Not Being Able to Detect Sarcasm Can Be a Sign of Dementia
By Lauren Gray


If You Notice This in Conversations, Get Checked for Dementia


Dementia progressively affects memory and cognition, so it's not uncommon to notice changes in communication in those with the condition. Now, researchers are raising awareness about one particular change that dementia patients frequently display—and you may notice it during conversation. The team of experts from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), explain that when a person is developing dementia, they may become less able to detect one particular social cue in conversation. And for loved ones looking on, it may be the first sign that someone in your life needs a dementia screening. Read on to find out which one dementia symptom may crop up in conversation, and why it's so crucial not to overlook this form of cognitive decline.



The UCSF study, published in 2012 in the medical journal Cortex, found that those with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have difficulty identifying lies and sarcasm in conversation. The research team began by gathering a group of 175 people, half of whom suffered from various forms of neurodegeneration, including FTD. The team showed the subjects videos of conversations in which the speakers would tell lies or use sarcasm, with verbal and non-verbal cues to tip off the viewer to their intentions. The subjects were then asked to analyze the statements and the speaker's intentions through "yes or no" questions about the videos.




Connecting With Others Tech Free
By Robin L. Flanigan


If you’re feeling lonely these days, you’re not alone. Isolation is a big concern for older adults.


Nearly a quarter of adults age 65 and older are considered socially isolated — a statistic associated with a nearly 50 percent increased risk of dementia and other serious medical conditions, according to a 2020 report from the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


Technology is often touted as a way to bring people closer together, but Zoom, FaceTime, Facebook, texting and other high-tech options can sometimes be challenging to use. And in a social media era of heart and smiley-face emojis, online communication can feel less than authentic.



Senior citizens are fuming that Medicare
won’t pay for Covid-19 tests at retailers

By Tami Luhby

Peggy Matthews-Forney cannot believe that, unlike private insurers, Medicare is not reimbursing senior citizens for the home Covid-19 tests they buy at retailers.



“As a Medicare enrollee, I am enraged,” said the retired industry strategist from Denver, noting that more than three-quarters of Covid-19 deaths in the US are among the elderly. “If anyone needs to have these tests paid for, it’s seniors. The ones at the highest risk are seniors.”


As part of its effort to contend with Covid-19, the Biden administration is requiring health insurers to cover the cost of home tests for most Americans with private insurance.






America needs a reboot
By Tara D. Sonenshine



Have you ever emerged from a weekend, distressed by the negativity of the news taking place in the U.S., and thought: Maybe it’s time to give up on America?




This past weekend, we heard about more school closings and hospital shortages due to an ongoing pandemic. We witnessed acrimonious political rhetoric post Jan. 6. And a horrific hostage-taking at a Texas synagogue.

If you occasionally flirt with the idea of running to another country, you are not alone.












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NEXT NEW BLOG, FRIDAY, JANUARY 21. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


-30-



Good Day. It’s Wednesday, January 19, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







I Just Want Honest Food

Foodie has been away from these pages for a while. I’d like to tell you I was traveling the world looking for new food ideas and tasting exotic cuisine, but I can’t. Like you, Foodie is a victim of our times. The pandemic has kept me close to home. And by “home” I mean the assisted living facility where I live. However, that does not mean I have not been busy thinking, talking, writing, criticizing and eating food. Unfortunately, all of my meals (save for a few that I have made myself and some Chinese food delivery) are those provided to me. And, while the food here has improved considerably, one very important ingredient has been left out. Honesty.

I’m a simple man who likes simple things. And what I put in my mouth is no exception. But just because I enjoy simple meals, does not imply they should not be properly cooked. Take, for example, one of humanity’s greatest food inventions. Spaghetti and meatballs.



Even in its simplest form, it’s good. It’s good even if you get your spaghetti from a box and your sauce from a jar. And, if you can follow a simple recipe, anyone can put together a decent meatball. So you would believe. However, if you are trying to be “cute” or taken to skipping a few details (and ingredients) in the name of being healthy or economical, you are not only a bad cook, but you are dishonest as well. Sadly, more often than not, some of the food served here is a fraud or, at best, misleading.

Here’s the problem. And it’s not only a problem here, but in most long-term care facilities.
 
When you go to a restaurant and order a meal from the menu, you have a good idea of what it will taste like, even if you have never been to that establishment before. You expect the food to fit the pallets of the typical patron in the area where the restaurant is located.
 
People in Hong Kong who order a delivered pizza might be surprised how different it tastes from a pizza ordered from a New York pizzeria. Both are honest because they reflect the norms of the community. But all that goes out the window in an A.L.F. Instead of catering to the tastes of the community, they have to cater to the well-meaning, but misguided intentions of a dietitian and the DOH. And anytime bureaucrats get near something sacred like food, they will f**k it up.

Catering to the lowest common denominator.
 
The “lowest common denominator” where food is concerned means those people who are on restricted diets. And by “restricted” I mean that everything that can be done to make a meal as bland, colorless and unappetizing as possible and still call it food will be done.


There’s no salt and no spices. The very essence of most food. And, because they are trying to stretch a pound of meat and a gallon of sauce to fit a budget, the meatballs are mostly filler and the sauce watered down. This is dishonest food at its best (or worst). It tastes nothing like we remember it. Serving food like this to seniors is doing them a gross disservice. Why should people in the sunset of their years be subjected to food they don’t like and, subsequently, won’t eat? Is this really being responsible? I submit it’s not. And is actually doing more harm than good. It is better for older people to thrive than to waste away? And if that means adding a little salt to a salt-free diet or some garlic to make the meal taste like home, then do it and to hell with what no-nothing good-doers say. It’s better to leave the table with a full belly and a smile on your face than a half-eaten meal that makes you miserable for the rest of the day.

Does anybody have the number for Grub-Hub?………





JANUARY 18, 2022


Can Talk Therapy Help You Have Better Sleep?
By Sari Harrar

If bedtime’s a battle with insomnia instead of a refreshing slide into dreamland, here’s news: A short course of therapy — in person, over the phone or online with video — can retrain your brain for better sleep. “Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia [CBT-I] is as effective as sleeping pills in the short term and more effective in the long term,” says Michelle Drerup, a sleep psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic Sleep Disorders Center. “It addresses the factors behind insomnia rather than putting a Band-Aid on it.”


For many, it works. Six CBT-I sessions helped more than 60 percent of people in their 30s through 60s with insomnia get improvements like falling asleep faster, waking up less often, logging more sleep and feeling less tired and anxious during the day in a 2020 University of Michigan study. A 2021 study of 29 people in their 60s through 90s found similar results, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report. The findings are noteworthy for older adults, who face a higher risk for sleep problems and make frequent use of prescription and over-the-counter snooze aids that raise risk for confusion, falls, urinary trouble, constipation and even memory problems. Other recent studies find it works for insomnia in cancer survivors, during menopause and in people with chronic arthritis pain — and can slash risk for insomnia-related depression by 51 percent in older adults, too.



Q&A: How assisted living is changing with the times
By Carol Smith  

Belmont Village Green Hills is among the largest assisted-living facilities in the Nashville area, ranking third on our List based on gross resident charges in 2020.

We had a few questions for Belmont Village’s founder and CEO, Patricia Will.



How has the pandemic affected senior living and the choices people are making in how and where they age? Among many lessons learned, the pandemic highlighted the importance of three key factors that promote the well-being of aging seniors: socialization, programming and access to telehealth.




How Family Mediation Can Help Resolve Elder Care Conflicts

Mediators can offer constructive, non-judgmental solutions to siblings when it comes to sharing the responsibilities of caring for parents



After Laura Bushman Schneider's father died three years ago, she started to worry about her mother, who was living alone for the first time and showing signs of mild cognitive impairment. Schneider, who lives near her mother in Long Island, has good relationships with her two sisters and brother, but they're scattered around the country — in New Jersey, Maine and California.


That made it challenging to share the responsibilities of caring for their older mother, and tensions rose as they argued over whether she should be moved to an assisted living facility.




Stimulus Checks 2022:
When will SS beneficiaries receive
this year's $1,400 payment?



In these first weeks of 2022, congress has received pressure from the Senior Citizens League (TSCL) as they push for another one-off $1,400 Social Security stimulus payment for seniors. This is because of the uncertainty in the United States following a rise in COVID-19 infections since the emergence of the new, albeit milder, Omicron variant. This payment would essentially act as a fourth stimulus check.


The 2022 cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) is increasing by the highest amount in four decades, pushing many seniors into a higher tax bracket, so this stimulus check will theoretically help offset extra costs.


Over the last 21 years, "COLAs have raised Social Security benefits by 55 percent," affecting seniors due to general costs outpacing the increase with the COLA, as shown by the fact that costs for housing and healthcare increased 118% and 145%, respectively.






What to Know About Kidney Transplants

In the summer of 2020, though, Ployhar, took the four-week backpacking trip he'd dreamed of on California's John Muir Trail. The trek was made possible with the one piece of equipment Ployhar had been missing: a working kidney.



"After a transplant, your life is your own again."


On New Year's Day, 2020, Ployhar got the call. A matching kidney was available. How fast could he be at the hospital? He and his wife cut short a holiday visit to get there at 10 p.m. for one more dialysis session before transplant surgery at 7 a.m. the next day.














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NEXT NEW BLOG, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20. 2022




©2022 Bruce Cooper


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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, January 18, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com






JANUARY 18, 2022



Opioid overdose deaths surge among older adults
By Katie Adams

The opioid epidemic has not spared older Americans, as overdose deaths among Americans ages 55 and older have steadily increased from 1999-2019, according to a study published Jan. 11 in JAMA Network Open.



The study examined opioid overdose deaths among Americans ages 55 and older that occurred between Jan. 1, 1999, and Dec. 31, 2019.


The researchers found that the annual number of overdose deaths among older Americans increased from 518 in 1999 to 10,292 in 2019. During the period studied, 79,893 older Americans died from an opioid overdose. Eighty percent of these people were between ages 55 and 64.



COVID-19 causes mobility, physical declines in older adults
By Brian P. Dunleavy
 
Many adults age 50 years and older sickened with COVID-19 experience declines in mobility and the ability to perform day-to-day physical activities up to eight months after infection, a study published Wednesday by JAMA Network Open found.


This is true even for those who do not suffer symptoms serious enough to require hospital treatment, the researchers said.

Among nearly 3,000 older adults in Canada who tested positive for COVID-19, one in four reported worsening ability to engage in physical activity up to eight months later, the data showed.


Anyone at age 65 should evaluate how — or if —
Medicare will fit into their health-care coverage. Here’s why

By Sarah O’Brien

The rules for Medicare enrollment when you already have workplace insurance depend partly on how many employees your company has. For Part B, the late-enrollment penalty is 10% for each 12-month period you should have been enrolled. For Part D, the penalty is 1% of the national base premium — $33.37 in 2022 — for each month you didn’t have Part D or creditable coverage and should have.


If you’re uncertain whether you need to sign up, it’s worth checking with your human resources department or your insurance carrier.

It’s not just retirees who need to think about Medicare.

Anyone who plans to keep working when they reach the eligibility age of 65 should evaluate how — or if — Medicare will fit into their health-care coverage.




At This Affordable Senior Living Community, Volunteering Will Be Required
Opus Newton is a new idea to counter the trend of
senior living that's out of reach for the middle class

By Sally Abrahms

Linda Helfet, 78, and her husband Bill Hilliker, 86, always thought they would grow old in their beloved Watertown, Mass., condo just outside Boston. But with one son living in Oregon and the other in Georgia, they've begun to worry. "What's going to happen when either Bill or I are gone?" says Helfet. "One of us will be all alone."


Thinking about the high cost of health care as they age has been equally unsettling for the couple.

Helfet and Hilliker toured a luxury long-term care community where friends live. The hefty buy-in cost and monthly fees were steep. And, asks Helfet, "Who needs five restaurants and someone to wait on me?"




Four factors in midlife may predict later
health declines in women

Examining a woman's health in midlife can predict her health decades later, researchers say.



Four specific factors -- higher body mass index (BMI), smoking, arthritis and depressive symptoms -- at age 55 are associated with clinically important declines in physical health 10 years later, a new study reports.

"Age 55 to 65 may be a critical decade," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Solomon, of the division of rheumatology, inflammation, and immunity at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.








7 Must-Know Home Safety Tips for Seniors
By Jack Martin

As people age, many begin to experience physical changes that often limit mobility and reduce dexterity. Though mobility aids and medications are available to help remedy some of the more frustrating and uncomfortable side effects, many seniors need extra accommodations to move freely. Public spaces aside, seniors should prepare themselves to implement safety tips and modifications to their homes to reduce the risk of costly tumbles.



If you’ve noticed signs of mobility deterioration and are looking for ways to stay protected while moving about your space day-to-day, read on for five helpful safety tips for senior citizens.


Select a mobility aid based on your environment


For seniors who struggle with dexterity and day-to-day maneuvering, selecting a comfortable, easy-to-use mobility aid is a fundamental aspect of home safety. However, determining which aid is suitable for you requires careful consideration to ensure you’re able to navigate your space and nearby environments comfortably.











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ALL © 2022 BRUCE COOPER
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Good Day. It’s Monday, January 17, 2022




Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com












I prefer to keep my predictions about politics to a bare minimum. Mainly because they more often than not come true. The last one I did was in 2020, when I correctly predicted the outcome of the presidential election. And we all know how that turned out. Therefore, you can understand my hesitation to predict anything. But here’s one thing I can fearlessly predict. On this anniversary of Martin Luther King’s birth, the Republican party will present one face to the world while showing another to the people they pander to. They will, on one hand, pretend to be the defenders of civil rights (they like to bring up the fact that Lincoln was a Republican, a lot) while on the other they will do anything and everything to keep minorities from voting by enacting inane voting regulations in the guise of “reform.” Anytime you hear the word “reform” coming from the mouth of a Republican nowadays, you can be sure there is an ulterior motive.

And if they can’t get the voting legislation to go their way, they will find another way to make sure “them darn liberals” won’t find it easy to cast a ballot. Gerrymandering a district, so one side becomes the majority is a popular way to do this. But ask any Republican if that isn’t just a tiny bit racist and they will look at you with righteous indignation, astounded that you would think that. They will blatantly tell national TV audiences how they are the party of the working man. The blue-collar worker, the guy at the Ford plant or the cashier at Walmart’s. And yet when the topic of higher minimum wages comes up, it’s a Republican that will side with his corporate pals to make sure that blue-collar workers never get ahead.



There will be many rallies and celebrations today, some in the so-called “Red States.” And like most, they will feature politicians making speeches. What do you think of the chances that a Republican will stand at a podium in front of microphones and TV cameras and sing the praises of a major figure in the Civil Rights Movement?

There might be one brave Republican sole who has decided that going after the minority vote might help his chances of winning an election. He may actually make a speech today supporting civil rights and decry changing voting regulations. But you can be sure he will deny ever making such a speech when questioned by his Republican constituents the next day.

Of course, this is nothing new for Republicans of late. They have shown how two-faced they are ever since Trump lost the election and then again when Trump failed to act quickly to quell the riot at the Capitol on January 6, 2021. Both Mitch McConnell and Kevin McCarthy both condemned Trump the very next day. And they did so very publicly. Now, a year later, they have become amnesia victims refusing to even speak to the January 6th committee or remembering they ever said what they said

Republicans have become the party of Trump and have taken their cues from him. They have seen how lying and denying truth can get you votes if you find the right people to pander to. Trump found that dirty little secret hidden in the hearts of many Americans and exploited it. And that secret was that racism, anti-Semitism and white supremacy exists, in strength, in the U.S. And those people needed a voice. It didn’t matter if the person behind that voice could not care less about those people. They voted, and they will vote for anybody who walks the walk and talks the same talk they do.

If you see any Republicans making any statements which appear to be in support of Civil Rights or even commenting favorably about Martin Luther King this week, be sure to keep a record of that event. It will come in handy when they deny they said it when they’re asked to speak at the next Trump rally………………………..
 




JANUARY 17, 2022




Even in mild cases, many older adults
face mobility issues after COVID-19

By Maria Marabito

Middle-aged and older adults with confirmed, probable or suspected COVID-19, even mild cases, experienced worsened mobility and functioning outcomes following infection, according to findings published in JAMA Network Open



“The risk for mobility problems with COVID-19 was higher for older people, those with multiple chronic conditions, lower income, living in an apartment or condo (vs. a house), low physical activity and higher nutritional risk,” Marla K. Beauchamp, PhD, an assistant professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University in Canada, told Healio. “Although these factors alone did not account for the extent of mobility problems we observed, it does give us a sense of who we might need to target for rehabilitation and prevention.”


Beauchamp and colleagues conducted a population-based study using data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. They extracted information from COVID-19-related questionnaires completed by 29,559 adults aged 45 to 85 years between September 2020 and December 2020. The researchers compared the data that were collected during this period with pre-pandemic data from 2015 to 2018.




What nursing homes have been like
with the spread of omicron

By Rhitu Chatterjee

COVID-19 infections are sky-rocketing in nursing homes. Deaths among residents are only a fraction what they were in 2020. But staffing shortages have worsened and are affecting the care of residents.



The Supreme Court's ruling today on the Biden administration's COVID vaccine mandates is a mixed decision. The court struck down the mandate for large workplaces but upheld the mandate for health care facilities that receive federal funds like Medicare payments. In effect, this applies to almost every hospital and nursing home in the U.S.

NPR health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee joins us now to talk more about nursing homes, which, like hospitals, have been battered by the omicron surge. Hey, Rhitu.




Ozone Exposure Linked to Cognitive
Decline in Older Adults, YSPH Study Finds

By Matthew Kristofferson

A new, large-scale study led by scientists at the Yale School of Public Health has established a robust link between long-term ozone exposure and an increased risk of cognitive impairment in older adults.


Air pollution has long been considered a major risk factor for an aging society. Fine particulate matter floating in increasingly high concentrations around the globe can lead to dementia and other cognitive disabilities, and those affected can easily burden health care systems in areas with populations that skew older. But beyond airborne particles, little is known about the way in which other pollutants can pose a similar danger.

For their study, which was published in Environment International in January 2022, the researchers instead chose to focus on ambient ozone, a highly reactive gas that exists in much of smog at ground level. They then observed health outcomes in nearly 10,000 older adults across China and analyzed the extent to which long-term ozone exposure may have impacted their cognitive ability over time.




Ageism in Dementia Care?
By Robrt L. Pela

This writer has been thinking about early-onset dementia and whether long-term care facilities are ready for Gen X residents

"This is where we have our daily game of Mingle Bingo."


I'm virtual-touring a memory care facility in Phoenix, the city where I live.
A woman in her fifties talking to a doctor about dementia diagnosis. Next Avenue, ageism, dementia
Credit: Getty

"And around the corner here is where our residents like to just, you know, hang out," whispers Kathleen, the facility supervisor who's leading me on this virtual tour. She's whispering, I presume, because the three older care-home residents she's captured with her cell phone are all fast asleep, slumped or reclining in giant mauve Barcaloungers. Behind them, a subtitled rerun of "I Love Lucy" silently plays on an enormous wall-mounted TV.







Overlooked Parts of the Body 
That Need Exercise

By Michele Wojciechowski


A few years ago, I had a pain in my right thigh. I assumed I had pulled a muscle and soldiered on.


Until, that is, it interfered with my playing the bass drum on my drum kit. That’s when I finally saw a physical therapist.


Turns out, the pain wasn’t coming from my thigh. It was stemming from my hip area — more specifically, from my glutes. Only after many sessions with my physical therapist and exercising at home was I back to pounding away on the skins pain-free.

While many people age 50 and older know they need to focus on their arms, legs and back when working out, they are most likely ignoring other parts of their bodies. You probably are, too.

Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2022/forgotten-strength-exercises.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-011222-P5-6073953&ET_CID=6073953&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d









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Good Day. It’s Sunday, January 16, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com









Doing what I do most days, following lunch, I pressed the “down” button on my recliner to prepare for an afternoon of nothing. Nothing, unless you consider napping something, is one of the major activities around here for me and many of my fellow residents. We are, you see, among that select group of Americans who are retired.[1] That means we don’t have a job, have little or no responsibilities, answer to very few people and are perceived, by the rest of the world, to be lucky SOBs. That could not be further from the truth. Because, for many seniors, retirement is not the paradise we were hoping for. Actually, it can be downright lousy.



Before you think that everything you were told about retirement has been a lie perpetuated by unscrupulous companies as a ploy to get rid of older (and more expensive) workers, let me clarify my statement by saying “I love not having to go to a job every day where I was forced to toil just to keep a roof over my head and food in my belly.’’ Not having to listen to the inane complaints of other employed people who hate their jobs even more than I did is a godsend. Getting rid of the stress alone was enough to make me happy I’m retired. So, why am I having difficulty with this whole retirement thing? It’s not all it’s cracked up to be.

Unlike our European counterparts, Americans do not know how to stop and smell the flowers. We have, from a very young age, been told that having a job and all that comes with it is our destiny and the only way we will find true meaning in life. We are defined by what we do for a living rather than how we live our lives. Conversely, Europeans understand the value of free time and the effect it has on our psyche and our family life. [2] And this makes us miserable during retirement. We do not know what to do with our free time. And then there is the concept we have that because we no longer earn a wage, we are of no value to society. Therefore, we invent things to make us feel useful. Like volunteering. The U.S. has the most volunteers per capita than any other industrialized nation[3]


I must admit I had these feelings early in my retirement. That’s probably because I was forced into an early retirement after the company I was with closed all of their branch offices. I was only 62, in relatively good health and not enough money to do all I would have liked to do. Now, nearly 15 years later, I see things differently. My priorities have changed. Instead of the need to collect more stuff (as one has the tendency to do when one is employed) all I want now is peace. And good health. The peace part is easy. I have simplified my life and have removed most of the stress. The health part is not as easy. Time, it seems, has other ideas. I know I’m running out of it and the chances are that my present health concerns will go away are slim to none. But I try not to think about that. In fact, I give the future very little thought at all. The one thing I’ve learned in retirement is you have little control over what is coming, so stop fretting over it.
 
This past week has been one of the most devastating for us here at the A.L.F. We have lost four of our residents. (All from non-COVID related illnesses). These were people we lived with and saw every day. And to no longer have them with us must give one pause. Hopefully, they departed this life with peace in their minds and love in their hearts. Because, in the end, that’s the best we can hope for………  

[1]As of August 2021, the U.S. Social Security Administration reported that there are about 46.9 million retired workers in the United States, making up about 14% of the total population

[2]
[3] Followed by New Zealand, Canada, Norway and Australia




January 16, 2022



Social Security’s cost-of-living adjustments
spark debate about the appropriate measurement used

By Lorie Konish

Social Security beneficiaries are receiving the highest cost-of-living adjustment in decades, thanks to rising inflation.

That 5.9% increase went into effect in January.


Prices have continued to climb higher since that change was announced in October.

The Consumer Price Index, a government measure for price changes for certain goods, climbed 7% in December from the previous year — the fastest increase since 1982, according to data released Wednesday.

Excluding food and energy prices, the index was up 5.5% from the previous year.



How A Spouse's Physical Disability Impacts A Relationship
By Francine Russo

Despite his precarious balance, Linda's husband refuses to use his walker or even the non-skid rugs in the bathroom. Instead, he pushes his feet on a towel along the wet tiles. Her 87-year-old husband of 50 years insists he's fine even though in the past, she says, he has confessed, "'I can't acknowledge this is where I am in my life'."


Linda, a 74-year old mental-health clinician in the Washington, D.C., metro area knows she's being "bitchy." She says: "I'm past the stage of 'I know this is hard.' Now it's: 'You fall and you're dead!'"
Spouse's disability, relationship
Credit: Adobe Stock

Conflicts like these are the most obvious sign of an intimate relationship battered by the emotions swirling around a partner's physical disability, including fear of dependency, loss of identity and a potentially diminished relationship. The magnitude of what these older couples face challenges even the most loving couples.




Senior living must be prioritized in COVID-19 response,
association says in plea to Biden administration


Calling it “unacceptable” that older adults “continue to be left behind for critically needed” COVID-19 support, Argentum on Monday called on the Biden administration to prioritize senior living communities for testing, vaccines and treatments.


In a letter to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra, Argentum President and CEO James Balda implored the administration to directly supply COVID-19 tests to senior living communities, help administer COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, and target more federal financial relief to the industry.

“Unfortunately, time and again, America’s seniors have been left behind for COVID-19 support,” Balda wrote. “It took six months into the pandemic for their caregivers to even have access to federal relief, and still that relief is substantially less than other providers who aren’t serving on the frontlines have received.”




How to Spot a Company That Values Older Workers
By Gwen Moran

When you’re considering making a move to a new company, it’s a good idea to investigate the culture as you do your research. Because while the labor market is tight, some companies may still be hesitant to hire older workers, says Amanda Augustine, a career expert at TopResume, a career and resume consultancy.


Here are seven ways to find companies that value older people.

1. Start with their website

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a website can tell a pretty comprehensive story about a company and its leadership. Joe Mullings, chairman and CEO of search firm the Mullings Group, advises perusing the website to see whether photos represent a diverse group of employees, including older ones, and how many of the staff and leadership photos are of older workers. Look for signs that the company values diversity in all of its forms.

2. Scout their social media....


 






A life-enhancing elixir?
Olive oil linked to lower death risks from Alzheimer's disease, all causes
By Mike Snider


Adding olive oil to your diet could lower your risk of Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and cancer, new research suggests.



The health benefits of olive oil have long been touted – olive oil is packed with healthy fats, nutrients and antioxidants – and it's a vital ingredient of the Mediterranean diet. This new research, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests the potential of including olive oil in your diet.

The study, led by researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, studied the health and diet of 60,582 women and 31,801 men in the U.S. from 1990 to 2018.






Many U.S. Adults Report Pandemic-Related Sleep Disturbances
Read more  >>  https://consumer.healthday.com/half-of-adults-experience-sleep-disturbances-during-covid-19-2656199407.html
===============================================================
What to Do When You Receive a Surprise Medical Bill
By Rachel Nania
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/health-insurance/info-2021/surprise-medical-bills.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-010522-P2-6053238&ET_CID=6053238&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
===============================================================
4 of the Biggest Changes for Medicare in 2022​
By Dena Bunis
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/medicare-insurance/info-2022/changes-in-2022.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-HLTH-MEDICARE--NMCTRL-010522-TS1-6053556&ET_CID=6053556&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
===============================================================
World's oldest person turns 119
and hopes to reach her 120th birthday

By Cortney Moore
Read more  >> https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/worlds-oldest-person-turn-119-kane-tanaka
===============================================================
Older Americans Can Expect Higher Drug Prices in 2022
Read more  >>  https://www.publicnewsservice.org/2022-01-03/consumer/older-americans-can-expect-higher-drug-prices-in-2022/a77225-1
===============================================================
Why cloth masks might not be enough
as Omicron spreads

By Clare Ansberry
Read more  >> https://www.livemint.com/science/health/why-cloth-masks-might-not-be-enough-as-omicron-spreads-11641212534433.html
===============================================================
Express Yourself: All about the Older Americans Act
By Wally Pearce
Read more >>  https://www.wintersexpress.com/express-yourself/express-yourself-all-about-the-older-americans-act
===============================================================
The Best Pets to Get for Lonely Older Adults
Read more  >> https://kiowacountypress.net/content/best-pets-get-lonely-older-adults
===============================================================
Northwestern to launch new institute to study aging
By Lisa Schencker
Read more  >>  https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-northwestern-longevity-institute-aging-20220104-2sksqyisozeudgdzjmexdbkehu-story.html
===============================================================
Beyond Britney: Abuse, Exploitation, And Death I
nside America’s Guardianship Industry

By Heidi Blake
Read more  >>  https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/heidiblake/conservatorship-investigation-free-britney-spears?utm_source=Next%2BAvenue%2BEmail%2BNewsletter&utm_campaign=21b5e8a322-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_01_05_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-21b5e8a322-165407981&mc_cid=21b5e8a322&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===============================================================
Retire to a college campus?
Senior communities see benefits
 to intergenerational living

By Sarah Matusek
Read more  >> https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2022/01/retire-to-your-alma-mater-retirement-communities-see-benefits-to-campus-living.html
==============================================================
Senior living occupancy increases for second quarter in a row;
delta variant has little effect

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/senior-living-occupancy-increases-for-second-quarter-in-a-row-delta-variant-has-little-effect/
==============================================================
How to Help a Loved One Deal With Mobility Problems
By Tanya Bricking Leach
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/health/info-2019/mobility-problems.html?CMP=EMC-MIM-DIS-OTH-CAREGIVING-POSTHOL2022_PENON_T1-1282201-1574402-01062022_TroubleGettingAround_HDL_Caregiving-6055674-&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
==============================================================
Omicron is just starting to hit U.S. regions
with unvaccinated senior citizens

By Peter Weber
Read more  >>  https://theweek.com/coronavirus/1008797/omicron-is-just-starting-to-hit-the-parts-of-the-us-with-the-most-unvaccinated
==============================================================
Many seniors taking far more prescription drugs
than they actually need, study suggests

Read more  >>  https://www.studyfinds.org/prescription-drugs-older-patients/
==============================================================
If You Notice This While Shopping, Get Checked for Dementia
By Lauren Gray
Read more  >>  https://bestlifeonline.com/shopping-confusion-symptom-of-dementia-news/
==============================================================
Omicron May Already Be Peaking in East Coast States
By Zachary Mack
Read more  >>https://bestlifeonline.com/news-omicron-peaking-states/?utm_source=nsltr&utm_medium=email&utm_content=news-alaska-airlines-beverage-service&utm_campaign=launch
==============================================================
Sanders Demands Refunds for Seniors Hit by Medicare Premium Hike
By Jake Johnson
Read more  >>  https://www.commondreams.org/news/2022/01/12/sanders-demands-refunds-seniors-hit-medicare-premium-hike
==============================================================
Government may scale back Medicare Part B premium increase
By Sarah O’Brien
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/10/government-may-scale-back-medicare-part-b-premium-increase.html
==============================================================
Nursing homes are in critical need of staff
By Blake Farmer
Read more  >>  https://www.marketplace.org/2022/01/11/nursing-homes-are-in-critical-need-staff/
==============================================================
It costs what?
Sticker shock and finding ways to pay for senior care

By Carrie Harpster
Read more  >>  https://sports.yahoo.com/costs-sticker-shock-finding-ways-133709445.html
==============================================================
$2.5M judgment against operator for resident’s ‘serious and painful’ injuries
results in changes to practices, contracts

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/2-5m-judgment-against-operator-for-residents-serious-and-painful-injuries-results-in-changes-to-practices-contracts/








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Good Day. It’s Thursday, January 13, 2022


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Sanders Demands Refunds for Seniors Hit by Medicare Premium Hike
By Jake Johnson

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Tuesday demanded refunds for seniors who have been hit by the 2022 Medicare premium hike after federal health officials recommended limiting the program's coverage of Aduhelm, the unproven and expensive Alzheimer's drug responsible for a large chunk of the premium increase.

In a statement, Sanders said CMS officials' preliminary decision Tuesday to restrict coverage of Biogen's Aduhelm to patients taking part in approved clinical trials was "an important step forward." CMS' final decision on the drug is expected by April.

"Americans should not have to pay an outrageous price for a drug that their tax dollars helped develop."




Government may scale back Medicare Part B premium increase
By Sarah O’Brien

There’s a chance that your Medicare Part B premiums for 2022 could be reduced.


Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra on Monday announced that he is instructing the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to reassess this year’s standard premium, which jumped to $170.10 from $148.50 in 2021.

About half of the larger-than-expected increase was attributed to the potential cost of covering Aduhelm — a drug that battles Alzheimer’s disease — despite not knowing yet to what extent the program would cover it. Either way, the manufacturer has since cut in half its estimated per-patient price tag to $28,000 annually from $56,000 — meaning Medicare’s cost estimate was based on now-dated information.




Nursing homes are in critical need of staff
By Blake Farmer


Patsy Wilkerson and Ashley Rose have a running joke that keeps them chuckling during long days working at Knollwood Manor in Lafayette, Tennessee. They’re both occupational therapists working at a nursing home that is so short-staffed that they’ve ended up having to help change bed sheets and feed patients — duties of certified nursing assistants.


“We’ve dropped down,” Wilkerson said of their place in the nursing home hierarchy. “We’re CNA assistants.”


Since the pandemic began, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have lost more than 400,000 jobs, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And they haven’t found the bottom yet.




It costs what?
Sticker shock and finding ways to pay for senior care

By Carrie Harpster

Whether you are doing early-stage research or are looking to quickly make a move, the cost of a senior living community will likely come as a bit of shock.


In most cases, you can expect monthly senior living costs to be significantly more than a mortgage, and for costs to increase in proportion to care needs.

According to Genworth’s 2020 Cost of Care Survey, the average monthly cost for assisted living in Ohio in 2021 is $4,350. Costs are higher in certain areas of the state and for the additional services needed for a resident requiring memory care.




$2.5M judgment against operator for resident’s ‘serious and painful’ injuries
results in changes to practices, contracts



A California assisted living and memory care provider has changed its resident assessment practices to be more “invasive” following a $2.5 million jury award a company representative called “outrageous.”


Moreno Valley, CA-based Integrated Care Communities was accused in a lawsuit of “extreme abuse and neglect and total lack of care” leading to “serious and painful” injuries for not following state regulations in reassessing the resident’s condition after a year of residency.

Phil Saucedo, board president for California Drug Consultants, doing business as Integrated Care Communities, told McKnight’s Senior Living that an abscess deep in the resident’s rectal cavity was “flat out missed” because that type of invasive check is beyond the scope and purview of a residential care facility’s license.









Top Tech Trends​
By Edward C. Baig


Breakthroughs in technology emerge out of the blue from time to time.

But what you will likely hear much more about in technology this year is an extension of products, services and developments that may already be on your radar, even if they’re something you’re not using yet or even fully understand. Here are some of the areas in technology that bear watching in 2022 — and in some cases well beyond.

1. Even more hype for the metaverse


The hype for the so-called “metaverse” is already out of control, even more so since October 2021, when Facebook the company — not the social network itself — changed its name to Meta, reflecting, among other things, its ownership of Oculus virtual reality (VR) headsets. The metaverse isn’t easy to define, and it’s even harder to spell out just how it will eventually serve older consumers.

It has elements of VR, where you’re completely immersed in another environment by wearing a headset, and elements of augmented reality (AR), which layers virtual objects over the physical world. These fields aren't completely new. But is it finally their time?









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NEXT NEW BLOG, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, January 12, 202

Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.co








I have always enjoyed my quiet time. Even as a kid, I preferred silence over noise. I found the sound of screaming toddlers and preteens grating. Oddly, now when I am at the age when I am supposed to prefer quiet over commotion, calm over clamor, I find it depressing.
 
While our little facility here in the hills of the Lower Hudson Valley has never been a place where one would go for excitement or to have a raucous time, there has always been a certain, almost comforting, level of activity. One could always find a group of residents seated around a table in our Country Kitchen or the lobby engaged in a card game, chess or those exchanges of mindless information older folks have been known to express. But now, a quiet, dare I say “pall” has settled over the place. The tables, once filled with residents playing dominoes or Rummy-cube are all but empty. A lone Styrofoam cup half-filled with coffee the only sign that a human being sat there. Even our group activities are poorly attended.



“Where is everybody?”, is the question on the lips of many of us who know what is supposed to be “normal” for this place. For us “old-timers” the silence is deafening and the absence of people discouraging.  
 
I say “discouraging” because the more people we have occupying the beds here, the better the quality of services is. More people means a greater variety of activities. At one time, we had book clubs, photography clubs and various “seminars” and lectures. Now, nothing. No one has much of an interest in anything except to complain about everything.
 
While the management is not forthcoming why the population has dwindled or why so many residents are absent, the consensus among us is that there are more people who have either tested positive for COVID or have been quarantined because they may have come in contact with an infected person.

The only positive thing is that the number of quarrels and disputes among residents is almost zero. Very unusual indeed. While I despise violence, I enjoy a good verbal assault now and then. Meanwhile, the place has the ambience of an undertaker’s waiting room, without the flowers, and the guest of honor…………………..
 




Omicron is just starting to hit U.S. regions
with unvaccinated senior citizens

By Peter Weber


The U.S. seven-day average of new COVID-19 cases topped 700,000 for the first time over the weekend, reflecting the spread of the highly infections Omicron variant, The Wall Street Journal reports, citing data from Johns Hopkins University.


 
Deaths, a lagging indicator, are rising slower, nearing an average of 1,600 a day, from closer to 1,250 a day early last week — though the new average may be artificially high from holiday-related reporting lags, the Journal says. "Public-health experts believe it will take more time to see how the rapid climb in Omicron cases will translate into deaths." Data from early Omicron hot spots suggests the U.S. may not fare as well as Britain and South Africa, where Omicron cases have already peaked.

In three of the U.S. cities with the earlier surges of COVID-19's Omicron variant — New York, Boston, and Chicago — "deaths have followed cases at a slightly reduced scale than in previous peaks," The New York Times reports. And "the number of COVID-19 patients who need intensive care or mechanical ventilation is approaching levels not seen since last winter."




Many seniors taking far more prescription drugs
than they actually need, study suggests



DUBLIN, Ireland — Do older adults really need to take a plethora of different medications to stay healthy? A new study finds many patients could and probably should throw out some of their prescriptions which no longer benefit their health.


Researchers from RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences found that medical interventions by a patient’s doctor can weed out old medications which may combine with other drugs to cause more harm than good. For many older adults, the number of prescription drugs they take seems to rise with their age. Previous studies show one in three older Americans take prescription medications which are inappropriate for their symptoms or could cause further harm.

Unfortunately, an increasing number of older people are also living with more than one medical condition, or multimorbidity. Healthcare providers often prescribe drugs which treat each of these ailments, leaving the patient or their caregivers to juggle all these prescriptions.




If You Notice This While Shopping,
Get Checked for Dementia
By Lauren Gray

As you age, you may notice that your memory and problem solving abilities aren't quite what they used to be. While many people dismiss these changes as a normal part of aging, experts warn that even subtle mild instances of cognitive impairment or memory loss can be a possible sign of dementia. They say that you should always discuss these changes with your general practitioner, who can help you assess your symptoms. In particular, experts warn that there's one early sign of dementia you may notice while shopping—and if it happens to you, it may be time for a dementia screening. Read on to find out which red flag to look out for, and how to protect yourself from the serious consequences that could occur because of it.


In the early stages of dementia, cognitive symptoms can be particularly subtle, making them easy to dismiss. Yet experts from the U.K.'s National Health Services (NHS) say that if you notice increased difficulty with handling money while shopping, you should never ignore it. They say that many dementia patients may get confused while trying to calculate the correct change when shopping, or may have difficulty determining an appropriate tip in a restaurant. They add that this increased difficulty with numbers and money is especially prevalent in those with Alzheimer's disease.




Omicron May Already Be Peaking in East Coast States
By Zachary Mack

Certain areas may already be about to move past the latest variant.


In the roughly six weeks since its discovery, the highly contagious Omicron variant has surpassed the previously dominant Delta in the U.S. The result has been an unprecedented surge in COVID-19 cases past the heights seen last winter, with the national daily average spiking by 215 percent over the past two weeks to 677,243, as of Jan. 9, according to data from The New York Times. But almost as quickly as the variant's post-holiday surge began, at least one top expert is now predicting that Omicron may already be peaking in certain states and could start dropping soon. Read on to see which places may be about to move past the latest viral wave.


During a Jan. 9 appearance on CBS's Face the Nation, Scott Gottlieb, MD, former commissioner of the Food & Drug Administration, discussed how surprised he was to have seen the latest viral offshoot spread so quickly and defy predictions that Delta would be the "last major wave" of COVID-19. But he predicted that states and major cities along the Eastern Seaboard might already have reached the highest caseloads of infections from Omicron and could soon see numbers drop.




‘I think they did it on purpose’:
My dad and stepmother caught COVID-19 from her family

By Quentin Fottrell

My father married a wonderful lady about three years ago; both were widowed and in their 70s and 80s. The woman was well off — not rich, but having several rental properties, investments and cash on hand. My father was comfortable and had no financial concerns, and was able to afford vacations and other things to enhance retirement.


The woman had one child, a daughter who was adopted as a small child. The daughter made it clear she did not approve of the marriage and considered my father a golddigger.

Fast forward two years, well into the COVID-19 pandemic. My father and his wife sent a message to all family members stating they were going to spend the holidays alone in their home, and did not want visitors due to COVID-19 concerns.






ElderGrow helps senior living communities create
indoor gardens for cooking, craft projects

By GAYLE JOHNSON

Betty Rutt never lets freezing temperatures, lashing rain or broiling sun interfere with her love for gardening. The 93-year-old tends to sage, saffron and other fragrant herbs in any weather in the warmth of an indoor wheeled garden housed at Brethren Village, a Lititz retirement community.


“It gets me out of my room,” says Rutt, who recalls starting a garden on her husband’s farm in Donegal Township as a newlywed years ago. This mobile collection of African Blue basil, rosemary, Bronze fennel, lavender and other aromatic plants usually stays in the first-floor lounge at the retirement community’s personal care building, which houses about 80 residents.

At Legend of Lancaster in Manor Township, another senior-living community, Jackie Gribble grows her own coleus, a colorful herb, from cuttings from that community’s mobile garden. This way, Gribble, 82, can garden in her room in the center’s memory care building as well as with some of the other 30 residents at the 6-by-4-foot gardening cart.










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NEXT NEW BLOG, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, January 11, 2022

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Beyond Britney: Abuse, Exploitation, And Death
Inside America’s Guardianship Industry
By Heidi Blake

They can isolate you: A teenager with cerebral palsy was snatched from the school gates and hidden from his parents.

They can bleed you dry: A successful rheumatologist was declared incapacitated after a bout of depression and lost her million-dollar waterfront home.



And they can leave you to die: A 46-year-old man died under a do-not-resuscitate order that went against the desperate pleas of his wife.

All three nightmares share a common cause: These people had been placed under the care — and control — of legal guardians. America’s guardianship system was designed as a last resort to be used only in the rare and drastic event that someone is totally incapacitated by mental or physical disability. In those cases, conscientious guardians can provide vital support, often in complex and distressing circumstances. But an investigation by BuzzFeed News has found that the system has grown into a vast, lucrative, and poorly regulated industry that has subsumed more than a million people, many of whom insist they are capable of making their own decisions, and placed them at risk of abuse, theft, and even death.



Retire to a college campus? Senior communities see benefits
to intergenerational living

By Sarah Matusek

Ruth Jones lives on top of the world – her world, anyway.

From nine stories high, she can gaze down at a sun-smothered, urban Arizona sprawl featuring a school she began serving in 1981 – the top of an auditorium here, her last faculty office there.


The former political science professor is so fond of Arizona State University that she retired on campus.

How do you break down stereotypes across generations? If this senior living residence on a university campus is any indication, proximity may be key.




Senior living occupancy increases for second quarter in a row;
Delta variant has little effect



Senior living (independent living and assisted living combined) occupancy increased for the second consecutive quarter, rising to 81% in the fourth quarter of 2021, according to NIC MAP data released Thursday afternoon.


Occupancy increased 1 percentage point from the third quarter and 2.3 percentage points from a pandemic low of 78.7% in the second quarter. National Investment Center for Seniors Housing & Care Chief Economist Beth Burnham Mace said that although fourth-quarter occupancy typically is negatively affected by seasonal flu, the data do not appear to show any significant effect on occupancy from the COVID-19 delta variant. The impact from the omicron variant may not be known until first-quarter 2022 data are available.

Assisted living saw the largest increase in occupancy compared with independent living and skilled nursing properties, rising 1.4 percentage points in the fourth quarter. Assisted living occupancy increased to 78.3%, up from a pandemic low of 75.4% in the first quarter of 2021 but still below its pre-pandemic level of 84.9%.




How to Help a Loved One Deal With Mobility Problems
By Tanya Bricking Leach

Falls are by far the leading cause of injury among older adults, leading to 3.1 million emergency room visits and more than 34,000 deaths among Americans ages 65 and older in 2019, the most recent data available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


“I use the phrase, ‘Fall is a four-letter word,’ ” says Lisa Caruso, a geriatrician at Boston Medical Center who also holds a master’s degree in public health. “Falls are definitely something we ask about and want to prevent.”

That’s because mobility is key to independent living.

When people begin to lose their balance or fall frequently, not only is injury possible, but they’re often no longer able to do the daily activities that used to come easily.












How You Can Realistically Save Quickly
By Ella Woodward

It can sometimes be helpful to have a little extra in the bank. Whether you are trying to save up for something nice like a holiday, or you just want a bit put aside for a rainy day, it is always a good idea to have a little extra cash flow. However, if you want to save up quickly, you need to make sure that you are doing so realistically. Here are some of our top tips to help you build up your savings as quickly as possible.
Set a Realistic Goal


The first thing you need to do is ensure that you have a target goal in mind. It is not enough for you to simply say “I will save money each month”. There is no structure or discipline there, and it could mean that you could end up skipping when you should be saving. Before you know it, you only have $100 put away in your bank account, when you ideally should have a lot more.



Therefore, you need to set a target for how much you are going to save each month without being unrealistic. For example, you might decide that you want to save $1000 a month. Depending on your income, this might be a very achievable goal, and it will be easier than you think to do so when you know what you are doing.











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NEXT NEW BLOG, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Monday, January 10, 2022




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I’m not one for conspiracies or spreading rumors, but I’m going to go out on a limb and say “SOMETHING FUNNY IS GOING ON HERE.” And by “here” I mean the assisted living facility where I, and 150 plus other seniors live. And by “going on” I mean the very real feeling by me and many of us, that there is a bug going around here that is causing people to become ill and it’s not COVID. Or so we have been told. And one does not have to be a detective to notice that the population of this facility (once bursting at the seams) has dropped dramatically. Although I am not privy to the actual census, a quick look around will confirm what I am saying.
 
Our lobby, usually busy with residents waiting for the dining room to open for meals, is only half full. Where once hardly a seat could be found, there are now many places to sit. And once in the dining room itself, only a fraction of what once was lively, noisy and well attended, is now a sea of empty seats and residents seated by themselves, leaving the rest to wonder where everyone is.



Adding to the mystery are the number of meals being served to residents in their rooms. There is so much traffic in the halls caused by staffers rolling food carts back and forth that one has to be careful not to bump into one. Why? Who are these residents who are too incapacitated to come to the dining room? We are told we have zero cases of COVID in the facility, which leaves us to wonder just what is causing people to become ill? And just to add a little fuel to the fire, residents whose rooms face the front of the building and can observe the traffic arriving and leaving have reported seeing an increase in the number of ambulances at our door. At the very least, it makes one pause.

In the past, this facility has been the victim of several mass illnesses including norovirus and COVID-19, both putting us into a lockdown protocol. But this is different. We are not being quarantined, nor have we been told to suggest there is something afoot.. They continue to tell us to wear our masks at all times and to wash our hands, but otherwise no special precautions. And no word from management, which is odd. Because if there was something going on that would affect the health of a group of residents, we would be informed quickly and in no uncertain terms.
 
Now, let me add something personnel. Saturday morning I awoke feeling fine. I took my shower and dressed as always. However, after a few minutes, I felt dizzy. A wave of nausea swept over me.
 
I got up from my seat in front of the laptop and could barely stand. I felt wobbly and my vision blurred. I contemplated skipping breakfast but decided that perhaps if I ate something, I would feel better. I “staggered” to the dining room, where I ate some oatmeal and scrambled eggs. I was feeling better, but suddenly became exhausted. Upon arriving back at my room, I lay down and promptly fell asleep (or passed out, it’s hard to tell) and ” came to” four hours later, missing lunch. Feeling better, I went to dinner that evening. Was I a victim of whatever was happening here? I sure would like to know. But will they tell us? Not likely. Just as it’s not likely they are unaware of the situation. Perhaps we’ll know more today, Monday. If we do, I’ll let you know. …….
 
 




Older Americans Can Expect Higher Drug Prices in 2022


Older adults will likely shell out more for healthcare costs in 2022. Medicare beneficiaries will see their premiums for 'Part B,' which covers doctor and urgent-care visits, increase by more than 14%, on top of increasing prescription drug prices.


Richard Frank, senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, explained a provision outlined in President Joe Biden's Build Back Better Act would penalize companies for raising their prices faster than overall economic growth.

It is a change he believes would help rein in companies' price hikes and save people money.



Why cloth masks might not be enough
as Omicron spreads

By Clare Ansberry

Doctors and healthcare systems say it might be time to change your face masks.



With infections surging due to the fast-spreading Omicron variant, including among the vaccinated, physicians are now urging people to ditch cloth face masks, which they say may not provide enough protection against the virus. Instead, they recommend pairing cloth masks with surgical models or moving on to stronger respirator masks.

The Mayo Clinic began on Thursday requiring all patients and visitors to wear surgical masks or N95 or KN95 masks. Anyone wearing a single-layer, homemade cloth mask, gaiter or bandanna, or a mask with a vent, will be provided a medical-grade mask to wear over it.




Express Yourself:
All about the Older Americans Act
By Wally Pearce

On July 14, 1965 — 57 years ago — when the Older Americans Act (OAA) became law, it also established the Administration on Aging (AoA) within the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, calling for the creation of State Units on Aging. In response to a concern for a lack of social-service-systems for older persons, Congress acted to improve the status of older adults by founding the OAA. Additionally, on July 30, 1965, Congress also enacted Medicare.


Today, OAA funds critical support for senior citizen’s safety, health, and independent. Community-based services like Meals on Wheels, healthcare promotion and counseling, caregiver support, legal services, transportation, elder abuse prevention, Ombudsman program, in-home supportive services and much more.

AoA is also part of the Administration for Community Living (ACL) within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). ACL created the fundamental principle that older adults and people with disabilities should be able to live where they choose, and to participate fully in their communities with dignity.




The Best Pets to Get for Lonely Older Adults


Everyone gets lonely, which is why animals make great companions. This is especially true for older adults with grown-up children living elsewhere or those living in a retirement or assisted-living facility. Whether it's for yourself or someone else, here are some of the best pets to get for lonely older adults.
Cats


Cats are a great animal choice for any lonely senior or older adult. They're cute, cuddly, and relatively low maintenance. You don't need to take them for walks or pick up their poop. All you need to buy are a litter box and cat litter, and they'll figure out the rest on their own. You can also buy wet or dry cat food depending on your kitty's preferences. Short-haired cats won't shed as much as long-haired cats, so keep that in mind when adopting a feline friend. Cats are one type of pet with many benefits for seniors. Since they're always around, they help curb loneliness and isolation for those living alone.




Northwestern to launch new institute to study aging
By Lisa Schencker

Your biological age may be different from your real age. A new institute at Northwestern plans to explore the issue.



Some people look and act younger than they are. Others seem to age prematurely, acquiring wrinkles, gray hair and an assortment of health problems earlier than their peers.


Now, a new institute at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine will aim to find out why, and whether there’s a way to slow or reverse the aging process and the toll it can take on people’s health. The Potocsnak Longevity Institute, which is launching this month, will focus on research related to aging, and on treating patients suffering from its effects.





Helping a Loved One
Live Independently at Home​ ​
By Amy Goyer


According to AARP’s "Home and Community Preferences" survey, 3 out of 4 adults age 50 or older say they want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. And many do: Nearly 9 in 10 care recipients live in their own home, in someone else’s home or in their caregiver’s home. Some homes are well-suited for aging and providing care, but many require modifications.



When my parents needed 24-hour care and moved in with me, we didn't have the budget to build an addition or completely revamp the house. But with some research and advice, I found easier, affordable ways to make the home safe and navigable. And I continued to adapt as their needs changed. Eventually, I was able to fully remodel a bathroom for Dad’s safety, as well as get entry threshold ramps.


The goal is to help loved ones be as independent as possible at home, for as long as possible. To tailor your or your loved ones’ residence for care at home, you can start with a home assessment by an occupational therapist, physical therapist, geriatric care manager (aging life care specialist), certified aging-in-place specialist (CAPS) or qualified professional via the area agency on aging or Department of Veterans Affairs.









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Good Day. It’s Sunday, January 9, 2022


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I know it’s the day after the one-year anniversary of the attempt by anti-democratic elements to take over the duly elected government of the United States of America by insurrection which included storming the U.S. Capitol building and threatening the lives of our lawmakers including the Vice President. However, it was necessary for me to wait because I wanted to hear what the current President had to say about the events of that day. And boy, did he say it and say it big. Calling out the former president no less than 16 times, blaming him directly for the riot and the subsequent threat to our democracy. And as he spoke, I thought of how different it could have been and how stupid Trump is for taking the path he took.

It all could have been so much better. Not only for the nation, but for Donald Trump too. Yes, you heard me. I’m saying things could have gone in favor of the former president and actually put him in a much better position for a 2024 bid. If only his ego hadn’t got in the way. Just think about it.



Let us make believe Trump, after some grumbling and bitching, conceded the election and vowed to continue to work to make America great again. He would not even have had to support Biden. All he had to do was to keep his mouth shut. There would have been no insurrection, no “Trump do or die” attitude by a majority of Republican legislators. They still could have supported Trump and not have to make themselves the fools they have become by perpetuating the big lie that the election was stolen. And as for Trump himself, he would have come off looking more presidential than he had for four years while still commanding the support of nearly 170 million people that voted for him. And, instead of looking like the insane egotist he is, he would have been in a great position to run again, and maybe even win…fairly. Now, even if he runs and garners enough electoral votes to make him president, the results will be sullied because of the very thing he promoted back in 2020. The idiot screwed himself.


While the president’s remarks may not have been on a par with FDR’s “Day of Infamy” December 7th, 1941 speech, it was just as dramatic. In a way it was a declaration of war against the forces of evil that want to divide the nation in order to restore a way of life that wasn’t that great to begin with. America, and the world, is not the same as it was 70 years ago, and those who refuse to recognize that are out of step with reality. ……………………..
 



SATURDAY JANUARY 9, 2022



Many U.S. Adults Report Pandemic-Related Sleep Disturbances

More than half of U.S. adults say they have experienced an increase in sleep disturbances since the beginning of the pandemic, according to survey results published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.


The online survey of 2,006 U.S. adults was commissioned by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and was conducted between March 11 and 15, 2021.

The survey revealed that overall, 56 percent of respondents have experienced "COVID-somnia" sleep disturbances; this number was slightly higher among men than women (59 versus 54 percent) and among younger people (Gen Z, 59 percent; Millennials, 64 percent; Gen X, 59 percent) versus older adults (Baby Boomers, 41 percent; adults 75 years and older, 25 percent). Top reported sleep disturbances included trouble falling or staying asleep (57 percent), fewer hours of sleep (46 percent), worse sleep quality (45 percent), and an increase in disturbing dreams (36 percent).




What to Do When You Receive a Surprise Medical Bill
By Rachel Nania


There’s one less thing privately insured Americans need to worry about if they experience a medical emergency in 2022: getting an unexpected bill from a health care provider who was involved in their treatment but was out of their insurance plan’s network — a practice that happens in about 1 in 5 emergency room visits, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF).


These so-called surprise medical bills — which often arise when patients have little or no say in where they receive care or who gives it — are illegal starting Jan. 1, 2022, under a new law called the No Surprises Act. The law is expected to save millions of Americans with individual or employer-sponsored health plans hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in unforeseen medical expenses in certain situations, while helping to drive down insurance premiums overall.
What are the new protections against surprise billing?




4 of the Biggest Changes for Medicare in 2022​
By Dena Bunis

The biggest change Medicare's nearly 64 million beneficiaries will see in the new year is higher premiums and deductibles for the medical care they'll receive under the federal government's health care insurance program for individuals age 65 and older and people with disabilities.


Medicare's benefits will remain largely the same in 2022. As the new year begins, Congress is still debating several proposals that would change the face of Medicare, including adding a hearing benefit and several proposals to lower the price of prescription drugs, including capping out-of-pocket costs in Part D plans. But even if Congress adopts these changes, they wouldn't take effect this year.
Largest Part B increase ever

The monthly premium for Part B, which covers doctor visits and other outpatient services, such as diagnostic screenings and lab tests, will be $170.10 in 2022, up $21.60 from the 2021 monthly charge. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) officials say this largest-ever dollar increase was necessary because of three factors:



World's oldest person turns 119
and hopes to reach her 120th birthday

By Cortney Moore

The world’s oldest person recently celebrated her 119th birthday in a nursing home in Japan.


Kane Tanaka – a Guinness World Records recognized supercentenarian was born on Jan. 2, 1903, in the Fukuoka Prefecture of Japan, reports Kyodo News.


The national nonprofit news outlet said Tanaka spent her birthday at an assisted living facility in Higashi Ward, Fukuoka. Tanaka reportedly plays number puzzle games to keep her mind sharp and interacts with facility staff through gestures. According to Kyodo, Tanaka is still a fan of chocolate and fizzy drinks.






100 ways to slightly improve your life without really trying


1 Exercise on a Monday night (nothing fun happens on a Monday night).

2 On the fence about a purchase? Wait 72 hours before you buy it.



3 Tip: the quickest supermarket queue is always behind the fullest trolley (greeting, paying and packing take longer than you think).

4 Bring fruit to work. Bring fruit to bed!

5 Consider going down to four days a week. It’s likely a disproportionate amount of your fifth day’s work is taxed anyway, so you’ll lose way less than a fifth of your take-home pay.







The Perils of Downsizing
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/the-perils-of-downsizing/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=e2e0d0e74e-Tuesday_Newsletter_12_14_21_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-e2e0d0e74e-165407981&mc_cid=e2e0d0e74e&mc_eid=94767a79b9
==================================================================
Sex and Our Aging Bodies
Read more  >>  https://www.ncoa.org/article/sex-after-50-how-our-changing-body-affects-our-sexual-health?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CHA
==================================================================
Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Are Coming:
What You Need to Know

By Kathleen Cameron
Read more  >>  https://www.ncoa.org/article/over-the-counter-hearing-aids-are-coming-what-older-adults-need-to-know?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CHA
==================================================================
5 Foods to Say No to After 50
By Alison Gwinn
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2021/foods-to-avoid-after-50.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-122921-P1-6037516&ET_CID=6037516&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
==================================================================
Betty White wasn't afraid of death. Here's why
By Hope Campbell
Read more  >>  https://www.thelist.com/722109/betty-white-wasnt-afraid-of-death-heres-why/
==================================================================
Older adults aren't getting their hearing
checked enough --especially women
Read more  >>  https://www.studyfinds.org/hearing-loss-tests-older-adults/
==================================================================
Should I Get that CT Scan?
By Janice M. Horowitz
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/should-i-get-that-ct-scan-or-x-ray/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=e2e0d0e74e-Tuesday_Newsletter_12_14_21_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-e2e0d0e74e-165407981&mc_cid=e2e0d0e74e&mc_eid=94767a79b9
==================================================================
Older women benefit just as much from
resistance training as older men, study finds

By Kristen Dalli
Read more  >>  https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/older-women-benefit-just-as-much-from-resistance-training-as-older-men-study-finds-010721.html
==================================================================
Even After Covid, Could Congress Ignore
The Long-Term Care Needs Of Older Adults?

By Howard Gleckman
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2022/01/03/even-after-covid-could-congress-ignore-the-long-term-care-needs-of-older-adults/?sh=3564af4a23be
==================================================================
IRS Raises Limit For ABLE Accounts
Read more  >>  https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2022/01/03/irs-raises-limit-for-able-accounts/29640/
==================================================================
Andrew Cuomo Won't Faces Charges for
Order That Killed 15,000 Nursing Home Residents

Read more  >>  https://www.lifenews.com/2022/01/03/andrew-cuomo-wont-faces-charges-for-signing-death-warrant-for-15000-nursing-home-residents/
==================================================================
Why You Must Put Digital Assets in Your Will or Estate Plan
By Marc Saltzman and Edward C. Baig
==================================================================
When the eye on older patients is a camera
By Sofie Kodner
Read more  >>  https://www.ocregister.com/2022/01/03/senior-living-when-the-eye-on-older-patients-is-a-camera/
==================================================================
Signs You May Have Suffered Age Discrimination
By Tamara Lytle
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/work/working-at-50-plus/info-2019/age-discrimination-signs.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-WORKJOBS--CTRL-010322-P7-6048198&ET_CID=6048198&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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Spouses of individuals with dementia
may have increased risk for cognitive disorders

Read more  >>  https://www.healio.com/news/neurology/20211227/spouses-of-individuals-with-dementia-may-have-increased-risk-for-cognitive-disorders
==================================================================
Why Older Workers Are Switching Jobs Now
By Gwen Moran
==================================================================
3 Easy Tricks to Read and Assimilate Text Faster for Seniors
By Nick van Migrot
Read more  >>  https://seniornews.com/3-easy-tricks-to-read-and-assimilate-text-faster-for-seniors/









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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022





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Good Day. It’s Thursday, January 6, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com















Signs You May Have Suffered Age Discrimination
By Tamara Lytle

1. Coded comments.

When company leaders say younger workers are “fresh faces” and “new blood,” while older employees are “set in their ways,” it can be an indication of a discriminatory mind-set, says Kellee Boulais Kruse, who represents workers as a principal at the Employment Law Group (TELG) in Washington, D.C.



In fact, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently warned employers that the use of terms such as “energetic,” “young,” and “recent graduate” could be considered signs of systemic age discrimination.

2. Different dealings.

Are younger workers getting all the opportunities for training, promotions and juicy projects? If older workers are raising their hands but always being passed over, it could be a sign of ageism. The same goes for buyouts that are offered only to older workers.




Spouses of individuals with dementia
may have increased risk for cognitive disorders


Identifying and addressing risk factors for cognitive disorders shared within couples may reduce the risk for these disorders in the spouses of those with dementia, according to results of a prospective cohort study in JAMA Network Open.



“Spouses generally share a common environment, and many studies have investigated spousal concordances for factors such as lifestyle and physical and psychological health,” Hee Won Yang, MD, of the department of neuropsychiatry at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital in South Korea, and colleagues wrote. “These factors, which are concordant within couples, are known to be associated with a risk of dementia or cognitive decline and are also negatively associated with spousal cognitive disorders. Therefore, these factors may mediate cognitive disorders and changes in cognitive functions that correlate within couples. In addition, because most of these factors are modifiable and can contribute to a reduction in the risk of dementia, early detection and correction within couples is important in preventing dementia.”




Why Older Workers Are Switching Jobs Now
By Gwen Moran


Monica Parker needed a change. She turned 50 during the pandemic and had a comfortable job on the leadership team of a nonprofit. It wasn’t that she didn’t like the job, but there was a nagging feeling that it was time for something different. And, in the labor market of the early 2020s, there is plenty of opportunity for workers to pick and choose what they want to do. ​​“I'm a lawyer by trade, but more recently worked for an education nonprofit as its associate executive director. After turning 50, I decided to move into the diversity and inclusion space,” she recalls.


Parker calls herself “something of a career change expert” and has reinvented her career before. And she’s not the only one who feels the need for something new. A 2021 Bankrate study found that 55 percent of adults are looking to change jobs within the next 12 months, and a recent survey from Resume Builder found that 40 percent of workers age 54 and older have considered switching jobs because of the new opportunities available. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that roughly 4.2 million people voluntarily left their jobs in October, a decline from the previous month but still continuing a string of exceptionally high quit rates that have been dubbed “the Great Resignation.”

Fewer workers, more opportunity



3 Easy Tricks to Read and Assimilate Text Faster for Seniors
By Nick van Migrot

It’s highly likely that you don’t remember how you learned to read as a child. However, the way you learned how to read as a child has little relevance to how we should learn how to read as seniors. While the slow process full of methods may work for young people who are trying to understand the basics of words and structure of different sentences, adults who need lots of information to process in a couple of seconds need an entirely different reading method.



Learning how to read and assimilate text is one of the best skills that you should develop today. This skill will save you lots of research and study time. While there are lots of amazing ways to develop this important skill, here are three simple and effective ways. But first, let’s define reading comprehension.
Reading comprehension

Reading comprehension is all about understanding what you are reading. Strong reading comprehension involves a wide range of literacy skills needed to identify and interpret meanings in a text. Several elements are involved in effective reading comprehension. And they include:







19 underrated part-time jobs that pay well and...
How to get them

    Part-time jobs have become a popular to bring in extra cash with a low commitment.

    Accountants, physician assistants, and programmers are among the highest paid part-time roles.

    Writing, tutoring, fitness instructing, and graphic designing are also in-demand options.

In recent years, it has felt outdated to think about a career in terms of working long hours for many years in a single job and climbing the career ladder in the same profession you chose as a teenager or 20-something. In particular, the COVID-19 pandemic really exploded stereotypes around how and when we do our work.


Part-time jobs have expanded since the pandemic hit, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of people employed part-time for economic reasons (because employers downgraded full-time jobs, laid people off, or otherwise had to alter their workforce) more than doubled from 4.4 million in February 2020 to 10.9 million in April 2020. And even a year into the global health crisis that number remained higher than it was pre-pandemic. As of September 2021, over 20 million people were working part-time for non-economic reasons such as balancing school or family — an increase of more than 1.3 million year over year.






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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, JANUARY 7. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, January 5, 2022

Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com





At The A.L.F…..
No Covid. Just The Winter Blues

It is so quiet here at the Asylum, you can hear resident’s artificial hips clicking away.
 
Thankfully, the silence is due, not because we have a COVID outbreak, but because the cold, dark winter has set in.
 
After an unusual run of unseasonably mild temperatures, waking up this Tuesday morning to 19 degree temperatures was a shock. Fortunately, the snowstorm that hit the east coast the other day completely missed us.
 
Adding to the silence is a general feeling of malaise. Nobody feels like doing much of anything. Including eating. The dining room, usually the liveliest place in the facility, was half full this morning. Nobody wanted to get out of their nice, warm beds. I often think I’m the only one here that gets up early. I’ve stuck to the same routine I’ve followed since I was a teenager. It’s a hard habit to break. The only difference, now I don’t have to stand on a cold subway platform at 6am waiting for the “F” train to take me to work. Ah! Small pleasures………………..






Even After Covid, Could Congress Ignore
The Long-Term Care Needs Of Older Adults?

By Howard Gleckman

Is it possible that Congress will do nothing to improve long-term services and supports for older adults and younger people with disabilities, or assist their families? Even after 603,000 people over age 65 were killed by Covid-19 in the past two years. Yes, it is possible.


The House version of President Biden’s Build Back Better plan included many provisions aimed at improving both long-term care and healthcare for older adults. But Biden and his party’s congressional leadership are facing unwavering opposition from all Senate Republicans and key resistance from at least two Senate Democrats. To boost support among those Democrats, they now are looking to scale back the House bill.

Brutal triage

Instead of providing temporary increases in federal funding for dozens of programs, lawmakers now appear to be focused on permanently expanding just a handful. But that inevitably will mean dropping many other proposals, possibly including some that benefits older adults, other people with disabilities, and their families.




IRS Raises Limit For ABLE Accounts

The Internal Revenue Service has increased the gift tax exclusion due to inflation. The annual contribution limit for ABLE accounts is tied to that figure.


For the first time in four years, the amount of money that people with disabilities can save without jeopardizing eligibility for government benefits is rising.

Starting this month, the Internal Revenue Service said that the federal gift tax exclusion is growing from $15,000 to $16,000 annually. That same cap also applies to contributions to ABLE accounts, a special savings vehicle for people with disabilities.




Andrew Cuomo Won't Faces Charges for
Order That Killed 15,000 Nursing Home Residents


Disgraced former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo will not face any state charges associated with his executive order that resulted in the deaths of as many as 15,000 nursing home residents. His order placed COVID positive patients in the nursing homes even though alternative locations were available, a move that quickly led to their deaths.


According to news reports, new Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg will not bring charges in the case.

Cuomo’s lawyer, Elkan Abramowitz, applauded the decision.







Why You Must Put Digital Assets in Your Will or Estate Plan
By Marc Saltzman and Edward C. Baig


You may not realize it, but you're creating a significant digital footprint as you send email, comment on social media, post a photo gallery and view your medical records electronically — and that's even if you don't have a blog, podcast or website.


But what happens to all these assets after you die? Creating a digital estate plan is becoming increasingly important, whether it's handled through your will or your estate's lawyers, services that specialize in assigning digital beneficiaries, or a complete list of your online accounts and their passwords given to a trusted family member or friend.


Don't leave loved ones scrambling later. Thinking about this now for yourself or an aging family member will help survivors properly notify and close down accounts posthumously.




When the eye on older patients is a camera
By Sofie Kodner,

In the middle of a rainy Michigan night, 88-year-old Dian Wurdock walked out the front door of her son’s home in Grand Rapids, barefoot and coatless. Her destination was unknown even to herself.



Wurdock was several years into a dementia diagnosis that turned out to be Alzheimer’s disease. By luck, her son woke up and found her before she stepped too far down the street. As the Alzheimer’s progressed, so did her wandering and with it, her children’s anxiety.

“I was losing it,” said her daughter, Deb Weathers-Jablonski. “I needed to keep her safe, especially at night.”







Don’t Have Much of a 401k or IRA?
How Senior Citizens Build A Retirement Fund
On A Fixed Income

By Georgina Tzanetos

The question of how to squeeze extra money out of a fixed income budget has long perplexed both advisors and their retiree clients. The answer is of course not simple, but most people fall into one of two categories — those who can draw on retirement accounts and those who cannot.



A whopping 40% of Americans rely solely on Social Security for their income after the age of 65. How? Well, luckily for this group social security will likely be funded for the remainder of the time they will require it. Additionally, Medicare also covers the majority of healthcare costs.


But what if a Medicare supplement is needed? An unexpected health cost? A repair needed on an older home? The reality is, there is always something that extra cash will be needed for. For this group of retirees, the goal of building an emergency fund will be a little more challenging. Here are some ideas for those with a home and those without to boost their savings.












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NEXT NEW BLOG, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, January 4, 2022
Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com










The fastest, and easiest, way to get information out to our residents here at the A.L.F. is to do it while we are dining. That’s what our on-duty supervisor did this past Sunday morning.
 
In a surprisingly loud voice, the young women in charge when the other supervisors are off asked for our attention. She was repeating the announcement she made an hour earlier during the first-seating breakfast.
 
“To dispel any rumors”, she shouted, there are no cases of the COVID virus anywhere in the facility. “The quarantine signs you see on some residents’ doors,” she continued, “are there as a precaution. These are residents who have stayed overnight at a friend or relative and are waiting to be tested.”


For myself, and the people sitting with me, this is good (and necessary) news. Innuendos, falsehoods, misinformation and rumors spread faster than a Fox News report around here. At least we now know where we stand during this latest outbreak. And it’s not just good fortune that has put us in this favorable state. The lack of infection here is due in total to the amazing way the DOH protocols regarding long-term care facilities have been adhered to by the management of this facility. However, this does nothing to lower our vulnerability. Despite all of our staff and residents being vaccinated and boosted, we are still the main targets of the virus. And that is why our staff has to constantly remind some of our residents to put on their masks while in common areas and to wear the masks correctly. Under the nose or on your chin or dangling from one ear does no good.

Sadly, the big question remains unanswered. When will this all be over? How much longer until we can throw away the masks, the tests, the PPE and get on with our lives? Or will this be the way we will live out our days?…….





Betty White wasn't afraid of death. Here's why
By Hope Campbell
   
Television comedy legend and beloved cultural icon Betty White died on December 31, 2021, just weeks before her 100th birthday on January 17, 2022. The actor's agent, Jeff Witjas, told People that White "died peacefully in her sleep" and if the words in her interview more than a decade prior still rang true for White, she was not afraid of what was to come.


White was born on January 17, 1922, in Oak Park, Illinois to Horace and Tess White. The only child was only 2 years old when she moved with her parents to Los Angeles, the perfect place to grow up if you are going to one day pursue a career in show business. And White's career in film and television spanned eight decades, according to Biography. News of her death devastated the world as 2021 drew to a close, as America and White were getting ready to celebrate her milestone birthday. It was White's mother, Tess, who gave her daughter a foundation that allowed her not to fear death, however, as White revealed in 2011.




Older adults aren't getting their hearing checked enough --
especially women


The majority of people in America aged 50 and up have not been checked for hearing loss anytime in the past two years, according to a recent poll. Nearly 80% report having primary care physicians who have not questioned or checked their hearing capabilities.


Hearing loss can hinder a person from socially connecting with others including family and friends. Additionally, the sense of hearing often diminishes with age and can increase the risk of falls for elderly people. Studies have also found that hearing loss can double the risk of dementia.

Results from the National Poll on Healthy Aging, based at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, indicate that those aged 65 to 80 are more likely to be tested for hearing loss in the past two years. Also, results show that men are more likely to be screened than women. Still, nearly 72% of men over the age of 65 report not having been tested.




Should I Get that CT Scan?
By Janice M. Horowitz

The author of 'Health Your Self' explains why she avoids CT scans and its potentially damaging X-rays

Barely anyone goes to the doctor and begs for a CT scan. But neither do most people beg not to have one. I, however, do. My family is riddled with cancer, with practically everyone having had one form or another, especially as they get older. The link between radiation from a CT scan and cancer is undoubtedly controversial, but for me, it's always been a natural leap. Avoiding them, unless absolutely necessary, is my mantra.


Never was my anti-X-ray posture more apparent than when my family was in a car accident one summer night a couple of years ago. We had swerved from a deer, sped off-road and, like some monster-car roller coaster, bounced up and down grassy hills as high as six feet tall. When the car finally crashed to a halt, the impact of the airbag broke my sternum. But it was my daughter who suffered a worse fate. She had compression fractures in seven vertebrae, including one in her neck.






Older women benefit just as much from
resistance training as older men, study finds

By Kristen Dalli

A great deal of research points to the benefits associated with staying active into older age, as exercise has been linked with benefits for both physical and mental health for older consumers.


Now, a new study conducted by researchers from the University of New South Wales explored how older men and women fare when they practice resistance training. According to their findings, the benefits of resistance training -- including increasing upper body strength and muscle mass -- aren’t exclusive to men.

“Historically, people tended to believe that men adapted to a greater degree from resistance training compared to women,” said researcher Dr. Amanda Hagstrom. “The differences we found primarily relate to how we look at the data -- that is absolutely, or relatively. ‘Absolute’ looks at the overall gains, while ‘relative’ is a percentage based on their body size.”





Opinion: I want to tell millennials who are scared of ageing
that it's really not that bad

By Janet Street-Porter


In Japan, some men and women of a certain age who excel in the traditional arts and crafts are designated “living national treasures”, an honour which acknowledges their unique contribution to society.



Designating senior citizens “living national treasures” is definitely an idea that should be adopted here. The biggest problem facing society is how to sell getting old in a positive way, especially to the young who view it with unmitigated dread. Ageing is inevitable, no matter what new technology or expensive face creams you might invest in. It need not be downhill all the way, though.

Too often, we talk about the elderly in terms of less. Less of everything that makes life enjoyable. Less good health and mobility, fewer friends, less money, less memory, less time left on earth. Without spelling it out, we are endorsing a shrinking existence, not a vibrant life. The word “old” carries so much baggage. Negative thinking about the third of the population who are not young is steeped in our national consciousness. It can be as bad as racism or sexism, as we routinely resort to lazy stereotypes.









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NEXT NEW BLOG, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Monday, January 3, 2022
Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com








I had all intentions of going to our New Year’s Eve party here at the Asylum on Friday. After all, as a member of the Resident’s Council, I felt it was my duty to at least make an appearance. However, my body, caring little about protocol, decided otherwise. As party time approached (7:30) I found myself firmly ensconced on my recliner, unable to move. I was just too pooped to party.
 
Contrary to what you may have heard, or believed, I am not very much of a party person. Oh yes, in my youth I had stayed out until the wee hours of the morn (sometimes beyond one am) but as of late, my desire to “trip the light fantastic” has waned. Perhaps it is having no access to adult beverages. We are a “No Alcohol Allowed” facility. The last thing I had that contained alcohol was a swig of Scope mouthwash I swallowed accidentally. Not much of a “kick”, but my breath smelled minty sweet for weeks.

Not only did I miss our party, I missed the obligatory countdown to midnight as well.
 
Normally, I would have turned to one of the local TV stations to watch the ball drop in Times Square. I would follow that by wishing myself a happy new year whilst hoisting a glass of Clamato juice cocktail. Not this year. I slept through the entire thing. Not that it matters. The new year doesn’t mean much to me, (and I daresay to any of my fellow residents, either). The only significant change will be an almost 6% increase to our monthly social security benefits. However, even that will be tarnished by an increase in our Medicare premiums and, for us here at the A.L.F. and increase in our monthly room and board too. “What they giveth, they taketh away.”

New Year's Day proved no more exciting than New Year's Eve. Breakfast was as dull as ever. No hangover Bloody Mary’s or Mmosa's. There was an omelet and a dry sausage patty and the coffee was hot and strong, but otherwise nothing special. Just as well. There were not too many diners present, anyway. Where were they? Had our New Year’s Eve party (which wrapped-up about 9pm) taken its toll? Maybe I should have gone. I heard there was sparkling cider. Oh, well. There’s always next year. If I live that long. I ain’t getting any younger after all………………………….
 




Here’s what to know about your 2022 Medicare costs
By Sarah O’Brien


When the calendar flips to 2022, certain Medicare costs will creep higher.



For the program’s 63.6 million beneficiaries — most of whom are 65 or older — annual adjustments can affect premiums, deductibles and other cost-sharing aspects of Medicare. While each change doesn’t necessarily involve a huge dollar amount, experts say it’s important to consider how any increases will affect your household budget.

“This year, it is especially important to be aware of the increasing costs of Medicare because it’s happening at a time where we are also experiencing inflation,” said Danielle Roberts, co-founder of insurance firm Boomer Benefits. “Planning ahead for ways to reduce your expenses may make a bigger impact this year.”





Social Security recipients are getting a big raise
-- but also are falling further behind

By Paul Brandus


What Social Security giveth, the grocery store, landlord and pharmacy taketh away.



In October, the Social Security Administration announced that recipients would get a cost-of-living raise of 5.9%. That means the average recipient will get an estimated $1,674 a month beginning with the January check, equal to $20,088 a year.   

But weeks later, Labor Department said the inflation rate—the cost-of-living index—jumped 6.8% for the 12 months ended Nov. 30, the fastest inflation rate since 1982. Food, housing, all the basics, are shooting up.




Social Security Benefits 2022:
How Medicare Will Significantly Impact
Those Earning Less

By Vance Cariaga


The 5.9% raise Social Security recipients will get in 2022 is the largest in 40 years, but for those whose checks are not that big, the raise will barely be enough to offset higher Medicare Part B costs.




Next year’s cost-of-living adjustment will increase the average retirement check by $92 to $1,657 a month, according to an analysis by AARP. The maximum monthly benefit for a worker who retired at full retirement age will climb by $197 to $3,345.

Even Social Security recipients who are lower on the financial scale will get a boost, with the maximum monthly payment for this group rising by $47 to $841 for individuals and by $70 to $1,261 for couples.



THERE'S A NEW RECALL ON THIS MEDICATION,
WHICH COULD CONTAIN A DANGEROUS SUBSTANCE.

By ALESANDRA DUBIN

Many Americans take regular daily medications without much thought. But a new drug recall of a common medication requires that you take a closer look at your medicine cabinet, just in case something you're taking could be affected. If it is, you'll need to reach out to a doctor immediately to determine next steps. Read on to learn which medication has been recalled, and what to do if you have it at home.



Viona Pharmaceuticals is recalling multiple lots of the type 2 diabetes drug metformin.

The Cranford, New Jersey-based company Viona Pharmaceuticals Inc. is voluntarily recalling 33 different lots of its 750-milligram metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, according to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA). The reason for the recall is that the drugs could contain too much N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which is "classified as a probable human carcinogen," meaning it could cause cancer based on results from laboratory tests.




Replace Your Vital Records



Find out how to replace vital documents, such as birth certificates, Social Security cards, and more.

On This Page

    How to Replace Lost or Stolen ID Cards
    Vital Records Issued in the United States
    Get a Copy of Your Birth Certificate
    How to Get a Copy of a Marriage Certificate or a
Marriage  License
    How to Get a Certified Copy of a Death Certificate
    Divorce Decrees and Certificates
    How to Find Adoption Records
    How to Replace Lost or Stolen ID Cards

Rules for replacing government-issued ID cards vary. Many require you to show an official document, like your birth certificate. This proves your identity or citizenship.






In case your first weekend of the new year was not as much fun as you would have liked, here’s something to keep you enthralled for ten minutes until you get so frustrated you’ll want to throw something at your computer.

The concept is very simple. Just try to balance the rocks





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Answer to our Facebook Question

It’s Angela Cartwright.





Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952) is a British-American actress primarily known for her roles in movies and television. Cartwright became known in movies as a child actress for her role as Brigitta von Trapp in the film The Sound of Music (1965). On television, she played Linda Williams, the stepdaughter of Danny Williams (played by Danny Thomas) in the 1950s TV series The Danny Thomas Show, and Penny Robinson in the 1960s television series Lost in Space. Her older sister is actress Veronica Cartwright.











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NEXT NEW BLOG, TUESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Sunday, January 2, 2022


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







FROM THE EDITOR…

A Grim Ending To Bad Year

One year ago, residents here were firmly entrenched in what would become an unprecedented 16 month quarantine. More than a year had gone by with no end to the threats from COVID-19 in sight. Fortunately, vaccines were developed and cases of the virus dropped dramatically. More importantly, the number of people who died or needed to be hospitalized lessened in proportion. Things improved enough that we could resume most of the activities here, including communal dining. That was a dim ray of hope at the end of a long, dark tunnel. Unfortunately, despite observing the strictest infection control procedures and having almost all of our staff and residents vaccinated, COVID reared its ugly head, forcing us back into a 4-week-lock down. That’s what we have had to deal with. And now, as we approach the new year,we remain in the grip of a pandemic that just won’t go away. What makes this sadder is, it doesn’t have to be this way. The answer is simple. Vaccinate everybody.


A simple solution made by a simple-minded person, you say? Maybe. But we all know it’s the truth. Unfortunately, over one-third of the population of the most scientifically advance society in the world does not believe in science or are just too dumb to know the difference. One hundred million of us, under a threat of death, walk around, unprotected, leaving us in the exact same position we were in 12 months ago, facing another miserable year of wearing masks, quarantines, lock-downs, illness and worse.
 
I used to be an optimist. I believed that, in time, all that is bad will disappear. But not anymore. My view of the world has transformed. Especially towards my fellow citizens. At the very least, I thought a parent would do almost anything to protect the lives of their children, even to where they would sacrifice themselves to do so. I now know that’s not true. This new variant has targeted the young and unvaccinated, and yet millions of parents remain unphased by the stats shunning the one thing that we know will protect them.

What will the new year bring. No one knows for sure. But I will go outr on a limb and make one prediction. Next year I will write a similar story to this. The number of unvaccinated will remain the same as will the number of infections and we will look forward to our fourth and fifth year of all this.

That being said, I’m still going to wish all of you a Happy New Year. Just surviving this year has proven you are an intelligent, resilient lot. And I’m proud to have you as readers of this blog……………






JANUARY 2, 2022


The Perils of Downsizing

Okay, I'm gonna blame this on my husband because husbands are good for that sort of thing. But the truth? I should have known better. When Bob and I decided to downsize from a three-story house to a three-bedroom condo, there was the inevitable deciding what would go, what would stay, what would be given away, what would be discarded.


As we made our decisions, it became increasingly clear to me that what I found most painful to part with was my vast library of hundreds, probably thousands, of books.


Bob was unsympathetic. He'd downsized twice before and had had no difficulty getting rid of books that he'd already read. What could I possibly want with all those yellowing and often crumbling pages that I'd likely never look at again?




Sex and Our Aging Bodies

As we get older, it pays to keep the passion alive. Sexual health is a vital part of our overall well-being, and its health benefits are well-studied. Sexual activity with or without a partner can help burn calories, strengthen your muscles, lower your blood pressure, and even reduce your risk for heart disease. It’s also been linked to better sleep, a stronger immune system, and relief from headaches.


The role of aging in sexual health

What happens to sexual activity in the elderly? This question likely crosses all of our minds as the number of birthday candles on our cake gets bigger. It's no secret that aging comes with unique challenges—and plenty of changes that can affect our sexual health.

What kinds of changes happen to our bodies as we age?




Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids Are Coming:
What You Need to Know

By Kathleen Cameron

Hearing loss is a sudden or gradual decrease in how well you can hear and is one of the most common conditions affecting older adults. Approximately one in three people between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss and nearly half of those older than 75 has difficulty hearing.



Hearing loss can impact all aspects of life, including making it hard to understand and follow a doctor's advice, respond to warnings, and hear doorbells and alarms. Hearing loss also makes it harder to participate in conversations with friends and family and enjoy entertainment like movies and concerts. This can be frustrating, embarrassing, and even dangerous. Hearing loss has also been associated with higher rates of depression and social isolation among older adults.

The good news is that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued draft guidelines for over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids, a first step toward giving Americans more options for mild to moderate hearing loss. The FDA's proposed rule was designed to  help increase competition in the market while also ensuring the safety and effectiveness of OTC and prescription hearing aids.




5 Foods to Say No to After 50
By Alison Gwinn

We're not going to lie. Eating healthily after 50 means effort on two fronts: boosting your intake of good-for-you foods such as berries, leafy greens, whole grains and lean proteins while cutting out the foods that clog your arteries and oh-so-easily expand your waistline.


When it comes to the latter, focus less on making certain foods verboten (who doesn't suddenly want chocolate when told never to eat it?) and more on how your health is more important than the sugar spike or instant satiety they offer. When possible, just say no — or at least “Whoa!” — to the following.

Skip it: Fried foods that triple the calories

If it helps, pause to imagine the vat of oil that basket of fries or onion rings has been submerged in, and consider how its saturated fat “may have a negative impact on blood cholesterol,” says Amy Gorin, a registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats in Stamford, Connecticut. Not sure how to cut back? Here are three expert tips:




Write a letter to the future

Write a letter to the future: set goals for yourself, make a prediction about the world. Envision the future, and then make it happen. FutureMe has been delivering letters to the future for millions of people since 2002.





Go to >> https://www.futureme.org/?utm_campaign=mb&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_source=morning_brew






Social Security moves married couples
should make before claiming benefits

====================================================================
4 Superfoods for Your Brain
By Nissa Simon
Read more  >>  https://blog.aarp.org/staying-sharp/superfoods-for-your-brain/?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-SSS--CTRL-122121-P7-6019246&ET_CID=6019246&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
====================================================================
7 Steps to Take After a Diabetes Diagnosis
By Leslie Goldman
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/tips-for-managing-diabetes.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-121621-P1-6007674&ET_CID=6007674&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
====================================================================
At the End of Life, Some Are Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/vsed-option/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=38f63d2f1f-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_19_03_37&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-38f63d2f1f-165407981&mc_cid=38f63d2f1f&mc_eid=94767a79b9
====================================================================
Can humans live forever?
Why there may be “no limit” to longevity

By Tom Siegfried
Read more  >>  https://www.inverse.com/mind-body/can-humans-live-forever
====================================================================
Shouldn’t we allow ourselves grow old gracefully
and not be full of fear?

By Áine Ryan
Read more  >>  https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/health-family/shouldn-t-we-allow-ourselves-grow-old-gracefully-and-not-be-full-of-fear-1.4744965
====================================================================
Does Wisdom Really Come from Experience?
By Rachel Syme
Read more  >>  https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2022/01/03/does-wisdom-really-come-from-experience
====================================================================
If You're Over 65, Never Do This With Your Phone
By Kali Coleman
Read more  >>  https://bestlifeonline.com/over-65-rush-phone-news/
====================================================================
6 Ways to Stay Physically Active in Winter
By Kathleen Zuke
Read more  >>  https://www.ncoa.org/article/6-ways-to-stay-physically-active-in-the-winter?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CHA
====================================================================
How to Budget Effectively When in Retirement
By Jordan Bishop
Read more  >>  https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/410198
====================================================================
Pfizer's Covid pills may be risky with other medications
By Benjamin Ryan
Read more  >>  https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/pfizer-covid-pills-covid-symptoms-may-risky-drugs-rcna9683
====================================================================
Ageism exists even among the elderly
Read more  >> https://californianewstimes.com/ageism-exists-even-among-the-elderly-new-research/637203/
====================================================================
If You're Over 65, Never Do This In the Bathroom
By Lauren Gray
Read more  >>  https://bestlifeonline.com/news-over-65-bathroom/
====================================================================
Helping a Loved One Live Independently at Home​ ​
By Amy Goyer
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2021/tips-for-aging-independently.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-LISR-CAREGIVING--NMCTRL-122821-HT5-6035612&ET_CID=6035612&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d







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NEXT NEW BLOG MONDAY, JANUARY 3. 2022





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Good Day. It’s Thursday, December 30, 2021


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com








Editorial comment……


                            At The A.L.F….
Waiting For The Other Shoe To Drop


The feeling here at the A.L.F. is not “if” but “when”, the latest round of COVID will hit.
 
We’ve seen this before. Reports of infection in the area grow. More and more people testing positive. Precautions for the facility increased.[1] All a prelude to what’s coming. Another quarantine/lockdown that could last anywhere from two weeks to two months or more.
 
All it takes is for three or more residents to test positive and back to our rooms we go to sit, watch TV and eat meals (alone) from Styrofoam plates.
 
Even though we are currently observing the strictest infection control protocols as mandated by the state health department, our vulnerability to the disease remains high. Old folks, so it appears, are the first to get sick despite that we are all fully vaccinated.
 
Unfortunately. Our residents are becoming used to this and will take whatever comes in stride. Speaking to some of them today, many told me they enjoy having their meals brought to them as long as it’s not for too long a period. As a veteran of many lock-downs here over the years (we’ve had outbreaks of norovirus that have shut us down for weeks) I can handle whatever happens. Sadly, for some of our more fragile residents, any prolonged quarantine could devastate their mental as well as physical health.
 
All I can say is, it would be very sad if we had to spend another New Year’s Eve alone, in our rooms……………………..
 
 [1] As of Monday, the staff was required to wear a face shield in addition to the regular mask while in the building.






Pfizer's Covid pills may be risky with other medications
By Benjamin Ryan


As the omicron surge pummels a pandemic-weary nation, the first antiviral pills for Covid-19 promise desperately needed protection for people at risk of severe disease. However, many people prescribed Pfizer’s or Merck’s new medications will require careful monitoring by doctors and pharmacists, and the antivirals may not be safe for everyone, experts caution.
Paxlovid, Pfizer's Covid-19 pill, is manufactured in Ascoli, Italy.



The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer’s Paxlovid for mild to moderate Covid in people as young as 12 who have underlying conditions that raise the risk of hospitalization and death from the coronavirus, such as heart disease or diabetes. However, one of the two drugs in the antiviral cocktail could cause severe or life-threatening interactions with widely used medications, including statins, blood thinners and some antidepressants. And the FDA does not recommend Paxlovid for people with severe kidney or liver disease.




Ageism exists even among the elderly

“We don’t always want to trip over Zimmer’s frame,” said John *, 73. He was clearly frustrated and expressed strong opposition to the older, more frail residents of the retired village. John and his wife, Jean, had moved to an elderly housing with care about a year ago. When they moved in, they obviously didn’t expect to meet really old people. “It’s melancholy,” he continued.


In our study — Geron Trogist— Conducted 80 detailed interviews with senior citizens Man About the experience of life in retirement English and Australian villages. We were particularly interested in why people want a life after retirement and how their needs match or conflict with the needs of other residents. I didn’t expect there to be such a high grudge among the inhabitants, but I did.

Life after retirement is a big company. It is estimated About 5% of Australians, 6% of Americans, and 1% of British citizens over the age of 65 live in retirement. village.. researcher He argues that one of the problems with Elderly Housing with Care is that they tend to treat “elderly people” as more or less the same category, just because they are over 60 years old. It ranges from 60 to over 90 for up to 30 years.




The Graying Of America
By John Grimaldi

We’re seeing more and more people with gray hair these days. But it’s not only because the population is growing old at a fast pace as 10,000 boomer babies turn 65 each and every day and because the population will continue aging at that rate for some time to come. It’s all about the stresses of the 21st century, not the least of which is the COVID crisis. As a result, more and more of us – including those as young as 20 years old – are being subjected to extreme pressures, which can also turn your hair gray, so say the scientists.



The Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC) tracked down the science of the “graying of America” and the good news is that it is not irreversible, at least for the youngsters. “All you have to do is calm down,” says AMAC CEO Rebecca Weber, “and chances are you won’t have to make a trip to the barber or a beauty salon for a dye job.”




If You're Over 65, Never Do This In the Bathroom
By Lauren Gray

You're probably overlooking this serious safety hazard. Here's how to avoid it.



A lot can change with age, and for some seniors, those changes may include their bathroom habits. A 2014 report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveals that 51 percent of adults over the age of 65 suffer from bladder or bowel incontinence—a pair of conditions that often cause a frequent, sudden, or uncontrollable urge to go. "We found that half the population experienced urinary leakage or accidental bowel leakage, and about 25 percent had moderate, severe or very severe urinary leakage," explains the report's lead researcher, Yelena Gorina, a statistician at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

While incontinence is undoubtedly a problem in itself, experts now warn that there's one surprising way the condition could put your health at additional risk. Read on to find out what you should never do in the bathroom over the age of 65.




Helping a Loved One Live Independently at Home​ ​
By Amy Goyer

According to AARP’s "Home and Community Preferences" survey, 3 out of 4 adults age 50 or older say they want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. And many do: Nearly 9 in 10 care recipients live in their own home, in someone else’s home or in their caregiver’s home. Some homes are well-suited for aging and providing care, but many require modifications.



When my parents needed 24-hour care and moved in with me, we didn't have the budget to build an addition or completely revamp the house. But with some research and advice, I found easier, affordable ways to make the home safe and navigable. And I continued to adapt as their needs changed. Eventually, I was able to fully remodel a bathroom for Dad’s safety, as well as get entry threshold ramps.

The goal is to help loved ones be as independent as possible at home, for as long as possible. To tailor your or your loved ones’ residence for care at home, you can start with a home assessment by an occupational therapist, physical therapist, geriatric care manager (aging life care specialist), certified aging-in-place specialist (CAPS) or qualified professional via the area agency on aging or Department of Veterans Affairs.







What is Phishing?
Learn How You Can Keep
Your Private Data Safe



Elderly scams are a multi-million dollar business that robs seniors of their hard-earned savings, retirement funds, and even government benefits.


The financial damage can be devastating: in 2020, the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) reported losses in excess of $966 million for people age 60 and over.


While there are many methods cyber criminals use to defraud older adults, phishing is one of the internet’s oldest and most well-known scams.









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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, December 29, 2021


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com









FROM THE EDITOR…



As we approach the end of 2021, it is obligatory for all writers of blogs, newsletters and news sites to recap the important events of the year.

Scroll through GOOGLE looking for year-end wrap-ups and you will find long lists of everything from “The best movies of 2021”, “The years top music hits’’, “Best dog breeds of the year” and long lists of famous people who died. And I could do the same, but I won’t. It’s boring to read and most of the lists represent only numbers. Just because something makes the “list” does not mean it’s really the best. So, instead of burdening you with endless columns of inane statistics, I will narrow down 2021 into just a few highs and lows.

    The Highs:
 
          Donald Trump is no longer the President.
 
Say what you want about the state of the nation under Biden. Heaven knows he’s made some errors. But isn’t it refreshing not to have to hear lies and stupidity coming from the mouth of “The leader of the free world” for a change.
 
          Vaccines that work.
 
Real scientists invented real vaccines that have prevented the deaths of possibly millions of people the world over. And now, a pill is on the way that will lessen the severity of the illness for millions more.
 

    The Lows:
 
          The pandemic continues.
 
Over two years have gone by and the COVID virus is still very much with us.
 
          Anti-vaxxers.

Despite all efforts, 1/3 of the U.S. population remains unvaccinated. That’s over 100 million people who are either naïve, uninformed, misinformed, politically motivated, or just plain dumb.


         January 6th insurrection.
 
We came very close to an all-out overtake of the Congress on that day spurred on by a defeated president who perpetuated the lie that the election was rigged. Unfortunately, he persists in his fantasy, causing a rift in our democracy that may never heal.
 
         Failure of Biden’s “Build Back America” legislation.
 
Because more members of congress have decided that spending money to make the lives of Americans better is not important enough to even come to a compromise, legislation that would have meant free higher education, improving our infrastructure and our environment and much more will not happen.
 
         Guns.
 
Gun violence continues unabated.

I know, it’s a short list. There’s probably much more I should have included. But it’s getting late, and my mind is too cluttered with personal matters to care to put any more thought into this. If you have anything you want to add, feel free to let me know, and I’ll try to include them. ….
 
 




If You're Over 65, Never Do This With Your Phone
By Kali Coleman

As we get older, it's a lot easier to put our health at risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the population of older U.S. adults is growing and seniors are living longer than ever—but age still brings about an increase in health concerns, particularly the prevalence of chronic diseases. At the same time, many of the health problems we face as we age could be a direct result of our daily habits. In fact, experts say one common phone behavior could disproportionally affect the health and well-being of older adults. Read on to find out what you should never be doing if you're over 65.


Rushing to answer the phone can be very dangerous for anyone, but especially those who are 65 years old or older, says Dorothea Hudson, a senior care expert who works QuickQuote, a life insurance company. According to Hudson, older adults trying to get to their phone to answer it before it stops ringing is one of the most common reasons they end up falling.


"The sudden burst of physical activity required to reach a corded phone in time to answer it is enough to cause an elderly person to lose their balance," she explains. "Falls are often a life-threatening experience for those 65 and older as well, so they are disproportionately affected."




Deciphering senior housing options

Selling your home and downsizing is a difficult decision and process for seniors.

Dear Savvy Senior,


Can you decipher the different types of housing options available to seniors, and recommend some good resources for locating them? I need to find a place for my elderly mother and could use some help.

                                    Overwhelmed Daughter

Dear Overwhelmed,

There’s a wide array of housing options available to seniors, but what’s appropriate for your mom will depend on her needs and financial situation. Here’s a rundown of the different levels of senior housing and some resources to help you choose one.




7 Easy Hand Exercises to Prevent Arthritis
By Jessica Migala

Karen Jacobs noticed a stiffness settling into her hands. “It can be really painful throughout the day,” she says. When it didn’t resolve, the 70-year-old arranged a telehealth visit with her doctor. His diagnosis: She was experiencing the beginning of osteoarthritis (OA), the most common type of arthritis.


OA is a condition caused by the natural wearing away of the cartilage that covers the bone, says Michelle G. Carlson, M.D., hand and upper extremity surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. In healthy joints, the cartilage coverings at the ends of the bones match up and glide smoothly against one another. But as arthritis wears the cartilage away, the movement becomes less smooth, often leading to stiffness, loss of motion and pain, especially in the tip joint of the finger. It’s estimated that we have a 40 percent risk of developing symptomatic osteoarthritis during our lifetime, according to research in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

But while you can’t build back cartilage, you can preserve motion by keeping the soft tissue in the joint as supple as possible.



6 Ways to Stay Physically Active in Winter
By Kathleen Zuke

No matter your age, staying active is key to aging well—and there's scientific evidence to prove it. When adults exercise regularly, benefits include improved cardiovascular and muscle fitness, improved brain health, and better ability to do tasks of daily life.


According to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) recent Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (2019):

Half of all American adults—117 million people—have one or more preventable chronic diseases.
Seven of the 10 of the most common chronic diseases are favorably influenced by regular physical activity.




How to Budget Effectively When in Retirement
By Jordan Bishop

If you think budgeting and financial planning is only for those getting ready for retirement, think again. Budgeting during retirement is as important and even more so than during your working years because you don’t usually have a steady paycheck to look forward to.



That said, budgeting during retirement is based on the same principles as before. Nevertheless, there are new things to look out for that make it extra important to plan ahead, so you don’t find yourself old and broke during your final years on this earth. This is why, in this post, I’ll cover the most important steps to budget effectively during retirement.

Step #1: Set clear goals

The main goal of budgeting during retirement is for your money to last for the rest of your life while allowing you to live comfortably. However, there may be other important things you want to do, like a....






Discounts and Free Services
for Seniors and Their Caregivers
By Tony Rovere


These days, many older adults are living on limited incomes from sources like Social Security benefits and meager retirement savings. Finding affordable products and services is crucial to making ends meet. Numerous resources exist, but most of them are either difficult to find, confusing to apply for or largely unheard of.


Your local Area Agency on Aging (the names of these offices may differ) is the best place to begin when looking for assistance. Local charities and larger nonprofit organizations, such as Lions Clubs and Meals on Wheels America, can also be great sources of help.

In my opinion, the most valuable items for seniors—things like free hearing aids and free dentures—are the most difficult to come by. Drawing from my experiences as a caregiver for my mom, I have compiled a list of useful and affordable products and services and a roadmap for finding them.












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NEXT NEW BLOG, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, December 28, 2021



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Can humans live forever?
Why there may be “no limit” to longevity

By Tom Siegfried

In 1875, Harper’s Weekly declared one Lomer Griffin of Lodi, Ohio, to be, “in all probability,” the oldest man in the union. His age, allegedly, was 116.



There were doubters. Lomer’s own wife, for instance, said he was only 103. And William John Thoms, an English author, and demographer who had just written a book on human longevity expressed skepticism of all such centenarian claims. A human’s maximum life span was about 100, Thoms asserted. Certainly, no claim of age over 110 had ever been verified.

“Evidence of any human being having attained the age, not of 130 or 140, but of 110 years … will be found upon examination utterly worthless,” he wrote.




Shouldn’t we allow ourselves grow old gracefully
and not be full of fear?

By Áine Ryan

It didn’t dawn on me until I drove into my supermarket carpark here in Westport and compliantly awaited instructions from the guy who directs traffic.


It’s a busy carpark, even long after the tourists have gathered up their buckets and spades, surfboards and snorkels, and escaped back across the Shannon to the familiar sounds of M50 gridlock.

So, I’m sitting third in the queue when suddenly he-who-must-be -obeyed is ordering me to let down my window.





Study finds positive Effects
of academic education on Aging of Brain
By Amit Malewar

Good education benefits a person by having a good personality and a promising career.

Now, a study added one more extraordinary benefit of a good education.



The benefits of good education and lifelong learning extend into old age.

The initial findings of a long-term study show that specific degenerative processes are reduced in the brains of academics. Their brains are better able to compensate for age-related cognitive and neural limitations.





Does Wisdom Really Come from Experience?
By Rachel Syme

In March of 1995, Mitch Albom, a sportswriter for the Detroit Free Press, was up late channel surfing when he saw a familiar face on the screen. Morris (Morrie) Schwartz, his Brandeis sociology professor, was suffering from A.L.S., and talking sagely on “Nightline” about his impending death. Albom, who had promised Schwartz that he would keep in touch but hadn’t written to him in sixteen years, saw this as a cosmic sign—or a journalistic opportunity—and visited Schwartz more than a dozen times in the next few months. He recorded their conversations about life and love, hoping to sell the transcript and pay off Schwartz’s medical bills, but he struggled to find a buyer, and Schwartz died a few weeks after Doubleday agreed to take the project. The rest is the stuff of book-business legend: “Tuesdays with Morrie,” which came out in 1997, became one of the best-selling memoirs of all time, moving more than fifteen million copies in more than forty-one languages.


What made the thoughts of this seventy-eight-year-old so popular? Schwartz’s axioms—such as “Love each other or perish” and “Money is not a substitute for tenderness”—were not particularly revelatory. It was his proximity to death, and his nearly eight decades of experience, that turned his platitudes into a pop-cultural phenomenon. Eager not to waste our lives, we tend to devour lessons from people approaching the end of theirs. There’s something macabre about this appetite, the way it turns an aging mind into a consumable product. It can feel especially rapacious ....




How to Get Tech Support for Gifts During the Holidays
By Marc Saltzman

Even if you didn’t shamelessly hint to family and friends about a specific gadget gift you’d love to unwrap this holiday, chances are you’ll find something techy under the tree this year.



From tablets and e-readers to smartwatches and activity trackers to mobile phones and smart home gear, tech is one of the — if not the —  hottest gifts of 2021. But what if you can’t figure out how to use your new toy? You’re not alone.

After all, it’s not like we grew up with these gizmos. So chances are good that you’ll have questions, or even challenges, as you familiarize yourself with these devices and what they can do.






Breaking Down the Cost to Install a Stair Lift
By Katie Flannery

If you or a family member are having difficulty navigating up and down stairs due to an injury, illness, or mobility issues, a stair lift may be the solution. A stair chair lift is a motor-operated device that follows a track up and down the stairs to assist someone who is unable to navigate the stairs in their home. According to HomeAdvisor, stair lift costs range between $2,000 and $15,000, with the national average at $6,000. The price can vary because of the style and length of the lift; a

curved or extended lift can cost between $9,000 and $15,000, but a standard straight lift shorter than 15 feet might only cost between $2,000 and $6,000. The benefits of installing a stairlift outweigh the price for many homeowners. Having a stairlift ensures independence and safety for those who need it.



Think it's time to install a stair lift?


Many factors impact stair lift cost. Prices differ from the national average due to staircase type, shape, length, installation and labor costs, lift and seat type, power source, and brand.












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Good Day. It’s Monday, December 27, 2021



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From the editor….





Santa visited the A.L.F. this year, and the residents were not happy with what he brought them.
In the past, Santa has given us such useful and thoughtful items like hooded sweatshirts, thermal blankets, scarves, caps, and travel mugs and other gifts, specifically chosen for the individual resident. This year was an exception.
 
While many of the gifts may have been of some practical use, it was easy to see that little or no thought was made to “personalize” any of them. Instead of appearing like they were given by a caring friend, the “merchandise’ looked like stuff one would receive in a welcome basket at an assisted living trade show.
 
Among the gifts was a mug emblazoned with the Westchester Center logo. A wall calendar, again imprinted with the W. Center logo. A miniature sample of Westchester Center branded hand sanitizer. And a ballpoint pen. Also included in the bag (a faux canvas shopping bag, again, imprinted with the Westchester Center logo) were some Xmas appropriate candies and a bottle of questionably scented men’s spray scent for the men. The ladies received only the branded merchandise.

 
Don’t misunderstand me. I personally don’t care about receiving gifts. Fortunately, I can buy all the hats, scarves and sweatshirts I need. However, there are many folks here that feel we were shortchanged. Myself among them.
 
Consider what the residents of this facility had to endure this year…


- A 16-month quarantine/lockdown which kept us apart from our friends and loved ones and responsible for immeasurable harm to our mental and emotional wellbeing.

-The strictest infection control protocols in the nation, which continue to this day and wreak havoc on our daily lives.

-The constant threat of infection from new forms of the virus.

 With all that, plus not knowing what the future has in store for us, I think Santa could have been kinder to us with something better than a tax write-off ………..........
 
 




How Climate Change May Affect Your Retirement

“Most people want to escape the winters of the Northeast or the high taxes of certain states, but [climate change] may make them pause and do a little bit more research,” says Certified Financial Planner James Ciprich. “Proximity to health care and low taxes are always attractive options, but now, especially for seniors, you almost need to be thinking in terms of what is my contingency plan in the event of a weather disaster.”



According to NASA, climate change is impacting weather events across the country. Recent years have brought devastating hurricanes to the Eastern Seaboard, flooding in the Midwest and South, and wildfires in the West. It appears we can expect more of the same in the future, with rising sea levels and continued warming. How will this affect older adults?

It’s likely the result will be seen in three areas:




7 Steps to Take After a Diabetes Diagnosis
By Leslie Goldman

In 2017, Bruno Graizzaro weighed 298 pounds and was a self-described “massive eater.” Having lived with type 2 diabetes for 11 years, he was on high doses of injectable insulin, took an oral diabetes drug and was haunted by the specters of multiple family members who had struggled with diabetes, including his father, who lost a leg to the disease. “I was so entrenched in poor eating that I just relied on the medicines to control my blood sugar,” he says.


​​Then he met an endocrinologist at the UMass Diabetes Center of Excellence who suggested a different approach: committing to a combination of healthy nutrition and exercise, which he would jump-start with two newer diabetes drugs that also promote weight loss. Today, at 64, the Boston accounting executive has lost more than 60 pounds, exercises four to five days a week (basketball, squash, yoga and strength training are favorites) and needs only minimal insulin.​​

Insulin is the hormone that moves sugar out of the blood and into the body’s cells. With diabetes, the body either can’t create the hormone (type 1) or, more commonly, becomes resistant to its effects (type 2). In both cases, insulin injections are a common treatment. (January marks the 100th anniversary of the first use of insulin in a diabetes patient.)


At the End of Life,
Some Are Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands

Some patients diagnosed with terminal illnesses or chronic progressive diseases find the prospect of a long decline, great suffering or significant deterioration to be intolerable.


For those with the desire to hasten their own death, one option is to refuse to swallow food or sip liquids. The practice, known as "voluntarily stopping eating and drinking," or VSED, typically results in death within 10 days to two weeks.

"People have been dying this way since time began. It's a natural way of dying, but people should know they can't do this by themselves. They need to be attended by those who are knowledgeable about symptom management who can help them have the least bad death possible," said Judith Schwarz, the clinical director of End of Life Choices New York.




Here are the trends shaping senior living development

America is aging. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s National Population Projections, in the next few decades, 1 in every 5 residents will be older than age 65, a number that’s projected to outpace those younger than 18 for the first time in history.


“There are 10,000 people turning 65 every day in our country,” notes Sharon Harper, chairman, CEO and co-founder of Plaza Companies, which develops and manages three retirement communities in Arizona: Vi at Grayhawk and Vi at Silverstone, both in Scottsdale, and Splendido at Rancho Vistoso in Tucson. “By 2050, the senior population will have doubled to 90 million.” More specifically, the number of adults ages 85 and older will nearly quadruple. And as people age, their needs — from housing to wellness — change. To keep up with these ever-shifting lifestyles, senior living communities are also evolving, offering innovative care models, an abundance of amenities and levels of luxury previously unheard of in both independent- and assisted-living environments.




10 Ways to Improve Your Home For Older Adults
By Sarah Elizabeth Adler


Is your loved one aging in place? Part of helping someone do that successfully involves limiting risks — but at the same time allowing for Mom, Dad or another family member to maintain independence. Consider these smart choices around the house for added safety, autonomy and a sense of connection.


1. Smart speakers

These multipurpose devices function like voice-controlled virtual assistants: Ask to listen to music, set medication reminders, hear the weather forecast or even control compatible home fixtures such as a smart thermostat with the sound of your voice.

2. Nonslip rug grips



Slippery area rugs pose a fall risk and can be tricky to navigate for those who use mobility aids like a walker or cane. If you don’t want to remove area rugs altogether, consider adding a nonslip layer for safety: Opt for a nonskid carpet pad under each rug, or use adhesive corner grips or double-sided carpet tape to secure edges and keep corners from curling.

















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Good Day. It’s Sunday, December 26, 2021



Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com








Another COVID Christmas.
But Things Could Be Worse.


I want to take this opportunity to wish all of you peace, joy, love, happiness and good health on this Christmas eve and in the new year to come. It’s been a tough year for many people, especially for those of us who are residents of long-term care facilities. We have had to endure much in the way of extraordinary restrictions on our freedoms and the constant threat to our lives.


 Unfortunately, these anti-infection protocols will extend into the new year and beyond. The only ray of light is a decrease in the number of cases and zero fatalities in our facility. I am also thankful that all of my friends, both here and out in the world, are alive and well. As are all of my relatives. Fortunately, although many of them may not have the same political views as I, they are smart enough to get vaccinated and, therefore, will be around to enjoy the holiday season.



Many folks had hoped that by now America, and the world, would have been rid of this pandemic that has caused nothing but misery, suffering and death and unprecedented divisiveness among us. But as bad as things may appear, we should be able to find solace because we now have many ways of combating the virus we did not have last year at this time. The only problem is, we still have one-third of the population who cannot face reality and get vaccinated. I’m guessing, these are the same people who still believe in Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, and Donald Trump…...............…





DECEMBER 26, 2021



Social Security moves married couples
should make before claiming benefits


Whether you're single during retirement or married, there's a good chance Social Security will end up serving as an essential income source for you. But if you're married, you may have more options than the average senior who's single when it comes to maximizing those benefits. And so before you file for Social Security, make certain to check these important items off your list.



If you and your spouse each worked, you may each be entitled to your own Social Security benefit. But there may be a big discrepancy in those benefits, and so knowing what to expect could help guide your filing decision -- both individually and jointly.


Imagine you earned a lot more than your spouse during your career, and so you're now in line for a higher monthly benefit. What you may opt to do in that case is have your spouse file for Social Security right away while you delay your filing. Doing so will allow your benefit to grow into a larger amount, while your spouse's filing might give you access to the income you need immediately.




Transitioning from assisted living to a nursing home
By Rebecca A Hobbs


Assisted living or personal care facilities are often a transitional living option for a senior who is no longer able to live independently in their own home and requires some assistance with activities of daily living.  When the senior’s level of care need increases beyond that which an assisted living or personal care facility can provide, it often becomes necessary to transition the senior to skilled nursing care. This transition can be drastic for some depending on the facility the senior is being moved to.  Skilled nursing care is a high level of medical care providing 24/7 assistance with health care and activities of daily living. This care must be provided by or under the direct supervision of licensed health professionals. Skilled nursing care is the most expensive level of care. However, unlike an assisted living facility, in Pennsylvania Medicaid will pay for skilled nursing care, if the individual meets the eligibility requirements.


Assisted living and personal care facilities offer living accommodations with the addition of assistance with some activities of daily living.  Examples of the assistance that may be offered include medication management, housekeeping, meals, laundry, transportation, social programs, and assistance with dressing and grooming. The primary difference between an assisted living or personal care facility is how they are licensed. The terms used to be used interchangeably until 2011, when Pennsylvania began to distinguish between the two.  An assisted living facility does all that a personal care facility does but also provides some skilled health care services to supplement the personal care. There are also differences in the regulations on not only the offering of services, but also the accommodations and building.

Below are some tips to consider when transitioning a love one from assisted living or personal care to a skilled nursing facility:




Where's the logic in giving seniors discounts?
By Barry Fagin

I got my first senior citizen discount last week. Don’t tell the AARP, but discounts based on age make absolutely no sense.



Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely qualify. I turned 61 three months ago. Apparently 60 is the standard borderline for geezerhood. At some businesses, senility starts at 55. To think of all the money I wasted paying the same prices as my less chronologically gifted citizens. What can I say? I haven’t answered yes to the question of “senior?” since my last year of college. Old habits die hard, I guess.

So if you want to give me a discount based on how many solar orbits I’ve done, I won’t stop you. But let’s at least ask ourselves what this is truly for, and whether or not it makes any sense.




4 Superfoods for Your Brain
By Nissa Simon

It's simple: What you eat influences how you think. Your food choices affect your brain and may even spell the difference between clear thinking and the forgetfulness that tends to develop with age. The food you eat may also influence your mood.


That said, it's important to keep in mind that no single food can guarantee brain health. A healthy brain depends on having a healthy body, notes Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Good blood circulation is important, so healthy fats and healthy carbohydrates are a good beginning," he says. Colorful vegetables, tangy fruits, whole-grain breads, eggs, nuts, beans and berries all belong on this list.

Here are four foods that help keep both your brain and your body healthy:




Chair exercises are beneficial for older adults

For older adults, regular exercise is one of the most important things a person can do for their health, said Gina Peek, Oklahoma State University Extension housing and consumer specialist and interim associate dean.


“Exercise helps your muscles stay strong so you can keep doing your day-to-day activities. You don’t even need to have a gym membership or have expensive equipment to stay active,” Peek said. “OSU Extension offers organized classes such as Walk with Ease and Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance, but some older adults may have mobility issues that make it difficult to get out of the house.”

If that’s case, all they need is a sturdy chair and a couple of full water bottles or cans of vegetables to get started.






Interest in pickleball rising across the country


Studies show that more Americans are playing pickleball than ever before.


Demand for the sport exploded from 2019 into 2020, with participation growing by 21%. That's a number that sports economist says is huge for any sport.

Those economists suspect that factors from the COVID-19 pandemic may have worked in the sport's favor.












Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines Less Effective Against Delta
In Elderly And Protection Wanes Rapidly Four Months
After Second Covid Shot

By Robert Hart
Read more  >>  https://www.forbes.com/sites/roberthart/2021/12/15/pfizer-moderna-vaccines-less-effective-against-delta-in-elderly-and-protection-wanes-rapidly-four-months-after-second-covid-shot-study-finds/?sh=5b5379ee399e
===================================================================
Social Security and Medicare:
What Benefits You Get, and Premiums You’ll Need To Pay

By Georgina Tzanetos
Read more  >>  https://www.yahoo.com/now/social-security-medicare-benefits-premiums-200117736.html
===================================================================
For the Elderly, the Holiday Season Often Brings Poor Tidings
The holidays can be the best time of year but for some, it may not be so joyful.

Read more  >>  https://www.washingtoninformer.com/for-the-elderly-the-holiday-season-often-brings-poor-tidings/
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What is the Future of Assisted Living in America?
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/assisted-living-facilities-future/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=c58088aed4-Tuesday_Newsletter_12_14_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-c58088aed4-165407981&mc_cid=c58088aed4&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===================================================================
How families can take the next steps when it comes
to moving loved ones into senior living environments

By Jacob Holley
Read more  >>  https://www.grandforksherald.com/how-families-can-take-the-next-steps-when-it-comes-to-moving-loved-ones-into-senior-living-environments
===================================================================
Art of Aging:
Geriatricians can help older adults
function better as they age

By Tamala Edwards
Read more  >>  https://6abc.com/geriatrician-art-of-aging-senior-citizens-getting-older/11348106/
===================================================================
A growing proportion of older adults
do not have a 'usual' clinician

Read more  >>  https://www.healio.com/news/primary-care/20211210/a-growing-proportion-of-older-adults-do-not-have-a-usual-clinician-survey-finds
===================================================================
Staffing remains top challenge
for senior living operators

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/staffing-remains-top-challenge-for-senior-living-operators-nic/
===================================================================
These Are the Most Expensive States for Senior Living
By Barbara Bellesi Zito
Read more  >>  https://www.fool.com/real-estate/2021/12/17/the-most-expensive-states-for-senior-living/
===================================================================
Tooth loss may signal increased
risk for diabetes in older adults

Read more  >>  https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211215/tooth-loss-may-signal-increased-risk-for-diabetes-in-older-adults
===================================================================
Retiring Boomers, not lazy Millennials,
are driving the labor shortage

By Allison Morrow
Read more  >>  https://www.komu.com/news/retiring-boomers-not-lazy-millennials-are-driving-the-labor-shortage/article_5dcf87e0-97bc-5b11-a613-ebe883ea6767.html
====================================================================
Older adults are getting the hang
of working from home

By Judy Schwank
Read more  >>  https://www.readingeagle.com/2021/12/12/older-adults-are-getting-the-hang-of-working-from-home-column/
====================================================================
New Dietary Guidance to Improve Cardiovascular Health
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/new-dietary-guidance-to-improve-cardiovascular-health/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=d9270444da-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_12_16_&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-d9270444da-165407981&mc_cid=d9270444da&mc_eid=94767a79b9
====================================================================
6 Worst Habits for Your Eye Health
By Kimberly Goad
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/bad-habits-for-eyes.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-121721-P1-6010329&ET_CID=6010329&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
====================================================================
Be compassionate when accompanying
older adults to medical appointments

By Carol Bradley Bursack
Read more  >>  https://www.inforum.com/newsmd/be-compassionate-when-accompanying-older-adults-to-medical-appointments
====================================================================
One Social Security rule is remaining the same in January –
and it could cost you thousands

By Joy Dumandan
Read more  >>  https://www.the-sun.com/money/4272200/social-security-rule-remaining-january-cost-you-thousands/
====================================================================
The holiday season is not so “jolly” for elders living alone;
don’t let them fall into depression

By John Grimaldi
Read more  >>  https://www.postandcourier.com/kingstree/news/the-holiday-season-is-not-so-jolly-for-elders-living-alone-don-t-let-them/article_bf5e7054-61b4-11ec-8182-5fb01fad2e93.html
====================================================================
Overweight older adults lose weight, keep it off by moving more
By Brian P. Dunleavy
Read more  >>  https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/12/21/older-adults-move-exercise-weight-loss-study/5291640026753/
====================================================================
10 Ways to Defy
 'Age Appropriate’ Dressing Standards

By Lois Joy Johnson
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/entertainment/style-trends/info-2021/defying-age-appropriate-fashion-beauty.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS---CTRL-122021-P3-6017013&ET_CID=6017013&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
====================================================================
From High school sweethearts to assisted living:
A story of love, commitment and dementia

By KAREN MAHONEY
Read more  >>  https://www.kenoshanews.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/from-high-school-sweethearts-to-assisted-living-a-story-of-love-commitment-and-dementia/article_277896ed-ecb1-5a25-831c-c65c0729a76d.html
====================================================================
Study: Moderna, Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines less effective
in seniors with chronic health woes

By Brian P. Dunleavy
Read more>>  https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/12/20/COVID-19-vaccines-effectiveness-older-adults-chronic-health-conditionsstudy/5401640029056/
====================================================================
Middle-aged Americans have more depression symptoms,
worse memory recall than older generations

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211216/Middle-aged-Americans-have-more-depression-symptoms-worse-memory-recall-than-older-generations.aspx
====================================================================
Social Security and food stamp SNAP benefits
will be available to Americans quicker

Read more  >>  https://outlook.live.com/mail/0/AQMkADAwATExAGI4Ny00YzQ0AC1kY2U2LTAwAi0wMAoALgAAA1Xbre1chDNCkVU2r9NiTCgBAHojtgrEzFFApy5KXpNnyVAAAYFo%2FXoAAAA%3D/id/AQQkADAwATExAGI4Ny00YzQ0AC1kY2U2LTAwAi0wMAoAEACIdCsO%2F%2B1qTbAdsUbLQBIG
====================================================================
AI can predict who will develop dementia
By Hannah Frishberg    
Read more  >>  https://nypost.com/2021/12/17/ai-can-now-predict-who-have-develop-dementia-study/
====================================================================
Technology More Integral Than Ever to Lives of People 50+
Read more  >>  https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/aarp-tech-trends-survey-technology-more-integral-than-ever-to-lives-of-people-50-301449081.html







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Good Day. It’s Thursday, December 23, 2021


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DECEMBER 23, 2021


Study: Moderna, Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines less effective
in seniors with chronic health woes

By Brian P. Dunleavy

The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines are less effective at protecting older, less healthy adults against infection than they are for younger, healthier recipients, a study published Monday by the Annals of Internal Medicine found.


However, they still prevent severe illness and death from the virus in the majority of older recipients, the data showed.


Seniors who were fully vaccinated with either of the two-dose shots had 69% protection against infection within seven days of their last inoculation, lower than the roughly 90% figure reported in earlier studies, the researchers said.



Middle-aged Americans have more depression symptoms,
worse memory recall than older generations

Reviewed by Emily Henderson,

Middle-aged adults in the United States today experience worse mental health than older generations of Americans, and also their European and Asian peers.


To understand what is happening with middle-aged American adults, a research team led by Arizona State University scientists compared middle age across different cultures and periods of time. The study examined how physical and mental health in midlife changed over time and in different countries. American adults currently in their 40s, 50s and early 60s have more symptoms of depression and worse memory recall than older Americans did when they were the same age. This pattern was found in Australian middle-aged adults but not in those living in Germany, South Korea or Mexico.

Years of education was associated with better mental health in midlife, but the strength of this buffering effect has waned for Americans currently in their 40s, 50s and 60s relative to older American generations and to middle-aged adults in Australia, Germany, South Korea and Mexico. This work was published on December 16 in American Psychologist.



Social Security and food stamp SNAP benefits
will be available to Americans quicker

Americans struggling and in need of benefits may see them even quicker under a new executive order signed by President Joe Biden.


The order makes the IRS return calls to Americans instead of forcing them to remain on hold.

It also creates a new tool for those seeking Social Security benefits to use online to slash waiting time.
Related: SNAP food stamps: Food stamp claimants told to use food banks due to benefit delays

A new portal will be created for Medicare recipients to help them save money on healthcare related costs.



AI can predict who will develop dementia
By Hannah Frishberg    

Artificial intelligence can reveal with incredible accuracy which individuals may develop dementia, new research has found.


AI has a 92% accuracy rating for predicting which memory clinic attendees will have dementia within two years, according to the study, published Thursday in the journal JAMA Network Open.

The findings are based on data from over 15,300 US patients. Authors say the algorithmic accuracy of AI predictions may be able to reduce the amount of false dementia diagnoses — and possibly help doctors intervene earlier.




Technology More Integral Than Ever to Lives of People 50+

According to a new AARP Tech Trends report, tech use by people 50+ skyrocketed during the pandemic and those new habits and behaviors appear here to stay.  What's more, most of those surveyed (70%) purchased tech last year, with spending far greater today than it was in 2019: $821 now versus in $394 then. Smartphones, and related accessories, along with Bluetooth headsets, topped the list of purchases, but smart home technology was vital to them, too. Unsurprisingly but importantly, technology use has facilitated social connectedness throughout the pandemic. The rates of reliance on tech for social connection is consistently high across age ranges: 76% of those in their 50s, 79% of those in their 60s, and 72% of people 70+ all count tech as their link to their families and the wider world.


"The pandemic redrew the lines: Tech has gone from a nice-to-have to a need-to-have for Americans 50+, and their new habits are here to stay," said Alison Bryant, AARP Senior Vice President of Research. "Those who can afford tech are spending a lot more than they did just a few years ago – more than twice what they spent in 2019. And their motivations vary: Some use tech to work, others to stay connected to family and friends, and others still to enable them to age in place or help them. At the same time, we're also mindful of the digital divide, where a lack of affordability can also mean no access to tech and its benefits."

AARP 2022 Tech Trends Report Key Findings:







In a Family, Estrangement Means Crisis
By Tracy K. Ross


The world of family estrangement can be complicated, best navigated with openness and empathy


Family estrangements, in the best of times, bring isolation and hopelessness. But as the family experiences a crisis — a death in the family, a parent becoming ill or cognitively impaired, a divorce — it brings confusion and often longing for a way to connect, and a glimmer of hope that past hurts can be put aside so families can rally around the problem.


As a family therapist, I routinely hear stories about "cutoffs." There is an event or a disagreement and family members stop talking. Sometimes the estrangement is unspoken, but the rift goes on for years. The shame involved in acknowledging family cutoffs hides the widespread nature of the phenomenon.








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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, December 22, 2021


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







Editor’s note…

The President needs to be stronger


I was going to write a post, bemoaning many Americans’ reluctance to get vaccinated. But President Biden beat me to it.
 
In an address to the nation Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Biden laid out his plan to combat the surge of the Omicron variant. You can read the highlights here [1]. But what amazes me the most is that a president of the most scientifically advanced, best educated and informed nation on the planet has to appear on national TV and beg people to get vaccinated or at least tested. It should be a no-brainer. We have a vaccine(s) that work. They cost nothing. At the very least, they will protect you from getting seriously ill and they are readily available. So what’s the problem? The president said it best when he called out cable news for disseminating false and inaccurate information about the virus. And, in an unprecedented reversal, he even went so far as to praise the former president for getting vaccinated[2] Unfortunately, even that won’t change the minds of nearly one third of our population to do the right thing.

 While I agree with the President on all fronts, I have to differ with him in one respect. Mr. Biden told us not to panic. While I understand his thinking, he is (perhaps unknowingly) taking a cue from Trump and playing down the seriousness of the situation for political reasons. I think we should panic. I think we should give thought to fining or incarcerating those who will not get vaccinated. Too harsh? Too Draconian? We’ve been in this mess for nearly three years. It’s time we recognize the urgency and do what a government is supposed to do…………………………..
 
[1]Read more here> https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/12/21/fact-sheet-president-biden-announces-new-actions-to-protect-americans-and-help-communities-and-hospitals-battle-omicron/

[2]  “I got my booster shot as soon as they were available, and just the other day, former President Trump announced that he had gotten his booster shot,” the Democrat added of the former Celebrity Apprentice host, throwing out praise to the “previous administration” for getting vaccines to Americans






DECEMBER 22, 2021


One Social Security rule is remaining the same in January –
and it could cost you thousands

By Joy Dumandan

SENIOR citizens are looking forward to more money from Social Security in 2022, but it may not add up to more in their bank accounts.


The cost of living adjustment (COLA) means benefits will increase by 5.9% in the new year.
Senior citizens will have a larger Social Security check in 2022, but there are other expenses to consider

The Social Security Administration (SSA) makes adjustments to keep pace with inflation and wage growth but there is no adjustment to the rules regarding how much income you can have before Social Security benefits become taxable.

If you are a single tax filer with a provisional income above $25,000 or a married joint filer with a provisional income above $32,000, you could be taxed on part of your benefits.



The holiday season is not so “jolly” for elders living alone;
don’t let them fall into depression

By John Grimaldi

Too many senior citizens come down with a case of Holiday Blues this time of the year. It’s not a very “jolly” season – especially if you’re old and living alone. The National Council on Aging [NCOA] estimates that 28% or more of folks in the 65-plus segment of the population live alone and while it can be tough on them each and every day, the holiday season is an especially rough reminder of their solitary lives.


NCOA says that “Loneliness is more than an emotional issue; it has real implications for physical and mental health. Recent research has shown that feeling lonely or being isolated affects mortality in a similar way to that of a smoking habit of 15 cigarettes per day and has more of an impact on mortality than other risk factors, like obesity and sedentary lifestyle.”

According to Rebecca Weber, CEO of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], it doesn’t have to be that way if caring relatives and neighbors take the time and make the effort to show them that you care. “Schedule visits or just pop in unexpected, pick up the phone, include them in your holiday celebrations and you’ll give them the gift of hope and a measure of happiness. They’ll feel better and so will you.”




Overweight older adults lose weight, keep it off by moving more
By Brian P. Dunleavy

Moving more throughout the day offers enhanced weight-loss benefits for older, severely overweight adults, even without structured exercise activities, a study published Tuesday by the journal Obesity found.



Participants in a regimen called SitLess, which asked them to move around more frequently throughout the day to achieve daily step counts, lost weight and kept the pounds off more effectively than those in more structured programs, the data showed.

They also were more likely to remain engaged in the program than those who participated in structured aerobic exercise and weight-loss treatments, the researchers said.




10 Ways to Defy
 'Age Appropriate’ Dressing Standards

By Lois Joy Johnson

How we look says a lot about our attitude toward aging. Just like cars, TV sets, dating, frozen foods, vacuum cleaners, coffee and cellphones, we need updates, too. That means avoiding predictable clothing, hair and makeup ruts that make us appear stuck in a time warp. Sure, we’ve changed. We have grayer hair and a few more wrinkles but that doesn’t keep us from wearing leggings, leather and leopard, nor should it. Here are 10 ways to defy aging stereotypes and look cooler at 50 than you ever did at 25:


1. Keep wearing a black leather jacket

Wearing black is one of our favorite things to do. It makes us feel cutting-edge contemporary, slim and sleek. However, adding a black leather jacket to any outfit says you’re sort of edgy, possibly a little rebellious and definitely have a gutsy approach to life. Everyone needs a black leather jacket, but which one? Choose a biker style heavy on the zips and studs for a sassy streetwise attitude, a sleek bomber for minimalist polish and a buttery blazer with notched lapels (harder to find but worth it when you do) for a downtown twist on a classic. Wear them with everything, day or night.




From High school sweethearts to assisted living:
A story of love, commitment and dementia

By KAREN MAHONEY

After calling 911 for at least the 30th time, the sheriff told Jack they could not continue looking for his wife each time she got lost. He should think about putting her in an assisted living home.


“That was hard to hear,” said Jack, who has been married to Colleen for 54 years. “But after she slapped and kicked me, I called 911 for the last time. I had to file charges for domestic abuse. They took her to the emergency room at St. Catherine’s Hospital. It was hard to do, but that opened the door to get her into assisted living.”

It wasn’t always like this, and Jack frequently reflects on their early years together.

The couple’s romance began when they exchanged glances in high school study hall. They looked forward to the seventh period each day, sometimes passing notes to one another until Jack got the courage to ask Colleen for a date. They were inseparable after that.





Last chance to see the Rolling Stones —
a dispatch from the alte-kocker-rocker circuit

By Steven Wishnia

The cold orange dawn on Nov. 20 found me and my old poet friend Lee crammed into the back row of a plane from New York to Austin, Texas, bound for the Rolling Stones’ show that night. It would be the first time I’d ever seen them, 56 years after the fuzz-guitar riff of “Satisfaction” grabbed me, blaring out of the radio the summer I was 10.


The closest I’d ever come was their November 1969 show at Madison Square Garden. It was sold out, but that afternoon, I was coming out of a record store when an older guy stopped me — he couldn’t go, so he was selling his ticket at cost. But I’d just spent what I had buying “Let It Bleed.” Other times, either their shows sold out immediately, they didn’t play New York, or I didn’t feel like spending $100 to sit in the oxygen-tank levels of a football stadium.

As their 2021 tour arrived, however, I felt this could be the last time, especially after drummer Charlie Watts died in August. Also, my son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter live in Austin. But I didn’t have anyone to go with, and the venue, an auto-racing track, was miles beyond the city’s outermost bus stop.









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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, December 21, 2021

THE FIRST DAY OF WINTER


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com







The new Variant Is Making Me Nervous.

The headlines are not encouraging. They are, in fact, downright scary. This new variant of the COVID virus, OMICRON, is running rampant throughout most of the nation. Where I live, me and my fellow residents, here at the A.L.F., are right smack in the middle of what has become OMICRON central. New York has set a record for daily fresh cases. Even our recently appointed Health Commissioner, Mary T. Basset, MD, has contracted the virus, though she has received all three vaccine shots. It appears there may be no escape. This is of special concern for those of us who are already targeted as the most vulnerable and, therefore, the first to have the most stringent anti-infection controls foisted upon them. Including putting us into another quarantine/lockdown situation, which will do little more than raise the anxiety levels of an already very anxious population of old folks.

As of now, I know of no resident or staff that has tested positive for the virus. We have visitors (loved ones, vendors, delivery people) here daily with no actual way of knowing who is carrying the virus. However, if history is any sign of what is coming, it is not if, but when it will hit us.




DECEMBER 21, 2021



Retiring Boomers, not lazy Millennials,
are driving the labor shortage

By Allison Morrow

One of the more insidious myths making the rounds this year was that young people didn't want to work because they were getting by just fine on government aid. People had too much money, went the narrative from a handful of politicians and pundits.



Only trouble is, the numbers don't back it up.

Here's the thing: Early retirement — whether forced by the pandemic or made possible otherwise — is having a huge impact on the labor market. And data show that retiring boomers, far more than "lazy" millennials, are the biggest force behind the labor shortage.




Older adults are getting the hang
of working from home

By Judy Schwank

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in numerous ways, but perhaps its most lasting change to society will be the way people work.


Seemingly overnight, millions of workers in the public, private and non-profit sectors found themselves saying goodbye to the office and working from home. According to The Economist, only 5% of Americans worked from home before the pandemic. That number swelled to 60% in the spring of 2020.

Remarkably, such a massive shift was handled well as industries across the spectrum moved quickly and utilized modern technology to their advantage. The same Economist report that measured the sharp shift toward remote work found that Americans working from home reported longer hours and higher levels of happiness and productivity.



New Dietary Guidance to Improve Cardiovascular Health

The American Heart Association has issued guidelines to help Americans stay heart healthy



My holiday wish list includes a magic wand to make those extra eggnog-and-fruitcake-pounds melt off my body as quickly as a snowman in a heat wave turns into a puddle of water. And once the holidays are over, I will head to the supermarket with good intentions, hoping my New Year's resolutions to eat well and exercise will help me to become a little less hefty!


The good news is there is new information about how I can go about this and still enjoy the things I love.




6 Worst Habits for Your Eye Health
By Kimberly Goad

The importance of an annual eye exam cannot be understated. Not only do they help you keep tabs on any changes in your vision, but they’re a must for detecting the big vision thieves: glaucoma, cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), all of which can cause irreparable harm before you’ve even noticed any vision loss, says Michelle Andreoli, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Northwestern Medicine and spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


What might not be so obvious when it comes to eye health, however, are the everyday habits that affect them. Here are six of the worst habits for your eyes — and what you can do to break each of them.

Bad Habit 1: Smoking

Add this to the always-growing list of reasons to give up smoking for good: Cigarette smoke is more than just irritating to your eyes; research shows it also raises your risk of developing AMD, the eye disease that can blur your central vision. People over age 55 are already at risk for the condition, but an Australian study published in JAMA Ophthalmology found that smokers have a nearly four-fold higher risk of late AMD than people who’ve never smoked. What’s more, the smokers in the study developed the condition five years earlier, on average, than the never-smokers. ​​“Smoking reduces the effectiveness of antioxidants and may deplete these levels in the macula,” the small area at the center of the retina that’s necessary to see things in front of you, explains Ashley Brissette, M.D., an ophthalmologist and assistant professor of ophthalmology at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. “Cigarette smoke also reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the tiny blood vessels that supply the eye, leading to vision damage.”




Be compassionate when accompanying
older adults to medical appointments

By Carol Bradley Bursack

Dear Carol: My mom’s 83 and is being treated for the usual issues like high cholesterol and blood pressure. I’ve been accompanying her to the doctor for several years and that’s worked well, but now she seems to be hedging when answering the doctor’s questions. I see her memory slipping just a bit which she denies, so I try to signal to the doctor that Mom may not be answering truthfully. This makes her angry. The doctor needs accurate information, but how do I do this without making Mom so upset that she will no longer accept my help? — GY.



Dear GY: You’re in a tough place. As you noted, if older adults don’t cooperate by being truthful when talking to doctors, they may not receive the best possible care. I’ve been there myself, and it’s frustrating because we just want what’s best.

Some things to consider that might help improve the next appointment:








In This New Book, Women Share
Their Collective Wisdom About Aging



Insightful questions evoke inspiring truths about aging in ‘Collective Wisdom: Lessons, Inspiration and Advice from Women over 50’



Hungry for meaningful conversations, exchanges that surpass pleasantries and affirm the value of women's lives?

Grace Bonney's new book "Collective Wisdom: Lessons, Inspiration, and Advice from Women over 50" provides a forum for more than 100 women, individually and in intergenerational groups, who speak honestly about their lives — and can teach us about our own.















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Good Day. It’s Monday, December 20, 2021



Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com








Most folks don’t give the prospects of losing one’s mind much thought. And neither would I if I didn’t have a front-row seat at one of senility’s major-league venues. The A.L.F.
 
Assisted living facilities are a “bridge” between home care and nursing homes. Many, like the one at which I am a resident, are not “enhanced.” Simply, that means they don’t have memory care units. However, they permit people with minor cognitive difficulties to live here. What determines “mild” is not clear and, as I have observed, varies in interpretation.

Many of us who are in our “Golden Years’’ routinely forget things. Names, dates or where we left our glasses are prime among them. These low-grade absences of thought are at the bottom end on the cognition scale. In between come the more advanced forms of memory impairment, which may include forgetting doctor’s appointments or what time meals are served. These are relatively minor lapses and are easily remedied by sending an aid to the residents’ room as a “reminder.” It’s not until more severe forms of dementia manifest that makes one wonder “what the heck are these people doing here?”



On more than a few occasions, I have had residents (some who have been here for many months) ask me where their room is or which elevator button to press to get to the first floor. And some are worse. And by “worse” I mean they become belligerent, often threatening harm to themselves or others. Most recently, we have had a resident emerge from the men’s room with his pants down while another had no reservation relieving themselves in the lobby. Is this a prelude of things to come?

Sunday morning and I awake with the usual cobwebs clogging my head. For the first seconds of “life” I’m confused. “Where am I ?” “What time is it?” What day is it?” “Did I miss breakfast?” Questions only a mentally impaired person would ask, right? Fortunately, the fog of the “morning-mini-stroke”, as I call it, clears, and I can provide answers to those vital questions and begin my daily routine. My ganglia, synapses and neurons have made their connections and are firing away as they have done for over 75 years. But for how much longer? If heredity has anything to do with it, I’m in good shape.
 
Both my parents had most of their mental faculties intact well into their 80s. Will it be the same for me? I hope so. The one thing that frightens me about getting old more than contracting a fatal illness is losing my mind.

Not being able to understand what’s going on around me or functioning in this high-tech environment makes me think about who and what I am. This is one reason I do this blog. It makes me think. The other is a means of self-testing. I figure if I can write a coherent sentence and then post it to the internet via an often quirky web hosting service, mentally, at least, I know  I’m okay. I know how fortunate I am to have the ability to think clearly and, more important, to know when I need help. May g-d help me if that ever changes.…………………..





DECEMBER 20, 2021




Art of Aging:
Geriatricians can help older adults
function better as they age

By Tamala Edwards

As people age, they often need more medical care and they often need specialists. However, there's one specialist that not enough senior citizens see - a geriatrician.



Just as pediatricians are experts on kids, geriatricians are experts on the health needs of older adults.

The American Geriatrics Society estimates nearly a third of people over age 65 need one.




A growing proportion of older adults
do not have a 'usual' clinician


Fewer adults with multimorbidity had a “usual” clinician from whom they regularly sought care in 2016 compared with 2010, according to survey results published in JAMA Network Open.


Moreover, the data showed that adults whose usual clinician was a specialist instead of a primary care clinician were 5.6 percentage points less likely to receive the influenza vaccine.
Proportion of older adults with a usual clinician decreased from 2010 to 2016.


“Our results suggest the importance of providing usual care — ideally primary care — for older adults with multimorbidity,” Ishani Ganguli, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues wrote. “In addition to the preventive health benefits ... specialist usual clinicians had primary focus in just 24% to 25% of their patients’ chronic conditions, suggesting potential gaps in care that were not captured by the outcomes we examined.”




Staffing remains top challenge
for senior living operators


Staffing shortages continue to plague senior living and other long-term care operators, with attracting community and caregiving staff remaining a “significant challenge,” along with increasing turnover, according to the latest NIC Executive Survey Insights report.



Since September, the number of senior living (independent and assisted living) and skilled nursing operators reporting staffing shortages has been approximately 100%. Almost half of participating organizations with multiple properties (45%) reported shortages at all of their sites, up from 30% in mid-March.

Since August, more than four out of five respondents cited attracting community and caregiving staff members as their biggest challenge, with turnover increasing to 70% from 53% since mid-June.




These Are the Most Expensive States for Senior Living
By Barbara Bellesi Zito

Assisted living communities are places where people can lead full lives while also getting help with daily tasks like meal preparation, housekeeping, medication management, and more. Residents of these communities and facilities often find companionship and a sense of belonging. It's a solid option for many older Americans, but none of it comes cheap.


According to a recent report by Seniorly, an online platform that connects people with senior living options and resources, the average rent for assisted living communities across the country is $4,057 per month.  New Jersey is the priciest, at $5,893 per month, while Georgia is the least expensive, at $3,000 a month.


Based on a typical salary and rate of saving, it would take the average person 9.5 years to save up for just one year of assisted living. It's no wonder so many people are either pushing retirement off or looking for other options to live out their golden years -- including staying put in their own homes.




Tooth loss may signal increased
risk for diabetes in older adults


Older adults may have an increased risk for developing diabetes and experiencing adverse diabetes-related outcomes if they lose teeth, according to a systematic review published in BMC Endocrine Disorders.


“All studies included in this review, except one, consistently demonstrated a significant association between tooth loss and diabetes-related outcomes in older adults,” Susan Hyde, DDS, MPH, PhD, professor in the department preventive and restorative sciences, division of oral epidemiology and dental public health at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Dentistry, and colleagues wrote. “This review’s finding that retained teeth is inversely correlated with HbA1c in older adults with diabetes is consistent with previous studies reporting people with high HbA1c have poorer periodontal health and fewer teeth than those without diabetes. This review also bolstered the findings of studies conducted to explore the relationship between tooth loss and metabolic syndrome.”







Quality time, assistive tech, good food:
what older adults actually want for the holidays



You can still get the perfect gift at a great price in time for the holidays—here's how.

For many people, gifts for the older adults in their lives can often be an afterthought. As people age, they tend to just buy the things they want instead of waiting for gifts from others, making holiday shopping for older relatives and friends a bit more difficult.


Classics like No. 1 grandparent mugs are cute the first time but not the third or fourth, and clothes tend vanish in dressers.


Nearly a quarter of New Jersey residents are over the age of 60, however, according to NJ Advocates for Aging Well, a nonprofit that focuses on public policy advocacy and education to enable older adults to live independently and with dignity.











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Good Day. It’s Sunday, December 19, 2021


Email > theseniorlog@protonmail.com









With a free phone, you get what you pay for


The other day I blogged about the free smartphone and service I received from Assurance Wireless. I told you, with a free phone, you get what you pay for. A lousy phone and even worse service. Therefore, I went a different route and decided to actually pay for phone service. After some research, I discovered a smartphone that fit my needs.
 
The phone and service is provided by a company called “Lively” (formally Jitterbug) and it has all you could want in a phone. But best of all, it comes with a provider that won’t break your budget. For a mere $20 a month (all taxes and fees included) I get 300 minutes of service. More than I will ever use. Best of all, I can receive text messages and check my email and go online if I want to.
 
The phone itself is a standard smartphone with an easy-to-read interface. Everything is clearly marked and large enough for old eyes to see. Even the “keyboard” has larger digits.
 
Among the things I liked immediately, it came with a charged battery. This allowed me to access the quick use guide, which popped up when I turned on the phone and guided me through the set-up procedure. Five minutes later and I was up and running (my phone, that is).


Just let me make this clear. I’m not saying my experience with Assurance will be the same as yours might be. But you should know that along with the free service come certain limitations. In addition, let me assure you I, in no way, have any connection to “Lively” nor am I getting any compensation for mentioning them. I suggest you do as I did. Research the different plans and phones.
 
By offering total disclosure, I must mention there was one problem with “Lively”. I did not know what my new phone number was or where I could find it. Efforts to find the info online were futile and the email I sent to customer service, so far, has gone unanswered. However, there is more than one way to skin a cat (sorry animal lovers). I dialed my friend and had her read my new number off her screen. No. I’m not telling you what it is. I have enough extended warranties thank you…………






DECEMBER 19, 2021



Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines Less Effective Against Delta
In Elderly And Protection Wanes Rapidly Four Months
After Second Covid Shot

By Robert Hart

Pfizer and Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccines are much less effective at preventing infection of senior citizens with the delta coronavirus variant and protection fades rapidly four months after the final jab, new research published in JAMA Network Open has found, as experts race to understand how effective the shots are against the fast-spreading, potentially vaccine-resistant omicron variant.



Before the delta variant, the mRNA vaccines were 95% effective at preventing coronavirus infection in the first month after the final shot, falling to 88% by the third month, according to an analysis of health records from over 14,000 Covid-positive male veterans over the age of 65.


Through July to September, a period of high delta transmission in the U.S., protection against infection had fallen to 62% in the first month after the second shot and 58% by the third month, a similar pattern from the pre-delta period.




Social Security and Medicare:
What Benefits You Get, and Premiums You’ll Need To Pay

By Georgina Tzanetos

Medicare is our country’s health insurance program, and is available to those who are aged 65 and older. The program is at least partially implemented in the hopes of reducing medical debt among low-income or disadvantaged persons.


See: Appealing to Social Security Administration Can Reduce Your Medicare Payments if You’ve Lost Income
Find: Medicare, Medicaid and What You Can Actually Qualify For.

It is connected with Social Security in that Social Security enrolls you in Medicare Part A and Part B automatically when you apply for Social Security benefits — or when you turn 65.




For the Elderly, the Holiday Season Often Brings Poor Tidings
The holidays can be the best time of year but for some, it may not be so joyful.


And the COVID-19 pandemic has made matters worse for those who often feel alone during the holidays.


“COVID-19 has really had an impact on our older adult population especially those who were already socially isolated. Now, because of the virus, many are avoiding any contact with others because they’re more susceptible to COVID-19. To protect themselves, they know they have to be isolated from others,” said Josi Makon, Older Adult Behavioral Health Coordinator for Montgomery County Health and Human Services.

Makon said the pandemic serves as one of the leading causes of social isolation among seniors. Other sources contributing to social isolation include place of residence, limited transportation, limited finances and an inadequate network of social support.




What is the Future of Assisted Living in America?

Assisted living facilities were hit hard by the pandemic. Here's what the future holds.

Nursing homes have received a lot of attention over the pandemic due to the many deaths there from COVID-19. Less discussed, however, are assisted living facilities — the other primary form of long-term care in the United States.


Assisted living facilities are generally for older adults who need some assistance with daily living, but don't require the level of care that nursing homes offer. They tend to have less regulation than nursing homes and the rules governing them vary widely by state. Unlike nursing homes, there are no national, federally-mandated standards for assisted living.





How families can take the next steps when it comes
to moving loved ones into senior living environments

By Jacob Holley

Families have tough decisions to make in the days leading up to a loved one entering a senior living facility.

Julie Vatnsdal, the housing coordinator at Valley Senior Living, and Cheryl Ekren, its housing manager, spoke to the Herald about the first steps people take when considering or moving forward with the process of moving a loved one into a senior living facility.


However, there are different levels of care that can be provided to those in assisted living facilities. So, what are the first steps for families to decide what kind of care their loved ones need?


“Typically with us, the families come over and bring their loved one in for a screening with our nurse,” Vatnsdal said. “That’s usually just a meeting that basically tells them yes, they would be fine at this level of care, or no, that they refer them on to a skilled care, memory care or whatever the next level of care that they need. It is a screening with the nurse at that level.”






The Best Road Trip in Each State



A great road trip is hard to beat. Exploring by car allows you to immerse yourself in the journey rather than hurrying to get to a specific destination. Road trips in the United States are so popular that an estimated 50 million Americans embarked on one in 2019, according to a AAA Travel survey. From cityscapes to untouched wilderness, you can see it all in the country with boundless diverse landscapes. Which destination is right for you? Take a look at the best road trip in each state for some travel inspiration.

FIND YOURS HERE >  https://www.thediscoverer.com/blog/best-road-trip-in-each-state/XvHyVpKgiwAG5awQ?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter






National Poll Shows Voters Want Biden Administration,
Congress to Deliver COVID-19 Relief to Assisted Living

Read more  >>  https://www.argentum.org/press-releases/national-poll-shows-voters-want-biden-administration-congress-to-deliver-covid-19-relief-to-assisted-living/
=====================================================
Blood pressure climbed during coronavirus
pandemic, especially among women
By Jacqueline Howard
Read more  >>  https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/06/health/blood-pressure-increase-pandemic-wellness/index.html
=====================================================
Clinical study shows therapeutic sleep training
for older adults can prevent depression

Read more  >>  https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/11/29/sleep-training-adults-prevents-depression-study/8791931002/
=====================================================
Millions of workers retired during the pandemic.
The economy needs them to "unretire," experts say.

By Sarah Sarah
Read more  >>  https://www.cbsnews.com/news/retirement-covid-pandemic-unretire-labor-shortage/
=====================================================
Manchin Seniors takes teeth
from the plan for dental care

By Phil Galwitz
Read more  >>  https://printveela.com/manchin-seniors-takes-teeth-from-the-plan-for-dental-care/
=====================================================
How to Deal With Ageism From Doctors and Nurses
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/ageism-from-doctors-and-nurses/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7f908ee929-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_18_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-7f908ee929-165407981&mc_cid=7f908ee929&mc_eid=94767a79b9
=====================================================
Improving mobility and quality of life for older adults
Read more  >>  https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-12-mobility-quality-life-older-adults.html
=====================================================
Getting Enough Fluids
Read more  >>  https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/getting-enough-fluids
=====================================================
1 in 5 Americans are saving less
for retirement due to Covid

By Jessica Dickler
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/09/1-in-5-americans-are-saving-less-for-retirement-due-to-covid.html
=====================================================
7 Must-Do’s if You’re Retired and Broke
By Jordan Bishop
Read more  >>  https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/401862
=====================================================
Viagra may be useful against Alzheimer's dementia
Read more  >>  https://www.bbc.com/news/health-59546948
=====================================================
This 68-year-old retiree lives on
$620 per month in Mexico

By Glen Rogers
Read more  >>  https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/11/this-68-year-old-retiree-lives-on-620-per-month-in-mexico-take-a-look-inside-her-160000-home.html
=====================================================
Skin Care and Aging
Read more  >>  https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/skin-care-and-aging
=====================================================
5 Reasons Older Adults Aren't Getting Hired
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/5-reasons-older-adults-arent-getting-hired/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7f908ee929-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_18_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-7f908ee929-165407981&mc_cid=7f908ee929&mc_eid=94767a79b9
=====================================================
Medicare urged to flex its power and slash back premium hike
BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Read more >>  https://www.kimt.com/news/politics/medicare-urged-to-flex-its-power-and-slash-back-premium-hike/article_e48f96e7-e986-5e17-bf63-184683713531.html
=====================================================
New FDA Approved Eye Drops Actually
Eliminate the Need for Reading Glasses

By Loukia Papadopoulos
Read more  >>  https://interestingengineering.com/fda-approved-eye-drops-eliminate-the-need-for-reading-glasses?utm_source=join1440&utm_medium=email&utm_placement=newsletter
=====================================================
US Reps Introduce Bill to Ensure Permanent Access to Telehealth
Read more  >>  https://mhealthintelligence.com/news/us-reps-introduce-bill-to-ensure-permanent-access-to-telehealth
=====================================================
Telehealth May Be Here to Stay
By: Michael Ollove
Read more  >>  https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2021/12/01/telehealth-may-be-here-to-stay
=====================================================
Urinary incontinence could contribute to
increased risk of falls in older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211207/Urinary-incontinence-could-contribute-to-increased-risk-of-falls-in-older-adults.aspx
=====================================================
10 Secrets of a Happy Retirement
By Bruce Horovitz
=====================================================
What You Need to Know About Conductive Hearing Loss
By Kimberly Goad
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2021/conductive-hearing-loss.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-RSS-HEARING--CTRL-121421-P7-6002900&ET_CID=6002900&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
=====================================================
Older adults with moderate alcohol consumption
may have decreased risk of heart disease

By Amy McGorry
Read more  >>  https://www.foxnews.com/health/older-adults-moderate-alcohol-consumption-decreased-risk-heart
=====================================================
10 Second Career Ideas for Retirees
By: Dave Roos
Read more  >>  https://money.howstuffworks.com/second-career-ideas/10-second-career-ideas-for-retirees.htm









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Good Day. It’s Thursday, December 16, 2021



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DECEMBER 16, 2021


10 Secrets of a Happy Retirement
By Bruce Horovitz

Just about everyone who is still slaving away at the office shares the very same goal as those of us who have long since left the workplace: a happy retirement.

Ah, but how to get there?

A happy retirement means many things to many different people. Even then, there are 10 habits that can certainly help to make retirement more gratifying. AARP reached out to three experts who all have written important books on retirement. Here are their 10 top tips for a truly happy retirement.



1. Be a saver, not a spender.

It’s much easier to spend money than to save it, but the gratification you’ll enjoy in retirement by having enough of it is a strong argument to save plenty through your working years. The key is starting to save as early as possible, with a goal of having at least $500,000 saved at the time of retirement, says Wes Moss, chief investment strategist at Capital Investment Advisors in Atlanta, Georgia, and author of What the Happiest Retirees Know: 10 Habits for a Healthy, Secure and Joyful Life. Of course, not everyone can save that much, but it’s a good goal, he says. It’s also a good idea to have your mortgage paid off or almost paid off, and Moss says that those who are within five years of repayment are four times more likely to be happy. It’s also best if the retirement money comes from a mix of sources, such as Social Security, pension, rental income, investment income and perhaps part-time work.



What You Need to Know About Conductive Hearing Loss
By Kimberly Goad

If you find that you’ve been cranking up the volume of your TV recently in order to hear it, you may think that you have age-related hearing loss and that there’s not much you can do about it. But consider this: Your hearing loss may be temporary.


It’s true that in most cases, it’s not. Around 90 percent of hearing impairment in people over 50 is classified by experts as sensorineural hearing loss, typically a permanent condition that occurs when there’s a problem with the inner ear or auditory nerve. But that leaves a minority of people who have what’s known as conductive hearing loss, which is usually temporary and treatable.


“There isn’t a clear-cut way to distinguish hearing loss as either sensorineural or conductive without a full diagnostic hearing evaluation,” says audiologist Bria Collins, associate director of audiology professional practices at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). “Listeners with conductive hearing loss (CHL) predominantly will experience a loss in the volume of sound, whereas those with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) will more likely have both a loss of sound volume and speech clarity.”




Older adults with moderate alcohol consumption
may have decreased risk of heart disease

By Amy McGorry

Older adults who drink moderate amounts of alcohol may have a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of mortality from all causes, compared to those who do not drink, according to a study published last month in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.


The study looked at more than 18,000 individuals over the age of 70 from the United States and Australia.


"Modest alcohol intake in this group of healthy older adults was not harmful for CVD or overall mortality," Dr. Johannes Neumann, who led the team of researchers from Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, in Australia, said in a release. The lead author of the study also said, "Further research is warranted to evaluate causal biological effects of alcohol on health and possible behavioral advantages of social drinking and engagement," according to the release.




10 Second Career Ideas for Retirees
By: Dave Roos

Call it a "second act" or an "encore" career, but the fact is that millions of retirees are veering from the expected retirement routine -- golf, garden, rinse and repeat -- and launching a second career in their 60s, 70s and even 80s. A whopping 74 percent of workers plan to get a new job after they retire, according to the annual retirement expectations survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.


Post-retirement workers fall into two general camps: those who can't afford to retire on their current savings and Social Security benefits; and those with a comfortable nest egg who simply want to stay active, stay engaged, pursue a long-deferred dream or give back to the community.


Regardless of age, it's a tricky time to change careers. As more and more Baby Boomers reach retirement age, the economy is still struggling to regain its footing. The job market is tight for the kind of work that brings in the six-figure salaries to which some retiring executives are accustomed. But there are still plenty of intriguing job sectors out there for retirees who want to put their hard-won expertise to work or try something completely different.






Which gift for every type of grandma is best?

Grandparents can provide insight into our heritage and culture. They also can play vital roles in the lives of our families, whether they live close or far away. Because they are so important, only the best will do for Grandma. Whether your grandmother loves to cook, read, craft or spend time outside, there’s a gift sure to put a smile on her face. If you are not sure what Grandma really likes, you can’t go wrong with our most versatile choice, the Pix-Star 10-Inch Wi-Fi Cloud Digital Picture Frame.  


For the literary grandma

If Grandma loves to read, an e-book reader is the perfect gift. With one, she can download reading material including books, newspapers and magazines. Once you get her the e-book reader, you can present her with gift cards in the future.

Read more  >>  https://kdvr.com/reviews/best-gift-for-every-type-of-grandma/










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NEXT NEW BLOG FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17. 2021





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Good Day. It’s Wednesday, December 15, 2021


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COVID has killed 1 of every 100 older
Americans as U.S. nears grim milestone [1]


“As the coronavirus pandemic approaches the end of a second year, the United States stands on the cusp of surpassing 800,000 deaths from the virus, and no group has suffered more than older Americans. All along, older people have been known to be more vulnerable, but the scale of loss is only now coming into full view.

Seventy-five percent of people who have died of the virus in the United States — or about 600,000 of the nearly 800,000 who have perished so far — have been 65 or older. One in 100 older Americans has died from the virus. For people younger than 65, that ratio is closer to 1 in 1,400.


The heightened risk for older people has dominated life for many, partly as friends and family try to protect them. “You get kind of forgotten,’’ said Pat Hayashi, 65, of San Francisco. “In the pandemic, the isolation and the loneliness got worse. We lost our freedom and we lost our services.”

Since vaccines first became available a year ago, older Americans have been vaccinated at a much higher rate than younger age groups and yet the brutal toll on them has persisted. The share of younger people among all virus deaths in the United States increased this year, but, in the past two months, the portion of older people has risen once again, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 1,200 people in the United States are dying from COVID-19 each day, most of them 65 or older.


I wanted you to read the above excerpt first. From the very beginning of this Pandemic (now over two years old) America’s older citizens have been, not only at the forefront of those most affected by the disease, but the group most poorly treated by those who think they know what’s best for us. Sadly, they haven’t a clue.

If you think you have not been treated fairly these past months, think about this. “No person, old or young, who is not a resident of a long-term care facility can fully appreciate the horror show this pandemic has become for us.”
 
The restrictions foisted on nursing home and assisted living residents far exceeded any placed on the general public. And now, when it appears a new strain of the virus has taken over, some of those Draconian protocols which were so cavalierly approved for us are being mandated for the rest of the nation. And guess what? The rest of America doesn’t like it. Evidently, with COVID, what is good for the goose is not good for the gander.

Mainstream Americans complain that with the newly proposed restrictions, their “freedoms” are in peril. “The government, they argue, has no business in how we choose or not to choose, to limit our activities. I’m not here to argue the point. To do so would be futile. But let me say this. “Why is it okay to lock-down, restrict activities and isolate A.L.F. residents in such a manner to make one think we are not citizens of this nation?’’

I’ll leave you to think about that while you are waiting online at the express checkout and are listening to people complaining about having to wear a face mask……………….

[1]   source:  -https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/as-u-s-nears-800000-virus-deaths-1-of-every-100-older-americans-has-perished/







DECEMBER 15, 2021


Medicare urged to flex its power and
slash back premium hike
BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

The head of a Senate panel that oversees Medicare says the Biden administration should use its legal authority to cut back a hefty premium increase soon hitting millions of enrollees, as a growing number of Democratic lawmakers call for action amid worries over rising inflation.



Last month, Medicare announced one of the largest increases ever in its “Part B” monthly premium for outpatient care, nearly $22, from $148.50 currently to $170.10 starting in January.

The agency attributed roughly half the hike, about $11 a month, to the need for a contingency fund to cover Aduhelm, a new $56,000 Alzheimer's drug from Biogen whose benefits have been widely questioned. For most Medicare enrollees, the premium is deducted from their Social Security checks. Without further action, it would swallow up a significant chunk of seniors' 5.9% cost of living increase.




New FDA Approved Eye Drops Actually
Eliminate the Need for Reading Glasses

By Loukia Papadopoulos

Say goodbye to reading glasses, at least if you are under 65. A new eye drop called Vuity which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October could change the lives of millions of Americans with age-related blurred near vision, CBS News reports.


The condition affects about 128 million citizens mostly over 40 and the eye drops work well for people aged below 65. Vuity takes effect in about 15 minutes and lasts for 6 to 10 hours.

The drops make use of the eye’s inherent ability to reduce its pupil size.






US Reps Introduce Bill to Ensure Permanent Access to Telehealth

Members of the House Ways and Means Health Subcommittee have introduced a bipartisan bill that seeks to ensure permanent access to telehealth services.



U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX), who is the chair of the subcommittee, and subcommittee members Devin Nunes (R-CA), Mike Thompson (D-CA), Mike Kelly (R-PA), and David Schweikert (R-AZ) are sponsoring the Telehealth Extension Act.

The bill has been endorsed by several notable telehealth advocates including the National Rural Health Association, the eHealth Initiative, the American Nurses Association, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.



Urinary incontinence could contribute to
increased risk of falls in older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

A team of University of Alberta researchers focused on aging Albertans has found that urinary incontinence could be a contributing factor in falls among older adults.


In a study published in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers showed for the first time that the feeling of having to pee acts as a distracting factor that increases the risk of falling.

Falls are the leading cause of accidental death in seniors, and many people don't know that having bladder control problems makes you about twice as likely to fall over.



Travelers, Rejoice! Soon You Can
Renew Your Passport Online

By Suzanne Rowan Kelleher


First, the bad news. Right now, the turnaround time for a standard passport renewal currently can take up to 11 weeks, according to the State Department website. For $60 more, an expedited renewal application can take up to seven weeks. Passport renewals are moving a lot faster now than last summer, when travelers were waiting up to 18 weeks to renew their passports. But it still takes much longer than it did before the pandemic, when six to eight weeks for standard service was the norm and, if you ponied up for the expedited service, you might get your little blue book in as little as two weeks.


The good news? Within the coming months, passport turnaround time should soon become much, much quicker.

Today in the Oval Office, President Joe Biden signed an executive order, Transforming Federal Customer Experience and Service Delivery to Rebuild Trust in Government, which promises to bring key government agencies into the digital era and decrease the red tape for a broad array of services, including passport renewals.





Michael J. Fox Gets Serious


Michael J. Fox is always positive, always optimistic, always inspiring -- until he's not. In a profound, wide-ranging, often funny interview with AARP The Magazine, Fox discusses how he has emerged from a period of health and emotional challenges that included recovering from major surgery and a shattered left arm that required a steel plate and 19 screws to repair with even greater focus and a deeper understanding of his purpose and joys. As he approaches the 30-year anniversary of his Parkinson's Disease diagnosis, Fox still finds new ways to enjoy life and make a difference.


Fox spent several decades of his celebrated career telling stories on screens, but as he approached his 60th birthday this June, his increasingly unreliable speech forced him to retire from acting. Led by his growing sense of gratitude, the critically acclaimed actor has found his present purpose – pioneering research for his self-titled foundation which is dedicated to finding a cure and improved therapies for his disease.


The following are excerpts from ATM's December/January 2022 cover story featuring Michael J. Fox. The issue is available in homes starting in December and online now at www.aarp.org/magazine/.









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Good Day. It’s Tuesday, December 14, 2021


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DECEMBER 14, 2021



7 Must-Do’s if You’re Retired and Broke
By Jordan Bishop

Retirement is supposed to be the time to enjoy your golden years. It may seem like the perfect time in life, but it doesn’t always work out that way. For some, retirement can be a difficult and confusing time, especially if they’re struggling financially.



While some people were fortunate enough to have planned ahead and saved up a lot of money before retiring, others either didn’t save enough or were struck with unexpected expenses that decimated their savings.

If you currently find yourself in this situation, retired and not able to make ends meet, you might be wondering how it happened, and it can be tempting to feel sorry for yourself, but instead, take this opportunity to think about how you’ll get back on your feet.




Viagra may be useful against Alzheimer's dementia


The impotence pill Viagra may be a useful treatment against Alzheimer's disease, say US researchers who have been studying its effects in the brain.


Tests in cells suggest the drug targets some of the proteins that accumulate in this type of dementia.

The Cleveland team also analyzed a database of 7m patients and found men who were on the drug had a lower risk of Alzheimer's.

More studies on it are worthwhile, they say in the journal Nature Aging.




This 68-year-old retiree lives on
$620 per month in Mexico

By Glen Rogers


In 1999, I took a weeklong vacation with a friend to Mazatlán, Mexico — and it was love at first sight. I was so smitten with the beach city that I went to a realtor the next day and bought a small house for $28,000.



My plan was to make it a second home for when I wanted to get away from California. But in 2002, at 49 years old, I decided to follow my favorite mantra — “Leap, and the net will appear” — and left the U.S. to live in Mexico full-time.


After a few years in Mazatlán, I was ready for a change. I considered several places, including Oaxaca and the Lake Chapala area, before turning my sights to San Miguel de Allende, a colonial-era city in Mexico’s central highlands, known for its baroque architecture.




Skin Care and Aging

Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, loses fat, and no longer looks as plump and smooth as it once did. Your veins and bones can be seen more easily. Scratches, cuts, or bumps can take longer to heal. Years of sun tanning or being out in the sunlight for a long time may lead to wrinkles, dryness, age spots, and even cancer. But, there are things you can do to protect your skin and to make it feel and look better.Older woman with healthy aging skin

Dry Skin and Itching


Many older people suffer from dry spots on their skin, often on their lower legs, elbows, and lower arms. Dry skin patches feel rough and scaly. There are many possible reasons for dry skin, such as:







5 Reasons Older Adults Aren't Getting Hired

If you're over 40, hunting for a job and not getting hired, you're far from alone. Adults in their 40s, 50s and 60s now make up half of the long-term unemployed (those out of work for more than six months) in the United States.


An older adult waiting for the bus next to a now hiring sign. Next Avenue, older workers not getting hired
Credit: Photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters via PBS NewsHour

Roughly 1.2 million older adults fall into this category. Given that there are more than 10.4 million open jobs, you'd think it would be easier for them to find work, especially with years of experience. It is anything but, and much more complicated than you might think.





TUESDAY ↓ SPECIAL



Post-exercise blood could help fight dementia


Scientists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology are tapping into the idea that the chemicals released into the bloodstream after exercise have rejuvenating properties that can help protect the brain.


It comes in the wake of research that has shown regular exercise is a lifestyle choice that effectively reduces the chances of developing dementia. Researchers believe some benefits could be transferred via a blood transfusion and are undertaking a year-long trial of the technique.

Some 60 participants who are in the early stages of Alzheimer’s are being given monthly blood transfusions from runners so that scientists can analyze the effects. The blood is being collected from 30 volunteers between the ages of 18 and 40 who run on a treadmill until they become exhausted.












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Good Day. It’s Monday, December 13, 2021


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It’s officially holiday season here at the Asylum, You can tell. The halls are decked out with all the trappings of Christmas. There are the usual wreathes, synthetic bows of holly, plastic Santa’s, and an equally plastic Rudolf flashing his battery operated nose.
 
There is a tree, of course. In fact, there is more than one. A decorated Christmas tree adorns each of our 3 floors, including one more in the dining room. And just to make sure we don’t forget there is supposed to be some connection between Christmas and Christ, a small nativity scene sits alone on a table in the lobby.Yes, there’s everything here to make the place feel like home. Except for the one thing the folks here really need. The love of family and friends.


To be fair, the reason many of our residents do not get visits from their loved ones is because there just are not too many friends and relatives left. Friends of old people are usually other old people who can’t get around like they used to. Still others, like myself, have people scattered around the country and visiting me would be a major undertaking. And then there are the others. Those residents whose families (and almost everybody else) have given up on them. These are the saddest cases of all. Not only have they been abandoned by their families, but they have abandoned themselves as well.

You can see it in their faces and in the way they carry themselves.
 
Their eyes have a look of wonderment. Not the amazed or curious look of a child, but a look of questioning. The look that says, “What the f**k happened to me?” I’ve seen this look before. Mostly in the nursing homes I had the misfortune of inhabiting a few years ago. If you ever want to get depressed in a hurry, visit a nursing home. You will run out and hug your wife or husband and kids and thank g-d you don’t have to stay in one. And while assisted living facilities are not as foreboding as nursing homes, the mood is often not much better. And all this comes together in one big inhospitable lump during the holidays.
 
Many of our residents have not only lost those who are dear to them, but their homes, too . And with that, their surroundings and lifestyles and neighborhoods they grew up in. Suddenly, they are thrust into an environment that is more interested in having them conform to a standard that is regimented and inflexible. That, to an independent person, can bring on a host of serious emotional problems. Problems, which often go untreated. The question is, should long-term care facilities be responsible for the emotional health of their residents? The answer has to be yes.


Along with the decorations and “pretend” holiday cheer, assisted living facilities need to identify and treat those residents whose lives have dramatically changed from what it was only a few months before. The shock of the transition to these new surroundings goes mostly unrecognized by the staff, who are neither trained to detect those with adjustment problems nor have the means to treat them. If a resident were found bleeding from a wound, or unable to function because of a worsening physical disability, they would be treated (or sent for treatment) immediately followed by a colorful array of tablets, pills and capsules. But with the mind or the soul, we stand by and allow the “bleeding” to continue.

“Tis the season folks. “Tis the season………………………………..

 





DECEMBER 13, 2021



Manchin Seniors takes teeth
from the plan for dental care

By Phil Galwitz

Sharon Marchio is unable to have teeth for eating, talking and laughing.

For the past few years, she has used dentures after removing the last part of her teeth. “My dentist calls them my floating teeth because no matter how sticky you are, if you eat anything hot or warm, they will loosen and be painful,” said Marcio, 73. Clarksburg, West Virginia.


Marchio believes that losing his teeth is just part of aging. In it is ubiquitous West Virginia, Where a A quarter of people aged 65 and over According to federal data, no state in the country has natural teeth.

Like half of those who enroll Medicare nationally, Marchio has no dental insurance. Concerns about costs led her to skip routine hygiene and examinations, key measures to prevent infections and tooth loss.




How to Deal With Ageism From Doctors and Nurses

The doctor is talking to the daughter who has accompanied you to a medical appointment, not you. A nurse speaks slowly in an unnaturally high-pitched voice, as if you were a child needing instruction.



What can you do about manifestations of ageism like these – the devaluing, diminishment or dismissal of older adults based on prejudice against old age?


"I don't confront these people; there's no use doing that. I just dump them and find someone else."




Improving mobility and quality of life for older adults


As we get older, transportation provides a vital link between home and community. Without reliable and easy ways to get around, many older adults (especially those who live alone) have limited access to essentials like groceries and medicine, let alone social interaction. A new report from the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), Developing Strategies To Enhance Mobility And Accessibility For Community-Dwelling Older Adults, looked at the mobility challenges, barriers, and gaps that older adults experience, with an eye toward developing forms of assistance or educational strategies to fill those gaps.



Funded by the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) with additional support from The Senior Source, the interdisciplinary research team from the University of Texas at Arlington included Kate Hyun, Caroline Krejci and Kathy Lee, along with Nilufer Oran Gibson and Troyee Saha. Hyun, a transportation engineer; Krejci, an industrial engineer; and Lee, a social worker, combined their unique perspectives and approaches. They will present their findings in a webinar on January 26.




Getting Enough Fluids

It’s important for your body to have plenty of fluids each day. Water helps you digest your food, absorb nutrients from food, and then get rid of the unused waste. Water is found in foods—both solids and liquids, as well as in its natural state.


Remember, water is a good way to add fluids to your daily routine without adding calories.

Try these tips for getting enough fluids:

  •     Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink water or other fluids.
  •     Take sips of water, milk, or juice between bites during meals.
  •     Add liquids throughout the day.
  •     Have a cup of low-fat soup as an afternoon snack.
  •     Drink a full glass of water when you take a pill.
  •     Have a glass of water before you exercise.
  •     Drink fat-free or low-fat milk, or other drinks without added sugars.
  •     If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so sensibly and in moderation. That means up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks for men.
  •     Don’t stop drinking liquids if you have a urinary control problem. Talk with your doctor about treatment.




1 in 5 Americans are saving less
for retirement due to Covid

By Jessica Dickler

The pandemic has taken a hefty toll on retirement security for many in the U.S.


About 17% of Americans said they’re saving less for retirement due to Covid’s impact on their finances, according to a recent survey by The Penny Hoarder.

And yet, nearly as many — roughly 16% — said they are saving more money thanks to the forced decrease in spending. The survey polled more than 1,000 adults in October.







Money Advice For Retirees On Fixed Incomes
When Inflation Is Soaring

By Kerry Hannon


Inflation rocketed by 6.2% in the 12 months through October 2021, the fastest pace since 1990, and retirees on fixed incomes are feeling the painful pinch. They're seeing prices soaring for everything from rent to gasoline to Medicare prescription drug premiums, and low rates on bank savings accounts aren't helping.


The nonpartisan Senior Citizens League received more than 200 emails recently "with many retired and disabled senders describing the dire situations they face as rapidly rising inflation makes it impossible to pay the bills," the group said in a statement.


"This is a tough time to be on a fixed income," said Lisa A.K. Kirchenbauer, a Certified Financial Planner and founder of Omega Wealth Management in Arlington, Va.












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Good Day. It’s Sunday, December 12, 2021



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With A Smart Phone For Free,
You Get What You Pay For.



Don’t call me. And I’m sorry if you have been waiting for me to return your call, but I have no way of knowing that you called, texted or left a message. Why?. Because I don’t have a phone. At least not one that’s working, that is. My so called “Smart Phone” just went deaf, dumb and blind on me. Well, not completely blind. Right now, as I look at it sitting next to me, its start screen with the words “ULTIMATE MOBILE PHONE XPERIANCE” is blinking off and on, refusing to boot up. Hopefully, the battery will wear down soon and put it out of its misery, and mine.


Being a frugal person, when the chance for me to get one of those new smart phones for free (air-time included), I could not resist. After all, everybody had one. Why not me.

 
The offer came from the company that was already supplying my free cell phone
and service, Assurance Wireless. I had been using that phone for over three years with little difficulty. It was reliable and, best of all, free.[1] I thought, “how nice of them to want to bring me up to date with a smart phone.” So I gave up my reliable old cell and went high-tech. Big mistake. What used to be a simple-to-use piece of equipment had turned into a nightmare of passwords, downloads and finger scrolling. I had to go through three steps just to make a call and at least as many just to answer one. And, because of that impossibly small pop-up virtual “keyboard”, typing anything took forever. But I put up with all its little foibles because it was, as I had been told, the wave of the future. Wave? Tsunami is more like it. The phone has been nothing but trouble.


Spotty service, slow downloads, impossible to read prompts and error messages. Who needs this?


Fortunately, I don’t rely on my phone as my primary means of communication. That’s what I have a laptop for. I prefer email to any actual conversation and the three email services I use fill the bill nicely. I figure anything you have to say can be said in a few sentences or in an attached photo. No need for greetings and salutations or small talk which, for some reason, we feel the necessity for when we talk on the phone. But that does not negate the need for a phone. Sometimes a text or email won’t do. Like when I’m at the doctor’s and I need transportation to get home. Or when I need to talk to human being about my Social Security. And, more recently, those tele-medicine visits we’ve become familiar with.


I tried to get some satisfaction from Assurance wireless, but all they were interested in was whether I installed a new SIM card they sent me. No, I didn’t. Why don’t you send me a new phone with a new SIM card in it? I asked. We can’t do that. They said. End of conversation. Apparently, their customer service is as trusty as their phones.


I haven’t given up on smart phones completely. Just the free ones. I found a phone made just for crabby old people like me that comes with a reasonable monthly plan ($15). The phone is inexpensive as well. I’ll let you know how that works out when I get it. Until then, if you want me, you know where you can find me. Online……………………..

[1] For those not wondering about how I get free phone service it’s available to anyone on Medicaid or other financial assistance programs.







DECEMBER 12, 2021


National Poll Shows Voters Want Biden Administration,
Congress to Deliver COVID-19 Relief to Assisted Living


American voters of all political stripes agree that President Biden should prioritize assisted living communities for COVID-19 relief and workforce solutions as caregivers for the nation’s seniors face daunting pandemic-related financial losses and staffing shortages.


The findings of a new national survey released by Argentum and conducted by ReconMR (Reconnaissance Market Research) show 86% of those asked said the Biden Administration should target COVID-19 relief funding for senior living communities, and four out of five (77%) believe the remaining $20 billion in the Provider Relief Fund for pandemic support should go to assisted living caregivers.

These numbers show an increase from an Argentum-commissioned poll from summer 2020, when 80% of voters agreed with a similar question about federal COVID-19 relief for assisted living communities.




Blood pressure climbed during coronavirus pandemic,
especially among women, study suggests

By Jacqueline Howard

US adults -- especially women -- have seen a rise in blood pressure during the coronavirus pandemic, a new study suggests.


The study, published Monday in the journal Circulation, included data on 464,585 employees and their spouses or partners from several different companies who participated in employer-sponsored wellness programs by Quest Diagnostics each year.


As part of the programs, workers and their partners from all 50 states and the District of Columbia had their blood pressure measured for three years in 2018, 2019 and 2020. Dr. Luke Laffin, co-director of the Center for Blood Pressure Disorders at Cleveland Clinic, and his colleagues at Cleveland Clinic and Quest Diagnostics examined those blood pressure readings.




Clinical study shows therapeutic sleep training
for older adults can prevent depression



A new clinical study revealed that therapeutic sleep training can ease symptoms of depression in older adults.


The form of cognitive behavioral sleep training, tabbed CBT-I, helps teach adults how to break bad habits to prep their mind and body for a good night's sleep.


The peer-reviewed study, published last week in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, showed that adults who have insomnia can are less likely to develop depression. The study's findings are among the first to show evidence of treating insomnia through a behavior strategy and not medication.



Millions of workers retired during the pandemic.
The economy needs them to "unretire," experts say.

By Sarah Sarah

An economist will tell you it's a hot labor market: A record number of people quit their jobs in September, and the U.S. is seeing record job openings as the economy chugs back to life from the coronavirus pandemic. The pandemic drove millions of workers into early retirement — and experts say they could be key to reviving the economy.



The number of people who retired rose much faster than the typical pace during the pandemic. More than 3 million additional people retired compared with normal, a Federal Reserve Bank of Saint Louis analysis found. Meanwhile, the economy is still down nearly 4 million jobs from before COVID-19.


"40% of the older workers that were pushed out of the labor market because they were unemployed, they were laid off, they were fired during the pandemic, 40% of them were permanent job losers and most of them said OK, I'm not just a discouraged worker, I'm not a long-term unemployed, I'm going to tell the [Labor Department] survey I'm retired,'" said Teresa Ghilarducci, labor economist and professor at The New School.






How to Unlock Your Mobile Phone With All Major Carriers​
By Marc Saltzman


After talking with family and friends, you may realize you’re paying way too much for your mobile phone service and decide to give your carrier a call.



They assure you that the price for the plan you’re on is the best they can offer. So you decide to take your business elsewhere since you’ve done your homework and found that other carriers cost less, including a crop of new mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) undercutting many of the big guys — with comparable call quality, coverage and data speeds.

But is your phone unlocked so you have the freedom to go to another company? Or will you have to shell out big bucks for a new device?






This year’s flu strain particularly dangerous for older adults
Read more  >>  https://wtop.com/health-fitness/2021/11/this-years-flu-strain-is-particularly-dangerous-for-older-adults/
===============================================================
What's the Best Bedtime For Better Heart Health?
By Peter Urban
Read more  >>  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2021/bedtime-heart-health.html?cmp=EMC-DSO-NLC-HLTH---NMCTRL-120121-HT1-5972588&ET_CID=5972588&ET_RID=32630120&encparam=k6W7ADklZKWYtRaLiI1cWhih7022%2fdz%2f5aj29yt%2fWGQ%3d
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Could the Pandemic Transform Nursing Homes?
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/pandemic-transform-nursing-homes/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=cf29a22e52-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_16_21___COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-cf29a22e52-165407981&mc_cid=cf29a22e52&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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People with dementia may not benefit from a clutter-free environment
Reviewed by Emily Henderson
Read more  >>  https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211126/People-with-dementia-may-not-benefit-from-a-clutter-free-environment.aspx
===============================================================
Sanders Calls on Biden to Slash
'Outrageous' Medicare Premium Hike

Read more  >>  https://www.commondreams.org/news/2021/12/03/sanders-calls-biden-slash-outrageous-medicare-premium-hike
===============================================================
What childless people need to know
about planning for old age

By Sara Zeff Geber
Read more  >>  https://www.marketwatch.com/story/dont-have-kids-7-ways-to-prepare-for-old-age-2018-08-16
===============================================================
More Americans living alone
as milestones slip later in life

By Reid Wilson
Read more  >>  https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/583723-more-americans-living-alone-as-milestones-slip-later-in-life
===============================================================
For Older Adults, Smelling the Roses May Be More Difficult
By Judith Graham
Read more  >>  https://khn.org/news/article/navigating-aging-smell-loss-older-adults/
===============================================================
Senior living’s grand illusion needs a reality check
Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/editors-columns/senior-livings-grand-illusion-needs-a-reality-check/
===============================================================
Why healthy, older adults shouldn't take aspirin daily
By Brea Love
Read more  >>  https://www.abc10.com/article/news/health/adults-shouldnt-take-aspirin-daily/103-cc51cc41-e402-4dd6-86a1-d9128d7f258c
===============================================================
Charting The New Map of Life
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/charting-the-new-map-of-life/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=12f83a87b0-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_11_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-12f83a87b0-165407981&mc_cid=12f83a87b0&mc_eid=94767a79b9
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Is memory loss due to aging or dementia?
This important test could help

Read more  >>  https://nypost.com/2021/12/05/this-test-can-tell-whether-youre-aging-or-have-dementia/
===============================================================
Adults hope to receive long-term care at home,
but many anticipate moving to assisted living

Read more  >>  https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/news/adults-hope-to-receive-long-term-care-at-home-but-many-anticipate-moving-to-assisted-living-survey/
===============================================================
Here's what could happen to Social Security,
Medicare and other payments
if Congress doesn’t fix the debt ceiling

Read more  >>  Read more  >> https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/06/going-past-debt-ceiling-could-delay-social-security-government-checks.html
===============================================================
The ABCs of THC: Marijuana Use for Older Adults
Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/marijuana-use-for-older-adults/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ff66d56e40-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_23_21_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-ff66d56e40-165407981&mc_cid=ff66d56e40&mc_eid=94767a79b9
===============================================================
This Blood Type Is 82% More Likely to Develop Dementia
By Kimberly Zapata
Read more  >>  https://parade.com/1289395/kimberlyzapata/research-says-this-blood-type-is-82-more-likely-to-develop-dementia-heres-how-to-use-that-information/
===============================================================
Money Advice for Retirees on Fixed Incomes
When Inflation Is Soaring

Read more  >>  https://www.nextavenue.org/retirees-on-fixed-income-inflation-soaring/?utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ff66d56e40-Tuesday_Newsletter_11_23_21_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_056a405b5a-ff66d56e40-165407981&mc_cid=ff66d56e40&mc_eid=94767a79b9







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     As we grow older we are less likely to welcome new tastes. Nutritionists say this phenomenon is due to programming - when we get used to eating certain types of foods when we're young and our brain are programmed to accept these flavors. Sadly, with age, the brain's ability to be trained is less efficient.

     As we continue to age, our desire to eat is reduced. There are several reasons for this, including the shrinkage of the stomach. The brain simply tells older people that they're full faster. There's even a change in a mechanism in the btrain telling us when we need to eat or drink.

     Combine this with reduced saliva flow, dentures and a weaker sense of taste and it's easy to see why eating takes a back seat in old age.

source Google. Food preferences for seniors



Food. More Than Just Nourishment

If you think of food as only a way to re-fuel the body or a way to avoid starving , this may not be the blog post for you. While it’s true, we need food to live, eating is, for most people, a way of adding some pleasure to your life. Or, at least, it should be. And, for many seniors, mealtimes become a way of socializing, gossip and learning as much as a time to do your body some good. And just because we are a little advanced in years should not mean we can no longer appreciate good food. And conversely, know when food is crap too.
 
In my 7 plus years as a resident here at the A.L.F. I have been subjected to some terrible food, some mediocre food and, on rare occasions, some decent food. Unfortunately, not all the meals served here are made with our health in mind. Carbs overshadow proteins and little effort is made to make the food look, or taste, appetizing. At best, it’s subsistent level food made to satisfy a budget as much as the nutritional needs of seniors.
 
Therefore, while this post is not meant for those of us who must take our meals in an institutional setting, there is much information for the rest of you who are fortunate enough to buy, prepare and choose your own meals.
 
As a matter of complete disclosure, I must tell you I have not tested or tasted much of what you will read here. But the articles are written by experts and the information should be viewed with that in mind. Bon appétit……..
 
 

SOME TYPICAL INSTITUTIONAL MEALS FOR SENIORS




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The 7 Most Addictive Foods
And How To Stop Eating Them
By Alexandra Cerone, Samantha Curra

I’m a salad-loving vegetarian, but I have a dirty little secret: I’m also a devoted junk food junkie. As healthy as I try to keep my diet, I still fall prey to bad eating habits. For instance, when I’m binge-watching my favorite shows, you’ll probably find me binge-eating my favorite unhealthy snacks: Ruffles Sour Cream & Onion Potato Chips or chocolate Häagen-Dazs ice cream. No matter how sweet and colorful the assortment of fruit on my counter, it doesn’t stand a chance against chips and ice cream.


If you’re a devoted junk food eater like me, of if you’re … I don’t know… HUMAN, you know how hard it is to fight the urge to overindulge. Have you ever wondered why that is? According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, some ultra-processed foods can be just as addictive as alcohol and cigarettes. The worst offenders are pizza, chocolate, potato chips, cookies, ice cream, french fries, and cheeseburgers.


It’s no accident that these foods taste so good: They’ve been engineered with “industrial formulations” that combine large amounts of sugar, salt, oils, fats, and other additives—ingredients that offer such a rush of pleasure from the very first bite that your body screams for more.


***

5 Foods to Say No to After 50
By Alison Gwinn


We're not going to lie. Eating healthily after 50 means effort on two fronts: boosting your intake of good-for-you foods such as berries, leafy greens, whole grains and lean proteins while cutting out the foods that clog your arteries and oh-so-easily expand your waistline.



When it comes to the latter, focus less on making certain foods verboten (who doesn't suddenly want chocolate when told never to eat it?) and more on how your health is more important than the sugar spike or instant satiety they offer. When possible, just say no — or at least “Whoa!” — to the following.
Skip it: Fried foods that triple the calories


If it helps, pause to imagine the vat of oil that basket of fries or onion rings has been submerged in, and consider how its saturated fat “may have a negative impact on blood cholesterol,” says Amy Gorin, a registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats in Stamford, Connecticut. Not sure how to cut back? Here are three expert tips:


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Just 200 Fewer Calories Per Day Brings
 Big Health Rewards for Obese Seniors

By Cara Murez


New research shows that cutting just 200 calories a day and exercising moderately could lead to not only weight loss but improved vascular health in older obese adults.

These lifestyle changes may help offset age-related increases in aortic stiffness, which is a measure of vascular health and impacts heart disease.


"This is the first study to assess the effects of aerobic exercise training with and without reducing calories on aortic stiffness, which was measured via cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging [CMR] to obtain detailed images of the aorta," said study author Tina Brinkley, an associate professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at the Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Prevention at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.





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Your Metabolism Changes As You Age,
 Just Not When You Think

By Dennis Thompson

Everyone knows that your metabolism peaks in your teenage years, when you're fit and active and feeling your oats.


And everyone knows that a person's metabolism slows down in middle age, as bodies start to expand and sag, and become less energetic.


But that's all wrong, it now appears — fake news about how humans age that's gained the currency of truth over the year






***

Healthy dietary intake associated with lower brain iron,
better cognition in older adults



Healthy dietary intake associated with lower brain iron, better cognition in older adults
UK researchers conduct an MRI scan as part of the study, which suggests that a healthy diet is linked to lower brain iron and better cognition in older adults. Credit: University of Kentucky



Research conducted at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine suggests that higher intake of specific nutrients is associated with lower brain iron concentration and better cognitive performance in older adults.


The study was recently published in the Neurobiology of Aging and highlights the important balance of non-heme iron for optimal neuronal function. Excess non-heme brain iron has been associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. High levels of brain iron can also be seen in normal aging, where they have been correlated with poor cognitive performance.



***

5 Superfoods That Reduce
Inflammation from Arthritis
By Barbara Brody


If your hips, knees or hands have gotten stiffer and more painful in recent years, you might be among the more than 32 million Americans who suffer from osteoarthritis (OA). This degenerative joint condition, often described as the “wear and tear” form of arthritis, causes the cartilage that normally cushions joints to break down, allowing bone to rub against bone. The result: pain, redness, stiffness and inflammation.


This kind of arthritis is mainly treated by pain-relieving medications, but lifestyle changes can also help a lot. Exercise and weight loss tend to be top of the list. Regularly moving the impacted joint helps stretch and strengthen the muscles surrounding it, which can ease stiffness and promote mobility. If you're overweight, shedding a few pounds will help take some strain off a weight-bearing joint (like your knee or hip), as well as reduce the amount of inflammatory proteins that are naturally produced by fat cells.


Dietary changes are, of course, the key to losing weight, but tweaking your eating habits can also help control arthritis symptoms. That's because while osteoarthritis is primarily caused by overstressing one or more joints, “there's also a component that has to do with the body's response to injury, which is inflammation,” says Melissa Ann Prest, a registered dietician and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She points to the Mediterranean and DASH diets, which limit added sugar, refined carbohydrates and saturated fat, as anti-inflammatory standouts.


***

Five Surprising Ways Coffee Can Boost Your Health
By Kimberly Goad


Caffeine lovers looking for a healthy way to get their daily fix have long been led to believe that tea offers greater health and wellness benefits. Not anymore. Nutrition experts and medical researchers are finding all kinds of reasons to recommend indulging in that cup of joe, most of them rooted in the fact that coffee is the single greatest contributor to total antioxidant intake.



“Coffee is abundant in bioactive compounds that promote health,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. As she explains, research published in The New England Journal of Medicine shows that these compounds may improve the gut microbiome (made up of healthy bacteria that aid in digestion and boost immunity) and reduce what's called oxidative stress, which occurs when free radicals outnumber antioxidants in a way that leads to disease-causing cellular damage in the body. “The beans also have a deep rich hue, and we know that the deeper the color of a plant, the more benefits we can expect for health.” Those benefits, research shows, translate into everything from lowering your risk of diabetes to potentially boosting your brain health.


Moderation, of course, is key. According to current dietary guidelines, three to five 8-ounce cups of coffee — or up to 400 mg of caffeine — per day can be part of a healthy diet. But that’s true only for plain black coffee, not cappuccinos, lattes and macchiatos, which are typically high in calories, sugar and fat. And keep in mind that “some medications or health conditions may limit your tolerance to caffeine or its safety profile, so discuss this with your health care provider,” says Jill Weisenberger, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition.


***

Is Fruit Bad for You? What the Science Says
By Thomas Wrona

Most people enjoy eating fruit,  it’s a near-universal health recommendation, and even some centenarians attribute their longevity to it–but can fruit be bad for you?

The short answer is, it depends…


Fruit, unlike vegetables, is the only part of the plant that is meant to be eaten by humans and other animals. That’s why it’s sweet, hanging there for us to pick, and a natural laxative. Since plants don’t have feet or wings, they count on creatures like us to eat their fruit, carry the seeds away, and spread them far and wide.


For most people not on a keto diet, moderate consumption of low sugar fruits is probably fine. But not all fruits are equal, and for groups of people with insulin resistance and carbohydrate sensitivity, fruit does have its downsides.


***


Why do elderly people suffer
from loss of appetite?
By Dr B Padmakumar


Lack of appetite is a major problem faced by elderly people and the condition is more prevalent among men than women.

Fewer calories needed


The elderly suffer from appetite loss owing to several reasons. One among them is the change that the body undergoes as one ages. Elderly people may not require as many calories as youngsters as they rarely engage in tasks that need physical exertion like the latter. As a result, the metabolic mechanism of senior citizens gradually slows down.

Taste buds

Another cause for appetite loss is a fall in the number of taste buds on the tongue as a person advances in age. When there are fewer taste buds, the ability to enjoy good taste comes down and could lead to a lack of appetite.


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7 Superfoods That Help You Get a Better Night's Sleep
By Nicole Pajer


You avoid blue light before bed, have a comfortable mattress and shades to keep your room dark. But did you know that what you eat ­— and when you eat it ­­— can also play a role in how well you sleep?


That’s because while your sleep-wake cycle is controlled by your body’s master clock, located in the hypothalamus of the brain, you also have peripheral clocks in organs like the liver and pancreas. These control physiological processes like managing your blood sugar, cholesterol, hormone secretion and digestion. “If you eat at a time that's contradictory to your circadian system, it throws off the peripheral clocks,” explains Josna Adusumilli, M.D., a neurologist and sleep medicine physician at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. Such misalignment of metabolic processes can impact your would-be slumber.


Ideally, experts say, you should eat a balanced dinner (one that includes protein, carbs and fiber), finishing at least two hours before bedtime, as eating cues your body that it’s time to be awake. “The human body was not meant to digest food lying down,” says Michael Breus, a clinical psychologist and fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.


***

Don’t Qualify for SNAP?
The Commodity Supplemental Food Program
Could Help Seniors

By Georgina Tzanetos


The American Rescue Plan provided an additional $37 million to boost a program for elderly citizens who might need extra help with groceries and food each month.



The Commodity Supplemental Food Program provides low-income elderly individuals with supplemental nutritious food from the U.S. Department of Agriculture each month. The monthly packages of food do not include whole meals and meal packages but rather supply supplemental food products that are “good sources of the nutrients typically lacking in the diets of the beneficiary population.”


The CSFP program supplies a variety of food, like grains, oatmeal, corn grits, beans, peanut butter, canned chicken, beef and tuna and canned low-sodium vegetables like corn and peas.


***

Extra dairy intake lowers risk of falls and
 fractures among older adults in residential care

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

Increasing intake of foods rich in calcium and protein such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, reduces falls and fractures in older adults living in residential care, finds a randomized controlled trial published by The BMJ today.


This is one of only a few studies to examine whether getting these nutrients from foods (as opposed to supplements) are effective and safe, and the researchers say this approach has "widespread implications as a public health measure for fracture prevention."


Older adults living in residential care often have low calcium and protein intakes, which can lead to weak bones and an increase in the risk of falls and fractures. It is estimated that older adults in aged care are the source of about 30% of all hip fractures.



***

Polyphenol-rich diet improves the
 intestinal permeability in older adults

Reviewed by Emily Henderson

The increase of intestinal permeability is associated with factors such as aging, food allergies and intolerances and unhealthy diets. This alteration causes a reduction of the gut integrity barrier that triggers the transit of potentially-toxic substances for the blood, and is related to the development of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and even Alzheimer's.



A polyphenol-rich diet improves the intestinal permeability in old people, according to an article published in the journal Clinical Nutrition. The study is led by Cristina Andrés-Lacueva, professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and head of the Research Group of Biomarkers and Nutritional Metabolomics of Food of the University of Barcelona and the Biomedical Research Center of Fragility and Healthy Ageing (CIBERFES), also part of the Catalan Food Innovation Network (XIA).


This European study, conducted within the framework of the Joint Programming Initiative - A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (JPI HDHL), was carried out in people aged over sixty who underwent a polyphenol-rich diet for eight weeks. The results show that including up to three daily portions of apple, cocoa, dark chocolate, green tea, cranberries, oranges or pomegranate juice, improves intestinal permeability when making specific changes in the intestinal microbiota.


***

Are Salt Substitutes Really Good for Your Health?

The human body needs a certain amount of salt — or rather, the sodium in salt — to maintain bodily functions such as adequate fluid levels, muscle function and proper pH in our blood. Yet for some, consuming salt can cause high blood pressure, especially as we age, putting us at risk for hypertension and heart disease.



We know that reducing sodium intake is good for overall health and now a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine proves that.



The study found that by reducing salt (sodium) in the diet and replacing it with salt substitutes containing reduced sodium and increased potassium can lower blood pressure. The rates of stroke and major cardiovascular events in participants were also lower with the salt substitute than with regular salt. The study took place over a five-year period in China — a place known for high salt use —  and focused on people 60 and older with high blood pressure.




Americans Love Sodium

"High blood pressure is a well-known cause of developing heart disease and strokes, says Dr. Nachiket Patel, clinical professor of medicine at University of Arizona Medical School in Phoenix and an interventional cardiologist. "Consuming a lot of salt causes water retention and that causes high blood pressure and it can also decrease the beneficial effects of drugs that lower blood pressure."


***

Older Adults Who Are Vegan
 Need 58 Percent Less Medication

By Nicole Axworthy

A vegan diet is linked to a fewer number of medications prescribed to older adults, according to a new study published in the medical journal American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. The study’s researchers investigated the link between diet and polypharmacy, where a person takes five or more prescribed medications.



Polypharmacy comes with a prevalent health issue among seniors: potential adverse side effects of interactions when taking numerous medications. The researchers point to data showing that individuals who take more than five medications a day carry an 88 percent higher risk of adverse drug events as well as higher mortality rates. They hypothesized that a plant-based diet and healthy lifestyle choices decrease the number of medications needed and therefore reduce the risk of prescription side effects.VegNews.HealthMedication


For the study, data from 328 participants who were 60 years or older was collected through questionnaires and measurements at Loma Linda University Drayson Center in Loma Linda, CA, between 2015 and 2016. Results suggest that a plant-based diet reduces the number of medications seniors were taking by 58 percent compared to meat eaters, even after adjusting for covariates. Vegetarian participants also consumed fewer medications than meat eaters. The study found that an increase in age, body mass index, and presence of disease suggest an increased number of medications taken; however, a plant-based diet showed the lowest amount of medications throughout the sample. Body mass index also had a significant positive association with the number of medications.



FDA recommends restaurants,
 food manufacturers cut back on use of salt
By Kelly McCarthy, Sasha Pezenik


The new guidance hopes to reduce overall sodium intake by 12%.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released sweeping new guidance for the food industry to voluntarily reduce sodium in processed, packaged and prepared foods in an attempt to reduce Americans' consumption.



"The FDA is issuing a final guidance, 'Voluntary Sodium Reduction Goals: Target Mean and Upper Bound Concentrations for Sodium in Commercially Processed, Packaged, and Prepared Foods,' which provides voluntary short-term sodium reduction targets for food manufacturers, chain restaurants and foodservice operators for 163 categories of processed, packaged and prepared foods," the agency announced.


Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock lauded the new sodium reduction guidance in a press conference Wednesday morning. She said it is a "critical step" in improving Americans' nutrition, reducing the burden of diet-related chronic diseases and advancing health equity, predicting the effort would "become one of the most significant public health nutrition interventions in a generation."






RECIPES AND WEBSITES YOU MUST SEE….AND USE



Cook what's in your fridge. One of my favorite food apps. Empty refrigerator? No problem. Just check off what items you do have on hand and the apps will find a sway to make it into a meal.

 GOOD BREAKFAST MADE EASY
https://www.care.com/c/quick-easy-healthy-meals-for-seniors

This website has real breakfast, lunch and dinner suggestions plus tips on how to make cooking easier.

EASY TO FOLLOW RECIPES
https://seniorhomecarecalgary.com/21-quick-easy-meals-for-seniors-2/

From our friends in Canada this website features real food that you can make with easy-to-follow step by step instructions.

EGGS AND OTHER GREAT BREAKFASTS
https://www.australianeggs.org.au/nutrition/meal-plans/weight-gain-for-elderly-meal-plan

Weight Gain For The Elderly 7 Day Meal Plan. A week’s worth of meals for healthy, but underweight seniors. Lots of good egg dishes are featured.


LIKE MEAT?
https://www.hormel.com/Recipes.aspx?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lWNFEgl4zDQHrcmAWndSb1tQxl3OQ9V2Di-3K3NTSUd5v1zHnAyBWBoCBysQAvD_BwE

Life is not all veggies, bland meals and meals fit only for a rabbit. For seniors who like to eat meat the people at Hormel have designed this great site with hundreds of recipes (with pictures) for every meal or occasion.


SIMPLE AND INTERESTING
https://www.pinterest.com/homeinsteadinc/senior-friendly-recipes/

Are you all-thumbs in the kitchen? Do you barely know how to boil water? Pinterest has assembled some really simple non-boring things to make for even the most clueless senior.

-[]-

Seniors are like real people. We have other things to do besides playing Bingo and doctor’s visits.  Therefore, we can’t always be home for all three meals. If that’s you here are a few websites specifically centered on one meal a day.

WHAT'S FOR BREAKFAST?

HEALTHY BREAKFAST ALTERNATIVES

I won’t lie. This is not my kind of food. But it is for many people who want (or must) eat healthier breakfasts.


REAL FOOD WITH AN ENPHASIS ON PROTEIN
https://www.prevention.com/food-nutrition/healthy-eating/g23709836/high-protein-breakfasts/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=arb_ga_pre_d_bm_g23709836&gclid=Cj0KCQiA4b2MBhD2ARIsAIrcB-TCOk_kRQrH6-3m6LYrXodhZ3whsas3TP-1hEVLrxW6uozZWcDfLYwaAmj0EALw_wcB

More my style. Some REAL breakfasts with Real food. Fo those of us who have a craving for more protein, and still stay healthy.


WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?

QUICK LUNCH OPTIONS
https://companionsforseniors.com/2020/10/quick-healthy-lunch-ideas-for-seniors/

Breakfast and dinner may get all the glory, but lunch is an incredibly important meal in its own right. With that being said, it can also be difficult to squeeze in time to eat lunch, which makes it essential to have quick and nutritious options ready to go in your back pocket. Here are five filling and nutritious lunch ideas for the elderly that are also quick, easy, and affordable.


DAIRY FOR LUNCH?
https://www.usdairy.com/recipes/lunch-ideas?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lS17ZRb3NacZWIdk9xtPre54u-z6Iph-KXwByjSpWsSkgyUJrz1vmhoCyHEQAvD_BwE

Featuring some not-so-usual dairy lunches


MUFFINS AND BAGELS
https://thomasbreads.com/recipes/lunch?gclid=CjwKCAiAvriMBhAuEiwA8Cs5lTyTdiw1-cP0kN-9PETtm-q4NvZiDhuCJ71Qb_u41DedT1hpFMj7qBoC86MQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Do you love bagels or English muffins instead of boring old bread? The folks at Thomas’s designed some over-the-top bagel/muffin recipes for a super lunch.



WHAT'S FOR DINNER?

FOODS THAT HEAL
https://www.elderoptionsoftexas.com/nutritional-dinner-ideas-for-the-elderly.htm

This website has some easy and healthy dinner recipes for people over the age of 65 who have one or more degenerative disorders such as heart disease, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, macular degeneration, and osteoporosis. The recipes are slightly more "involved" and require more than just some simple ingredients.


QUICK DINNER IDEAS

Quick, easy dinner ideas


JUST SNACKING?

Seniors, after all, are just human. And like other humans we love our snacks. Unfortunately, our more sedentary lifestyles don’t allow us to burs up those calories like we did when we were 17. But take heart.There is still snacking in our lives.


HEALTHY? YES. BORING? NO
https://seniors.lovetoknow.com/Snacks_for_Elderly

More healthy, but not too boring snacks


SWEET TREATS
https://www.umh.org/assisted-independent-living-blog/sweet-and-healthy-snacks-for-seniors

Popsicles? Yes, and other sweet snacks for seniors




DON'T WANT TO COOK...

If you hate the idea of cooking, or going to the store or your just tired of planning a meal for yourself why not allow someone else do it for you.

MEAL DELIVERY

I can’t say I’ve used any of the sites listed but the idea intrigues me. I’ll let you be the judge. If you try one let me know.


SENIORS EAT OUT.…

Like food? Love to eat out? Me too. But not all restaurants are conducive for those of us who prefer a more relaxed (and quieter) atmosphere. Here are two websites that can help.


QUIET RESTAURANTS?
https://sixtyandme.com/how-to-find-a-quiet-senior-friendly-restaurant/

Not a restaurant guide but there are tips on how to find a restaurant that lets you hear the person seated next to you.


ON THE CHEAP!
https://livingonthecheap.com/restaurants-offering-senior-discounts/

An A to Z list of your favorite restaurants and the senior discounts they offer.



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